Laura Masterson and Patty at 47th Avenue FarmLet nature set your table with fresh and delicious produce, locally farmed in tune with the seasons. With our CSA – now in its 22nd season! – you pick up a bag or more of bounty every week for less than $3.50 a day for a half share, or $6.30 a day to feed a family of four.

Shares are limited and move as fast as pole beans, so reserve your space today. To learn more and sign up, start with our How the Farm Works page, or go straight to the info/order pages for our two pickup sites, SE Portland and Lake Oswego.

Look forward to seeing you on Facebook, on Instagram, and at pick-up!

An amazing winter and spring of delicious, responsibly farmed produce is happening soon – sign up today!

Sign up for occasional news from our farm, advance notices on shares and events, special offers, and more!

Getting Oriented

Winter Pick-Up Schedule

47th Ave Farm (SE)
Tuesdays 5-7pm on the following dates:

October 30
November 13
December 4 & 18
January 8 & 22
February 5 & 19
March 5 & 19
April 2 & 16

Luscher Farm
Thursdays 5-7pm on the following dates:

November 1 & 15
December 6 & 20
January 10 & 24
February 7 & 21
March 7 & 21
April 4 & 18


Southeast
Pick-Up Notes:

We live on a very narrow gravel road, which can easily become congested during pickup. Please take some alternative form of transportation if possible. If you drive, it’s also extremely helpful if you park at least a block away and walk in.

Please bring your own plastic, paper or earth-friendly bags. We can re-use clean cardboard egg cartons.

Ask us about our bucket exchange program if you’d like to bring your compost to the farm.


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FARM NEWS, NOTES AND (AGRI)CULTURE

In Your Share, Week of Nov 12th, 2018

Posted by Laura

Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays… I love all my family traditions – old and new – and all the great food! Our traditions have evolved over the years… I grew up loving sweet potatoes with marshmallow and now usually make Delicata Squash Rings. I don’t remember ever eating kale, collards or chicory, but now those are ubiquitious – in week day meals and on holidays. And since we don’t grow giant russest potatoes, I’ve switched from mashed to roasted potatoes. I also grew up with canned pumpkin and when I first started farming my family was perplexed by the sugar pie pumpkin I brought home for the holidays. We had to dig deep through my grandmothers old cookbooks to find a recipe, but we did find one and I still use it every Thanksgiving. Hardly need turkey with all these tasty treats. Hope you and your family have a happy & delicious holiday!

Lots more great winter veggies to come this season so let your friends know that they can still sign up for a prorated Winter/Spring CSA Share.

Amazing recipes for everything in your share are available to members at our website and at  Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Brussel Sprouts: Tall stalks of sprouts! These are one of the most difficult veggies to grow. This year, the plants were big and beautiful, but the sprouts definitely sustained some damage. Luckily, looks aren’t everything! Pop the sprouts off the stalk and peel a few layers off and they’ll be good to go. Sprouts are great roasted or shaved thin into salad. And I always have to include this super simple recipe for them with Gnocchi & Pesto.
  • Carrots: So sweet that most of them get eaten raw! If you have some left, try roasted turnip & carrot – I like a super simple prep with just olive oil, salt and pepper.
  • Cooking Celery: Perfect for stuffing! It doesn’t have to be cooked, but this celery has a slightly stronger flavor than the store bought stuff so try it before you dip it in the peanut butter. May be better suited to a Chopped Salad or soup.
  • Collard Greens: Love those dark winter greens! I usually just chop and sauté, but this Salad with Pickled Apple is amazing.
  • Sugarloaf Chicory: I love these complex chicory flavor in salads with strong dressings – think blue cheese crumbles, anchovies or bright lemon vinaigrette with garlic. If you sauté the greens the flavor is much more mellow which can also be nice.
  • Yellow Onions: A staple.
  • Garlic: More often than not, dinner at our house starts with some onions & garlic sautéd in olive oil and then we decide what direction to go from there… maybe roast some some peppers and put that over pasta, or cook up a big bunch of greens and put poached eggs on top. So many delicious options!
  • Hot Peppers: A mix of Jalapeño and Czech Black.
  • Potatoes: We’ve been growing this variety of ‘Nicola’ potatoes for many years. Grab some on the larger size if you want to mash them – with turnips would be especially tasty! Or smaller ones are perfect for roasting
  • Pie Pumpkins: Did I mention My Grandmother’s Pumpkin Pie Recipe?
  • Winter Squash: Delicata can be cut in half lengthwise and roasted in the oven cut side down until soft – about 30 min. I like to make Squash Rings too.
  • Roma Tomatoes: Can you believe it? Tomatoes in November don’t have all the flavor of a summer tomato, but they’re still a tasty little treat!
  • Turnips: These are the real deal! Purple top turnips are an old school, pre-1880’s heirloom. The name describes them quite well – the roots are white with a striking purple shawl on top. If you grew up traumatized by stinky overcooked turnips – I’d encourage you to give them another try. Start by roasting or sautéing these because when you caramelize turnips, the sweetness shines through. They are also great mashed with potatoes and adventurous cooks might also want to try some Turnip Pickles.

