Laura Masterson and Patty at 47th Avenue FarmLet nature set your table with fresh and delicious produce, locally farmed in tune with the seasons. With our CSA – now in its 22nd season! – you pick up a bag or more of bounty every week for less than $3.75 a day for a half share, or $6.82 a day to feed a family of four.

Shares are limited and move as fast as pole beans, so reserve your space today. To learn more and sign up, start with our How the Farm Works page, or go straight to the info/order pages for our two pickup sites, SE Portland and Lake Oswego.

Look forward to seeing you on Facebook, on Instagram, and at pick-up!

An amazing summer of delicious, responsibly farmed produce is happening soon – sign up today!

Sign up for occasional news from our farm, advance notices on shares and events, special offers, and more!

Getting Oriented

Summer Pick-Up Schedule

47th Ave Farm (SE)
Every week on
Tuesdays 5-7pm,
May 14th – Oct 22nd, 2019

Luscher Farm
Every week on
Thursdays 5-7pm,
May 16th – Oct 24th, 2019

Get signed up today!


Southeast
Pick-Up Notes:

We live on a very narrow gravel road, which can easily become congested during pickup. Please take some alternative form of transportation if possible. If you drive, it’s also extremely helpful if you park at least a block away and walk in.

Please bring your own plastic, paper or earth-friendly bags. We can re-use clean cardboard egg cartons.

Ask us about our bucket exchange program if you’d like to bring your compost to the farm.


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FARM NEWS, NOTES AND (AGRI)CULTURE

In Your Share (May 20th edition)

Posted by Laura

May is a busy month at the farm! We’re running full steam ahead seeding, transplanting & weeding our summer crops. Happily there was a little rain the last few days so that made irrigation easy. The crew has been planting sweet corn, winter squash & red tropea onions. In the greenhouse, we have more plantings of lettuce, broccoli, cauliflower & fennel ready to go. Busy = Bountiful Baskets through the summer!

Lots of good stuff in the share this week! The Hakurei Japanese salad turnips are sweet & tasty – use them raw or roasted. Don’t forget to sauté the turnip greens too. The dried cayenne peppers add a nice kick to a variety of recipes. Use a one whole to a pot of soup then pull it out when it has added enough heat.  Or make homemade dried pepper flakes by chopping up a few cayennes then sprinkle on pizza or pasta. The garlic scapes have just started and are very tender with a mild garlic flavor. They’ll be good roasted whole or can be cut into a small dice and sautéed.

You’ll find recipes for hakurei turnips, cayenne peppers, garlic scapes and the rest of the veggies in your share at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your Access Key in the most recent farm email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

We still have a few spots available in the CSA so feel free to let your friends know they can still get in on the bounty with a pro-rated Summer CSA share share starting next week.

This week your share may include…

  • Amish Butter Popcorn: Real popcorn with real flavor! We were first introduced to this variety by Ayers Creek Farm. Seed is now available from Uprising Seed and it is surprisingly versatile – can also be ground into polenta, cornbread or made into masa. Pop it on the cob in the microwave (in a brown paper bag, max 3 min) or take the kernels off the cop and pop it any way you choose.
  • Green Garlic: Lovely plump garlic stalks for you in the share today. Green garlic is planted alongside our storage garlic in the fall. It grows a vigorous root system through the winter, and pushes up its little green stalks in the spring. We harvest green garlic now – when the greens are tender and before it has much of a bulb.  Similar to leeks – the white part is most tender, but the green tops have good garlic flavor too. Enjoy these little beauties while they last!
  • Garlic Scapes: These are the stems and small flower buds of the garlic plant. They can be chopped up and used in almost any dish that calls for regular garlic. I also like to roast them whole with a bit of salt and olive oil. Just put them under the broiler or on on the BBQ until they begin to darken and wilt. Makes for fun finger food!
  • Red Spring Onions: We call them spring onions to differentiate them from storage onions. This time of year the spring onions have beautiful leaves & stems on them which can be used like just like a green onion. This variety has a nice red blush!
  • Red Potato: These Red Desiree potatoes are great roasted, steamed or boiled.
  • Pea Microgreens: These little greens pack a nice bit of sweet pea flavor and make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches. They also have even more nutrition per ounce than their full grow grown counterparts.
  • Dried Cayenne Peppers: These traditional dried peppers are spicy, but not insanely hot. This is the variety most often used for red pepper flakes and DIY flakes are easy – just make sure you wear gloves or wash your hands carefully after chopping all the peppers. You can also toss whole peppers into soups and stews – a simple way to add some spice to whatever you have on the stovetop or in the crockpot.
  • Hakurei Salad Turnips: The golf ball size turnips are mild & crunchy with a hint of sweetness. Use them raw as a snack or sliced into salad. The greens are also tasty and mild enough for use in salad, or can be sautéed.

