Laura Masterson and Patty at 47th Avenue FarmLet nature set your table with fresh and delicious produce, locally farmed in tune with the seasons. With our CSA – now in its 21st season! – you pick up a bag or more of bounty every week for less than $3.50 a day for a half share, or $6.30 a day to feed a family of four.

Shares are limited and move as fast as pole beans, so reserve your space today. To learn more and sign up, start with our How the Farm Works page, or go straight to the info/order pages for our two pickup sites, SE Portland and Lake Oswego.

Look forward to seeing you on Facebook, on Instagram, and at pick-up!

An amazing summer – our 22nd season! – of delicious, responsibly farmed produce is happening soon – sign up today!

Sign up for occasional news from our farm, advance notices on shares and events, special offers, and more!

Getting Oriented

Summer Pick-Up Schedule

47th Ave Farm (SE)
Every week on
Tuesdays 5-7pm,
May 15th – Oct 23rd, 2018

Luscher Farm
Every week on
Thursdays 5-7pm,
May 17th – Oct 25th, 2018

Get signed up today!


 

Southeast
Pick-Up Notes:

We live on a very narrow gravel road, which can easily become congested during pickup. Please take some alternative form of transportation if possible. If you drive, it’s also extremely helpful if you park at least a block away and walk in.

Please bring your own plastic, paper or earth-friendly bags.

Ask us about our bucket exchange program if you’d like to bring your compost to the farm.


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FARM NEWS, NOTES AND (AGRI)CULTURE

Luscher Farm to Table Dinner Tickets on Sale Now!!

Posted by Laura

 

We are so excited to be hosting the one and only farm to table dinner at Luscher Farm this summer! Hope you can join us Sat. Sept 8th from 5-9pm for an evening strolling the back fields and historic barn at Luscher Farm while you sip and dine from a seasonally inspired Farm to Table menu created by local chefs and restaurants.

We’ll begin with local wines, brews, and appetizers as we take a short tour of the fields, to be followed by a family style dinner, dessert and live music in the barn. Many of the ingredients for the meal are grown right at the farm – can’t get more local than that! And music provided by the Dryland Farmers, a great local band.

Tickets are limited and sold out last year so get yours soon!

  • $100 before Aug. 15th
  • $120 after Aug 15th

 

Link to ticket sales:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/twilight-on-the-farm-tickets-47340874831

Special thanks to Chef Pascal Chureau of Allium, Lark Cafe and Field & Vine Events for wisdom and guidance in planning the dinner.

Proceeds from the event provide support for Friends of Luscher Farm which promotes numerous programs and activities at Luscher Farm, including the Luscher School to Farm Internship, Children’s Garden, community supported agriculture (CSA), habitat restoration, trail building, and fundraising for infrastructure development.

A portion of your ticket sale is tax-deductible.

Garden party attire and garden-friendly footwear are encouraged.
Note: Due to the nature of the event we cannot accommodate strict restrictions such as vegan diets, medical diets, or severe food allergies. The menu will be posted closer to the event and you can expect lots of fabulous veggies, locally raised meats and fresh fish.

If you have questions, please email:  luscherfriends@gmail.com

Feel free to forward this to your friends and family who might be interested!

Thank you to our sponsors!

  • City of Lake Oswego
  • Dennis’ 7 Dee’s Garden Center
  • Washington Federal Bank

 

Luscher Farm is located at 125 Rosemont Rd, West Linn OR 97068

In Your Share, Week of July 23rd, 2018

Posted by Laura

We’ve got green beans and several variations on that theme including yellow, purple & romano too!! Over the next couple of weeks you’ll see several varieties of “green” beans in the share. All the different types we grow are sweet and crunchy and they also add a bit of color and diversity to your favorite summer bean recipes.

Provider & Empress – these are our favorite summer green beans and both have pods that are crunchy, tender and sweet.
Blooming Prairie – this is the first year we have grown this beautiful purple bean. It got rave reviews from our friends at Uprising Seeds. If you try some in your share this week, let us know what you think?
Pisarecka Zlutoluske – This unpronounceable name describes a yellow bean from the Pisarky region of the Czech Republic, southeast of Prague. Brought to us from our friends at Adaptive Seeds, the yellow wax beans have pods that are long & slender, like a little round tube. Flavor & texture are sweet & crunchy – very similar to green beans, and the beautiful yellow color holds up quite well even during longer cooking times.
Greencrop – This is a large and flavorful flattened romano type bean. Often green bean marketing has focused on baby beans, but this variety has great “beany” flavor and is tender and tasty even when up to 8″ long.