Coming soon… winter frost kissed veggies!! 

Try our Special Thanksgiving Share

Posted by Laura

Winter Vegetable Basket – 47th Avenue Farm CSA

We’re excited to offer a special one-time Try It Out Thanksgiving Sampler Share! If you’ve been wanting to give our CSA a try before signing up for an entire season – and you want ingredients for an amazing Thanksgiving table – this is for you!

Just $50 buys you a feast of local, sustainably farmed and delicious vegetables including Delicata Squash, Sweet Winter Carrots, Brussels Sprouts, Yellow Potatoes, Sugar Pie Pumpkins, Collard Greens and a lot more.

To Pre-Order a Thanksgiving Share at our SE Portland site:

  • Sign up by Monday, November 12th at 10am to guarantee your place.
  • Come get your veggies on Tuesday November 13th from 5-7pm at 6632 SE 47th Ave, Portland
  • All the details are HERE!

 

To Pre-Order a Thanksgiving Share at our Lake Oswego/Luscher Farm site:

  • Sign up by Wednesday, November 14th at 10am to guarantee your place.
  • Come get your veggies on Thursday November 15th from 5-7pm at Luscher Farm, 125 Rosemont Rd, West Linn
  • All the details are HERE!

 

There’s no obligation to sign up for the entire season, but if you find you love our CSA and do decide to join us for fresh vegetables through April, we’ll give you one of our special tote bags as a thank you!

First Winter CSA Share! (Week of Oct 29th, 2018)

Posted by Laura

Welcome to the first Winter CSA pickup of the season! When most people think of fall color they think of leaves turning vibrant red and yellow on deciduous trees around town. That is one of my favorite things about this time of year, but what we have for you this week is just as beautiful, and certainly tastier… lovely golden sweet peppers, rainbow lacinato kale, and the VERY pink Watermelon Radish aka Red Meat, Rose Heart, Stargazer. This radish is an heirloom Chinese Daikon. The round roots are cousin to the turnip and about the same size. Their unassuming greenish white exterior hides a beautiful and shocking pink interior. The flavor is a little bit spicy, peppery, crisp and faintly sweet. They can be eaten raw, diced and roasted with other root veggies or made into beautiful radish pickles.

Lots more great winter veggies to come this season so let your friends know that they can still sign up for our Winter Spring CSA Share which is starting THIS WEEK!