Coming soon… French Breakfast & Cheriette Radish

 

First Summer CSA Pickup for 2019!!

Posted by Laura

Chard at 47th Avenue FarmWelcome to the first Summer CSA Pickup of the 2019 season!! We have had beautiful weather for planting the last few weeks. Despite some challenges earlier this spring – the late heavy snow in March and terrible April flooding – we still have plenty of veggies to offer for the first pickup. In your share this week you’ll see spring planted crops like hakurei turnips, overwintering crops like sweet onions and garlic, and storage crops like potatoes and heirloom dry beans. Thanks to the huge diversity we grow, there’s always plenty of veggies to keep the farm pantry full. All this should make for bountiful baskets throughout the summer!!

And what’s for dinner tonight? Well since today’s a little drizzly, it might be nice to make some lively spring soup using our potatoes, green garlic, chard (pictured above), and a sprinkling of our radish microgreens to warm all the nooks and crannies. Or maybe roasted onions and turnips, nudged toward the exotic with turmeric and chickpeas. Or a quick coconut milk curry featuring our creamy Tetsukabuto Squash…

You’ll find recipes for all these fabulous fixins’ and more at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your Access Key in the most recent farm email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

We still have a few spots available in the CSA so feel free to let your friends know they can still get in on the bounty with a prorated Summer CSA share share starting next week.

This week your share may include…

  • Dry Beans: This Jacob’s Cattle variety is an heirloom from Prince Edward Island. Listed on the Slow Food Arc of Taste, it is favored by many cooks as a baked bean because of the rich and nutty flavor. It also holds up well to long cooking.
  • Green Garlic: Lovely plump garlic stalks for you in the share today. Green garlic is planted alongside our storage garlic in the fall. It grows a vigorous root system through the winter, and pushes up its little green stalks in the spring. We harvest green garlic now – when the greens are tender and before it has much of a bulb.  Similar to leeks – the white part is most tender, but the green tops have good garlic flavor too. Enjoy these little beauties while they last!
  • Sweet Spring Walla Onions: We call them spring onions to differentiate them from storage onions. This time of year the spring onions have beautiful leaves & stems on them which can be used like just like a green onion. This particular variety is one of the sweetest!
  • Yellow Potato: These yellow Nicola potatoes are great roasted, steamed or boiled.
  • Radish Microgreens: Zesty little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches. They also have even more nutrition per ounce than their full grow grown counterparts.
  • Tetsukabuto Squash: So many people think of “winter” squash as something to be eaten only in the fall. We’d like to expand your understanding of that concept! Squash like the Japanese Tetsukabuto are metabolic miracles – with little to no special treatment, they hold through the long winter, spring and into the early summer. Tetsu is not commonly grown or eaten in the US, although it is popular in its country of origin (Japan) and has also been wildly popular in Brazil since the 1960’s. Try it and we think you’ll like it!
  • Hakurei Salad Turnips: The golf ball size turnips are mild & crunchy with a hint of sweetness. Use them raw as a snack or sliced into salad. The greens are also tasty and mild enough for use in salad, or can be sautéed.
  • Cherry Tomato Starts: Since the tastiest cherry tomatoes are those picked straight off the plant and popped directly into your month – we’re sending you home with a baby plant. This way, you can grow your own. You’ll be amazed at how easy these are to grow – they just need a little bit of sun, occasional water, and voila! In a few months you’ll have yummy little fruit on your doorstep. These will also grow just fine in a pot – at least 5 gal or larger. Trellis them to keep more fruit off the ground – or just pick the ones off the top.

Coming soon… A Whole Summer Full of Yummy Veggies!

 

Our Veggies are on TV!

Posted by Laura

Check out this great interview with Katherine Deumling from Cook With What You Have using OUR VEGGIES on KATU TV. The host of the show was obviously impressed with (and surprised  by!) how sweet our winter kohlrabi is. Of course, our CSA members are not surprised at all – they know that our frost-kissed winter produce is always delicious.

Katherine Deumling

What’s in the CSA Box?