You’ll find recipes for all kinds of beans and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Green Beans: and purple, yellow & romano too! Try this recipe for Fresh Bean Salad with Olive Tapanade. It is great made ahead and eaten cold – perfect for the current heat wave!
  • Baby New Potatoes: These are beautiful and delicate little yellow potatoes. Often called new or creamer potatoes – these are the first potatoes to form on the plant and they have a lovely sweet flavor and creamy texture – perfect for boiling or steaming. The skin is so thin it doesn’t even need to be peeled!
  • Cucumber: Slicing cukes are so good on salad this time of year! In the mix are two varieties of green and also a white variety called Silver Slicer.
  • Lettuce Heads: Tropicana and Summer Crisp lettuce are some of the few varieties that can take the heat and still come through tasting sweet and refreshing. Enjoy those summer salads!
  • Herbs: Fresh herb this week is Italian parsley. This will be great with roasted potatoes or check out Cook With What You Have for more recipe ideas!
  • Summerfest Greens: Beautiful japaneese greens are flavorful but not spicy and can be added to salad or sautéed.
  • Spring Onions: We know it’s summer, but we wanted to share these onions that still have their beautiful greens. Red Tropea is an elongated Italian sweet onion and Sierra Blanca is a mexican white onion. Both have lovely fresh tops that can be used like a green onion – raw or sautéed.
  • Summer Squash: This recipe for Courgette Gratin from Lulu’s Provencal Table is one of my favorites. I’m also fond of adding diced & sautéed summer squash to bean chile, scrambled eggs and quesadillas.

 

Coming soon… Heat Wave!

Green Beans with Olive Tapanade

Posted by Laura

Green Beans with Olive Tapanade
From Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone
By Deborah Madison

This recipe also works great with yellow, purple or romano beans!

Cook beans uncovered in salted boiling water until slightly resilient to the tooth. Start tasting them after 3-4 minutes, though they may take longer. When they’re done, drain, then rinse with cold water to stop the cooking.

Toss 1lb beans with 1/3 cup Hot & Spicy Tapanade

Hot and Spicy Tapanade
1/2 lb mixed olives, mostly Kalamata
1/4 cup capers, rinsed
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
2-3 cloves garlic, to taste, finely chopped
Grated zest and juice of 1 large lemon
1 teaspoon chopped green peppercorns, drained
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes

If the olives are excessively salty, rinse them in several changes of water. Remove the pits, then chop them by hand and mix with the remaining ingredients. Stored in the refrigerator, the tapanade will keep well for up to 2 weeks.

In Your Share, July 9th edition

Posted by Laura

Beautiful baby potatoes this week have a delicate thin skin and creamy sweet texture. They’ll make a nice potato salad with the dill or a Salade Niçoise – perfect for these hot days!

You’ll find recipes for potatoes, dill and everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Beautiful Baby Potatoes: These are beautiful and delicate little yellow potatoes. Often called new or creamer potatoes – these are the first potatoes to form on the plant and they have a lovely sweet flavor and creamy texture – perfect for boiling or steaming.
  • Lettuce Heads: So happy to have summer salad!
  • Herbs: Fresh herbs this week will likely be dill or cilantro. Try the dill with new potatoes and cilantro with the Calypso beans. Or check out Cook With What You Have for more recipe ideas!
  • Garlic: I really like this variety, Music, because it has mostly large easy to peel cloves inside big beautiful bulbs. It also has high levels if allicin – an antioxidant common to most garlic. Good for you and tasty too!
  • Summeriest Greens: Beautiful japaneese greens are flavorful but not spicy and can be added to salad or sautéed.
  • Heirloom Dry Beans: We’ll have several varieties available for you to choose from this week. Calypso aka Orca beans have a striking black and white pattern on them but can be used in any recipe that calls for black beans. Jachob’s Cattle bean is a pretty red & white bean that was originally raised by Maine’s Passamaquoddy Indians.
  • Summer Squash: This recipe for Courgette Gratin from Lulu’s Provencal Table is one of my favorites. I’m also fond of adding diced & sautéed summer squash to bean chile, scrambled eggs and quesadillas.
  • Napa (Chinese) Cabbage: Nice dense full size heads! Use it to make a traditional kimchi, sauté it in stir fry, or forget about tradition and try your favorite coleslaw recipe with it : )

 

Coming soon… Green Beans!

In Your Share (July 2nd edition)

Posted by Laura

Hope you have a happy 4th of July!! This holiday has many happy memories for me including good times with family & friends, usually celebrated outdoors, and always with lots of good food. If you want to celebrate with summer salads, the fennel in your share this week adds a nice touch!