Amazing recipes for Watermelon Radish and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Arugula: Beautiful little bunches!
  • Fennel Bulbs: When the bulbs are sliced raw into salads the fresh anise flavor stands out. The longer the bulbs are cooked, the more subtle the flavor becomes. Try them sautéd with onions and greens or make this Soffrito.
  • Lacinato Rainbow Kale: This beautiful, diverse & tasty kale is from a cross of Lacinato x Redbor hybrid kale. Bred & selected by Frank Morton, seed breeding rock star at Wild Garden Seeds, we’re excited to be growing this diverse population again. It includes the leaf qualities that Lacinato is loved for, overlain with hues of red, purple, and blue-green. In addition to great flavor, we also appreciate that it is more vigorous and cold hardy than most strains of Lacinato. OSSI (Open Source Seed Initiative) Pledged Variety.
  • Garlic: More often than not, dinner at our house starts with some onions & garlic sautéd in olive oil and then we decide what direction to go from there… maybe roast some some peppers and put that over pasta, or cook up a big bunch of greens and put poached eggs on top. So many delicious options!
  • Leeks: These lovely King Richard leeks have beautiful long white shanks. When chopped and sautéed they add a sweet rich onion-like flavor to any number of dishes. One of my favorite ways to feature them is this Leek Galette.
  • Lettuce Heads: These butterhead varieties make a scrumptious salad!
  • Sweet Peppers: A mix of Stocky Red Roasters, Gatherer’s Gold with a few Jimmy Nardello’s mixed in. This will be the last of the sweet peppers for the season. I’m always amazed when they make it until November, but we’ve had a beautiful fall this year!
  • Potatoes: We’ve been growing this variety of ‘Austrian Crescent’ potatoes for many years. A golden crescent-shaped fingerling with a waxy firm texture, it is delicious for salads or roasting. Also known as Kipfel — German for croissant : )
  • Watermelon Radish: Love this!
  • Winter Squash: These Gill’s Golden Pipin squash were developed locally in the mid 1900’s and remain a favorite today. They have a small acorn type shape, beautiful golden color and rich sweet flavor.
  • Hakurei Turnips: Japanese salad turnips are mild enough for, well – salad! The tops make really good cooking greens too.

Coming soon… The Thanksgiving Share!!

 

Meet Your Farmers at Luscher Tonight!!

Posted by Laura

OPEN HOUSE at LUSCHER FARM TODAY (125 Rosemont Rd, West Linn OR): Come meet your farmers, see for yourself how the CSA works and sign up in person…

  • TODAY: Thurs. Oct 25th, 5-7pm

Any NEW members that sign up at the Open House will take home a “mini share” of veggies and a tote bag. Learn more about the Lake Oswego/Luscher Farm pickup location and CSA, or download our Luscher Farm Winter-Spring 2018-19 CSA brochure and order form(PDF).

In Your Share (Week of Oct 15th, 2018)

Posted by Laura

We have hot peppers in the share this week and probably a few more sweet peppers in the share next week. After that, to enjoy the ongoing bounty you’ll need to join us for the WINTER SHARE!! It starts the last week of October and if you haven’t signed up already it’s only a click away…

 

You’ll find recipes for the peppers and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Cauliflower: All the different varieties can be eaten raw or cooked just like regular white cauliflower. I usually roast florets or steaks in cast iron or under the broiler. Simple Italian flavors like olive oil, garlic & red pepper flakes work well or try it with asian spices like soy sauce, ginger and siriachi. No matter what you do, make sure and let the cauli cook with enough heat to get it carmelized on the edges! This recipe is from one of my favorite Sellwood restaurants – Gino’s Cauliflower Pasta. Or try this Cauliflower Cake recipe that one of our shareholders recommended from Plenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi. Or try these variations on the popular East Indian Aloo Gobi.
  • Carrots: Yum!!
  • Fennel Bulbs: These big fennel bulbs are tasty shaved into salads or sautéed. If you head over to the Cook With What You Have website, you’ll find recipes for braised fennel with sweet peppers and this delicious soffrito.
  • Greens: Italian Rapini Greens (aka Sessantina Grossa) are traditionaly cooked, but since the flavor is quite mild I often put them in salad.
  • Leeks: These cool fall evenings are perfect for Potato Leek Soup!
  • Lettuce Heads: The heads are small, beautiful and tasty.
  • Hot Peppers: Choose (in order of hotness) from Jalapeño, Czech Black and Bulgarian Carrot. The latter is a beautiful orange and similar to the heat of a serrano pepper. If you’re a hot pepper fan, then you probably already know about the Scoville Scale that rates the relative heat of all hot peppers.
  • Sweet Peppers: Your choice of several types of sweet pepper this week. We have red and orange sheepnose pimento peppers and Italian roasting peppers. All types have thick walls and sweet flavor. Try them raw, sauteed or stuffed.
  • Potatoes: This golden yellow Nicola variety has a low glycemic index and is high in vitamins & minerals. Of German origin, this potato has a slightly waxy texture which makes it perfect for boiling, steaming or  Potato Leek Soup.
  • Tomatoes: These green tomatoes will make a nice Salsa Verde, a quick chutney and of course they are terrific fried. Check out some international ideas from The Kitchn.
  • Turnips: Tasty little white Hakurei Salad Turnips are sweet and mild enough to be eaten raw or can be roasted with other root veggies.