Posted by Laura

If you’re wondering how much delicious produce CSA shareholders take home every pick-up, check out a whole share harvest tally from one of our past seasons:

Winter CSA Share Tally 2018-19

Summer CSA Share Tally 2018

Winter CSA Share Tally 2017-18

Summer CSA Share Tally 2017

Winter CSA Share Tally 2016-17

Summer CSA Share Tally 2016

Winter CSA Share Tally 2015-16

Summer CSA Share Tally 2015

Winter CSA Share Tally 2014-15

Summer CSA Share 2014


Remember, each year is different, but these Harvest Tally forms will give you an idea of what kinds of things may be in the share from year to year.

In Your Share (Week of Feb 18th, 2019)

Posted by Laura

Time for tasty winter carrots! They were ready to go for the last CSA pickup but it was impossible to dig them out of the frozen ground during the snowpocalypse. All that cold weather may have been challenging for us, but it makes the winter veggies – like carrots – even sweeter.

Amazing recipes for everything in your share are available to members at our website and at  Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Brussel Sprouts: Perhaps you’re getting tired of my favorite One Pot Wonder with brussel sprouts, pesto and gnocchi? If so, then check out CWWYH’s new website!! There you’ll find at least 2 dozen tasty recipes for sprouts.
  • Carrots: Yum!!!
  • Celery Root: These are great with potatoes and can be roasted, mashed, or fried into chips. Try some of the ideas here and check out more than two dozen recipes for celery root/celeriac at Cook With What You Have
  • Collard Greens: Try these in salad, soups or braised. This recipe for Collard & Pickled Apple Salad is one of my favorites.
  • Onions: I used to take the yellow onions for granted. A basic, ubiquitous, staple crop that is relatively easy to grow and nothing to get excited about. Well, maybe not! Though many varieties look similar on the outside, agronomic qualities like disease resistance, productivity, flavor, and long storageability can vary widely. Since my favorite yellow onion, Copra, disappeared from the market a few years ago it has been very challenging to find a replacement that has all those good qualities. In 2018 we grew two different onions, hoping that one of them would successfully replace Copra. The variety recommended by most seed companies is Patterson. And a locally developed open pollinated variety is called Newberg. We’re growing both again for the 2019 season then we’ll hopefully have a winner. Continually testing new crops and varieties is an important part of bringing you the best veggies possible : )
  • Popcorn: The Amish Butter is back! If you love real popcorn with real flavor then you are in for a treat. We were first introduced to this variety by Anthony & Carol Boutard at Ayers Creek Farm. The seed is now available from Uprising and it is a surprisingly versatile variety – it can also be ground into polenta, cornbread or made into masa. Pop it on the cob in the microwave (in a brown paper bag, max 3 min) or take the kernels off the cop and pop it any way you choose. Here is my favorite stovetop recipe for popcorn.
  • Potatoes: Tasty purple skinned Harvest Moon has golden yellow flesh and is great roasted or mashed with celeriac.
  • Red Dutch Shallots: These small bulbs have a rosy-brown skin and pale pink interior. The skins are easy to peel and they are generally milder than most onions. They can be sautéed and used just like an onion, or try something special like this Braised Shallots or Pok Pok’s Crispy Fried Shallot topping.
  • Winter Squash: Assorted varieties to choose from this week… “Angel Hair” spaghetti, “Doran Round” butternut, and “Winter Sweet.” These are all tasty little squash! The spaghetti is self explanatory and goes well with pasta sauce. The Doran Round is a Dutch butternut that has a sweet smooth texture and stores longer than a traditional butternut. And Winter Sweet is a lovely round grey-green squash that has a sweet flakey texture with nice depth of flavor.

Coming soon… Purple Sprouting Broccoli!! 

Race & Equity in Farming

Posted by Laura

I’ve been on quite a journey the last few years learning about race & equity issues including formal trainings with CEI, my own reading, and conversations with white friends & allies. Only recently have I had the opportunity to bring that lens to my farming community. It was great to meet so many POC farmers last week at the Farming While Black panel discussion event. Looking forward to continuing the conversations we started there and hopefully finding some opportunities to collaborate. Just thought I’d post a few resources that have been helpful to me in case folks are interested in learning more…

Books:

  • Waking Up White, Debbie Irving
  • Mindful of Race, Ruth King
  • White Fragility, Robin DiAngelo
  • The New Jim Crow, Michelle Alexander

 

Farming & Food Justice

 

Lots more to learn! Look forward to updating the list on a regular basis!!