You’ll find recipes for fennel and everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Joi Choi: A beautiful and tasty brassica, it is classified as a B. rapa var. chinensis. This species also includes a wide variety of other roots & greens from tatsoi to turnips to napa cabbage. This choi is one of my favorites! It has broad white stems that are mild and crunchy with tender dark green leaves. It makes a terrific addition to stir fry or try this Soba Noodle Salad with Choi.
  • Fennel: Try this Fennel & Salad Turnip Slaw with tacos or sauté chopped bulbs with onions into a tasty cartelized Soffrito.
  • Lettuce Heads: So happy to have summer salad!
  • Mustard Greens: Beautiful purple Dragon’s Tongue greens make a spicy addition to salad and have less heat, but still plenty of flavor when sautéed.
  • Dried Cayenne Peppers: We grow a variety of hot peppers in the summer time, but this is the best one by far for drying. It has a thin skin and the meat of the pepper is flavorful and spicy. You can add a whole one to a pot of soup or stew – or grind it up and make your own DIY Hot Pepper Flakes.
  • Pea Shoot Microgreens: These little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Summer Squash: This recipe for Courgette Gratin from Lulu’s Provencal Table is one of my favorites. I’m also fond of adding diced & sautéed summer squash to bean chile, scrambled eggs and quesadillas.
  • Hakurei Turnips: More tasty salad turnips this week. Don’t forget to cook the greens too!

 

Coming soon… Rainbow Chard!

In Your Share (June 25th edition)

Posted by Laura

It is time for summer squash! Whether you call them courgettes or calabacitas – this much maligned summer vegetable is one of my favorites. Little baby squash can be steamed or sautéed whole. Medium sized squash can be sliced into little rounds and make a lovely summer squash gratin. Larger squash can be grated into tasty zucchini bread. There is quite a bit of diversity in the summer squash family. Dark green zucchini’s are the most common, but we grow Italian striped green zucchini, yellow zucchini, yellow crookneck, & several colors of patty pan squash. Enjoy!

You’ll find recipes for summer squash and everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Napa (Chinese) Cabbage: So excited to see these beautiful dense heads! Use it to make a traditional kimchi, sauté it in stir fry, or try your favorite coleslaw recipe with it.
  • Joi Choi: A beautiful and tasty brassica, it is classified as a B. rapa var. chinensis. This species also includes a wide variety of other roots & greens from tatsoi to turnips to napa cabbage. This choi is one of my favorites! It has broad white stems that are mild and crunchy with tender dark green leaves. It makes a terrific addition to stir fry or try this Soba Noodle Salad with Choi.
  • Kale: This heirloom English flat leaf kale is tender and tasty!
  • Lettuce Heads: So happy to have summer salad!
  • Spring Onions: Enjoy them while they last and don’t forget to use the greens too.
  • Popcorn: The Amish Butter is back! If you love real popcorn with real flavor then you are in for a treat : ) We were first introduced to this variety by Anthony & Carol Boutard at Ayers Creek Farm. The seed is now available from Uprising and it is a surprisingly versatile variety – it can also be ground into polenta, cornbread or made into masa. Pop it on the cob in the microwave (in a brown paper bag, max 3 min) or take the kernels off the cop and pop it any way you choose. Here is my favorite stovetop recipe for popcorn.
  • Spicy Radish Microgreens: These little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Summer Squash: This recipe for Courgette Gratin from Lulu’s Provencal Kitchen is one of my favorites. I’m also fond of adding diced & sautéed summer squash to bean chile, scrambled eggs and quesadillas.
  • Hakurei Turnips: More tasty salad turnips this week. Don’t forget to cook the greens too!

 

Coming soon… Crunchy Cucumbers! 

In Your Share (June 18th edition)

Posted by Laura

The greens are looking good this week! Across the world, cultures use dark leafy greens in a myriad of creative recipes. This week we have at least two continents represented with Joi Choi from Asia & Cimi di Rapa from Europe. These greens may be worlds apart geographically, but botanically they are closely related. As part of the Brassica genus, both likely decendended from the same 3 ancestral species. Included in this genus are important food crops, oilseed crops and also some frustrating weeds. Even just within the food crops there is an incredible amount of diversity as plants have been selected for edible roots, stems, leaves, buds, flowers and seeds. Most of the brassicas are extremely nutritious and often have antioxidant, anticancer and immune enhancing properties.