Coming Soon… The Winter CSA!!

 

In Your Share (Week of Oct 8th, 2018)

Posted by Laura

Time for beautiful and tasty fall cauliflower!! Regular white cauliflower is good stuff, but the purple and orange heads are even more beautiful and nutritious because they contain elevated levels of anthocyanin and beta carotene respectively. Then there is the green fractal romanesco which we love growing – and eating – just because it is so cool looking : )

You’ll find recipes for the cauliflower and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: Yum!!
  • Cauliflower: All the different varieties can be eaten raw or cooked just like regular white cauliflower. I usually roast florets or steaks in cast iron or under the broiler. Simple Italian flavors like olive oil, garlic & red pepper flakes work well or try it with asian spices like soy sauce, ginger and siriachi. No matter what you do, make sure and let the cauli cook long enough to get carmelized on the edges! This recipe is from one of my favorite Sellwood restaurants – Gino’s Cauliflower Pasta. Or try this Cauliflower Cake recipe that one of our shareholders recommended from Plenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi. Or try these variations on the popular East Indian Aloo Gobi.
  • Escarole: Yay – the winter chicory season has started! This Italian variety has slightly bitter leaves that form a dense head. It can be used in salad or sautéed. Many cultures, including the Italians, cook beans & greens together. It is one of my favorite combos and you could use your Roma Tomatoes (and Rapini) in this recipe: Zuppa di Scarola e Fagioli.
  • Italian Rapini Greens: aka Sessantina Grossa these are another traditional Italian green that is traditionally cooked but since the flavor is quite mild, I often put them in salad.
  • Kohlrabi: I usually eat these raw – just peel them and cut into bite sized chunks or make wedges for dipping into humus or your favorite sauce. They can also be roasted or sautéed or mashed with potatoes or grated into fritters/latkes/okonamiyaki.
  • Jimmy Nardello Peppers: This is definitely one of my favorite peppers – the fruit is beautiful red, thin skinned, early ripening and so sweet!! I first heard about these when I was visiting a farm in Pennsylvania at least 15 years ago. It took almost a decade for me to find the seed and start growing them. It is a traditional Italian frying pepper and this particular variety is named for the grandson of the man who brought it from Basilicata, Italy to Connecticut in the 1880’s. In addition to great flavor, I love that it is in the Slow Food Ark of Taste and has such a great story. More info about the people and the pepper can be found here.
  • Kale: This cool fall weather is great for greens!
  • Anaheim & Poblano Peppers: These are slightly spicier and way more interesting than your average green pepper : ) Try this creative variation on the classic Chile Relleno  They are traditional in chile rellenos, but there are lots of other ways to use them. Once they are roasted I often make sauce – coarsely chopped or in the food processor. Try this one with pumpkin seeds or make green harissa.
  • Tomatoes: These roma tomatoes will make a nice addition to pasta or bruschetta or the Zuppa di Scarola e Fagioli. Tomato season is definitely winding down. Hopefully we’ll have green tomatoes next week then we’ll have to wait until next summer for more. Hope you have enjoyed all the interesting and flavorful varieties this season : )
  • Winter Squash: What is the easiest way to cook this cute little single serving size Gill’s Golden Pippin? Just cut in half, lay cut side down on a baking sheet coated with a little olive oil and roast in the oven at 350 until tender. Once they are cooked you can drizzle with with a variety of oils, herbs, nuts and spices. This article has some creative ideas for roasted squash…

 

Coming Soon… The Winter CSA!!