You’ll find recipes for greens and everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Joi Choi: A beautiful and tasty brassica, it is classified as a B. rapa var. chinensis. This species also includes a wide variety of other roots & greens from tatsoi to turnips to napa cabbage. This choi is one of my favorites! It has broad white stems that are mild and crunchy with tender dark green leaves. It makes a terrific addition to stir fry or try this Soba Noodle Salad with Choi.
  • Fava Beans: Beautiful, early, flavorful and fun! This time of year you don’t have to double peel if you don’t want to. In fact, my favorite way to cook these is whole and in the pod. Try this Fresh Grilled Fava Beans recipe.
  • Baby Lettuce Heads: Let the summer salads begin!
  • Spring Garlic: Lovely plump fresh garlic bulbs for you in the share today. Left in the field, it will become storage garlic – but it isn’t there yet. Use these in any recipe that calls for regular garlic but since they do not have the dried wrapper around the bulb if needs to be stored in the fridge and eaten sooner rather than later.
  • Spring Onions: These are tender and tasty! We call them spring onions to differentiate them from storage onions. This time of year the spring onions have beautiful greens on them which can be used like just like a green onion. You may see red, yellow and white onions – or a mix of all three – in your share this week
  • Sweet Pea Microgreens: These little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Red Round Radish: These are super tasty this time of year. Later in the season they can get pretty spicy, but these just have a little zing to them. Great in salads or as a snack on the crudite plate. Or try this Radish Butter spread.
  • Cimi di Rapa:These greens go by many names aka Sessantina Grossa, Spring Raab, Rabe or Rapini and are classified as B. rapa var. rapa. Common throughout the southern Mediterranean, especially in Italy, Spain and Portugal, they are traditionally boiled or sautéed with olive oil and hot pepper and often served as a side alongside pork or over pasta. My sister worked for a summer in Bari, Italy many years ago and I love this simple pasta – Orecciette with Cimi di Rapa – from that region.

Coming soon… Happy Solstice! 

In Your Share (June 11th, 2018 edition)

Posted by Laura

Let the sugar snap peas begin! We seeded peas early this spring, cultivated them several times with the electric tractor and horses to keep the weeds at bay, then built a sturdy trellis for them. The vines have been climbing vigorously up the trellis and flowering profusely and now we have the first plump ripe pods ready for share this week – yay!

The sugar snap peas we grow have a sweet crunchy edible pod with tasty sweet peas inside. The whole pod and peas are meant to be eaten together. They are usually eaten raw, but can also be steamed or sautéed. Like sweet corn, these peas are best eaten asap otherwise the sugar in the peas will turn starchy over time. Don’t confuse your sugar snap peas (sweet peas, plump sweet pod) with shelling peas (tasty peas, pod is not edible, aka green peas) or snow peas (undeveloped peas, flat pods, often found in asian cuisine). I’m not opposed to the other kinds but sugar snap peas are my favorite and I hope you enjoy them too : )

Last week my friend Walt Bernard from Workhorse Workshops in Dorena, OR delivered my new horse drawn plow! He helped me get it set up and we started plowing up a field with some thick cover crops on it. I’m really looking forward to integrating this tool into the farm fieldwork rotation. I posted some photos of the team in action on the website and on Facebook.

You’ll find recipes everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Baby Lettuce Heads: Let the summer salads begin!
  • Spring Garlic: Lovely plump fresh garlic bulbs for you in the share today. Spring garlic is harvested after the bulbs have formed, but before the cloves are individually wrapped. Left in the field, it will become storage garlic – but it isn’t there yet. Use these in any recipe that calls for regular garlic but since they do not have the dried wrapper around the bulb if needs to be stored in the fridge and eaten sooner rather than later.
  • Spring Onions: These are tender and tasty! We call them spring onions to differentiate them from storage onions. This time of year the spring onions have beautiful greens on them which can be used like just like a green onion. You may see red, yellow and white onions – or a mix of all three – in your share this week
  • Zesty Daikon Microgreens: These little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Red Round Radish: These are super tasty this time of year. Later in the season they can get pretty spicy, but these just have a little zing to them. Great in salads or as a snack on the crudite plate. Or try this Radish Butter spread.
  • Spinach: This crop likes the cool weather we’ve been having and the leaves are thick, succulent and deeply savoyed. This would make a beautiful spinach salad or can be sautéed.
  • Hakuri Salad Turnips: These look like giant white radish, but the flavor is sweet crunchy and mild. As the name implies, they can definitely be eaten raw or roasted. Greens are good too – cook them up alone or with other greens like spinach.

 

Coming soon… more Sugar Snap Peas!