In Your Share (Week of Oct 1st, 2018)

Posted by Laura

Love these little Pimento Peppers!! We tried some new varieties this year and both the red Liebesapfel and the orange Doe Hill are sweet and full of flavor. I also appreciate that these ripen well in our maritime climate without the use of plastic row covers. This type of agricultural plastic mulch is ultimately unsustainable, so we’re always working to use LESS plastic on the farm. It is great to have our local seed companies breeding and selecting varieties that help us do this too.

You’ll find recipes for the sweet peppers and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: Yay for summer carrots!!
  • Cauliflower: The lovely white heads have begun. Coming soon we will also have heads of orange, purple and everyone’s favorite – the weird but beautiful fractal romanesco : )
  • Fennel Bulbs: These big fennel bulbs are tasty shaved into salads or sautéed. If you head over to the Cook With What You Have website, you’ll find recipes for braised fennel with sweet peppers and this delicious soffrito.
  • Hot Peppers: Choose (in order of hotness) from Jalapeño, Czech Black and Bulgarian Carrot. The latter is a beautiful orange and similar to the heat of a serrano pepper. If you’re a hot pepper fan, then you probably already know about the Scoville Scale that rates the relative heat of all hot peppers.
  • Garlic: The name of this variety is Music and it is originally from Italy. The large cloves with beautiful pink skins are pungent but not overpowering.
  • Collard Greens: This cool fall weather is great for greens!
  • Sweet Peppers: Your choice of several types of sweet pepper this week. We have red and orange sheepnose pimento peppers and Italian roasting peppers. All types have thick walls and sweet flavor. Try them raw, sauteed or stuffed. Yum!
  • Fingerling Potatoes: This Austrian Crescent variety is MY FAVE of all the fingerlings we’ve ever grown. The potatoes are waxy and flavorful and roast up really well.
  • Tomatoes: Heirloom & slicing tomatoes are winding down for the season. Hope you have enjoyed all the interesting and flavorful varieties this summer : )

 

Coming Soon… Purple Cauliflower, Winter Squash, Leeks and The Winter CSA!!

In Your Share (Week of Aug 27th 2018)

Posted by Laura

This week we have beautiful Thai basil and cilantro in the share. Might be a good time to make some Salad Rolls or  Green Curry or Rice Noodle Salad. In addition, you will also find the makings for several variations on the salsa theme. Everyone has a favorite recipe for tomatoes, peppers & tomatillos – or try this Corn Salsa – yum!

You’ll find recipes for the herbs and salsa and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: Yay for summer carrots!!
  • Eggplant: Many diverse culinary traditions have embraced the eggplant. It features prominently in Italian, middle eastern, Thai and Indian cuisine – just to name a few. I did not grow up eating much eggplant and only became a convert in my first years of farming. My go to “recipe” for the Japanese types is to cut them lengthwise, drizzle with oil and grill on the BBQ or roast in the oven. I also really like this simple salad – Eggplant in the Moorish Style. You’ll find over 20 recipes for eggplant from many different continents at Cook With What You Have.
  • Peppers: Your choice of  Anaheim and Poblano peppers in the share this week. Both are moderately hot and can be used raw or cooked. Traditionally they are often stuffed & roasted & make great chile rellenos!
  • Herbs: Fresh herbs this week are Thai Basil & Cilantro. See above for some recipe ideas.
  • Sweet Corn: Yum!
  • Summer Squash: This recipe for Courgette Gratin from Lulu’s Provencal Table is one of my favorites. I’m also fond of adding diced & sautéed summer squash to bean chile, scrambled eggs and quesadillas.
  • Tomatillos: This cousin to the tomato is a sprawling plant with distinctive yellow and black flowers that become husk covered fruit. Cultivated since pre-Colombian times, it is used in a variety of Mexican and central american dishes. Often they are roasted for salsa verde, but can be used raw as well.
  • Tomatoes: Heirloom & slicing tomatoes are coming on strong! The HEAT this summer has caused them to have more green shoulder than usual. If you find some hard green tops on the tomato, just cut around it and eat the rest of the delicious fruit. Luckily, the plants have been very productive you’ll get plenty of tomatoes in your share! We’re always experimenting with new varieties, and in some ways it can be good to have these extreme weather events as it shows us which ones make the cut.

 

Coming Soon… More Tasty Sun Ripened Tomatoes!!