 

In Your Share (Week of Feb 4th, 2019)

Posted by Laura


Some folks had a snow day this week, but not your farmers! We harvested a few things ahead of the storm, braved the icy roads this morning, and washed all the veggies outside with 33 degree water. And it was uphill both ways : ) Just kidding on the last one, but serious about the rest. If you see the farm crew at pickup tonight give them an extra high five. Winter farming is not for the faint of heart and they busted it out this week!

Lots more veggies to come this season so let your friends know that they can still sign up for a prorated Winter/Spring CSA Share.

Amazing recipes for everything in your share are available to members at our website and at  Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Brussel Sprouts: Perhaps you’re getting tired of me mentioning my favorite One Pot Wonder with brussel sprouts, pesto and gnocchi? If so, then check out CWWYH’s new website!! There you’ll find at least 2 dozen tasty recipes for sprouts.
  • Cabbage, Savoy: Beautiful wrinkly crinkly leaved savoy cabbages in your share this week. This is my favorite cabbage to use for Roasted Cabbage Wedges. Since it is not a super tight head, more of the leaves are exposed to the heat and get carmelized easier. Yum!
  • Brassica Medley: Love those dark winter greens! We’ve harvested several varieties of kale & kale tops this week for you to chose from.
  • Leeks: I’m loving the leeks this time of year. Chop and sauté the tender white stem and add them to almost dish that calls for cooked onions. Add the darker tops to soup stock. Or go with a more traditional Potato Leek Soup or make a leek galette.
  • Onions, Red: I first made this quick pickle to put on tacos, but now I use it on everything from salads to roasted veggies. The recipe is super simple to make and I love how it brightens up the flavor of rich winter foods.
  • Potatoes: Tasty yellow Nicola is great roasted or mashed with turnips.
  • Radish, Black Spanish: This can be cut into chunks and roasted with other roots, or thinly sliced into coins and baked with olive oil.
  • Turnips, Purple Top: This is a turnip your grandmother would recognize! Good roasted & mashed. Also good Au Gratin with potatoes and/or winter squash.
  • Winter Squash: The tried and true butternut squash : )

Coming soon… Purple Sprouting Broccoli!! 

In Your Share, Dec 17th 2018 edition

Posted by Laura

Amazing holiday recipes – from the most elaborate to super simple – are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

Happy Holidays and look forward to seeing everyone in the New Year!!

This week your share may include…

  • Brussel Sprouts: These are tall stalks of sprouts! And they come with a little disclaimer… Sprouts are one of the most difficult veggies to grow. This year, the plants were big and beautiful, but the sprouts definitely sustained some damage. Luckily, looks aren’t everything! Pop the sprouts off the stalk and peel a few layers off and they’ll be good to go. Sprouts are great roasted or shaved thin into salad. And I always have to include this super simple recipe for them with Gnocchi & Pesto.
  • Celeriac: is a cousin to the more familiar celery plant and has a similar flavor but distinctly different texture. I love it in vegetable soup or hardier stews and one of my favorite winter salads is this Remoulade from David Lebovitz. Or check out any of the two dozen recipes for celeriac at Cook With What You Have.
  • Mixed Chicory – Sugarloaf & Chioggia di Variegata: I love these complex chicory flavor in salads with strong dressings – think blue cheese crumbles, anchovies or bright lemon vinaigrette with garlic. If you sauté the greens the flavor is much more mellow which can also be nice.
  • Collards: Love those dark winter greens! I usually just chop and sauté, but these Citrus Collard Greens are a nice way to dress them up for the holidays.
  • Garlic: More often than not, dinner at our house starts with some onions & garlic sautéd in olive oil and then we decide what direction to go from there… they’re good with roasted roots or cook up a big bunch of greens and put poached eggs on top. So many delicious options!
  • Kohlrabi: My favorite way to eat this is raw. Cut the skin off, chop into finger sized sticks and grab your favorite dip. Also makes a nice addition to winter root roasts.
  • Leeks: I’m loving the leeks this time of year. Chop and sauté the tender white stem and add them to almost dish that calls for cooked onions. Add the darker tops to soup stock. Or go with a more traditional Potato Leek Soup or make a Leek Galette.
  • Red Potatoes: These ‘Desiree Red’ potatoes are great roasted with rosemary – super simple and so good.
  • Red Onions: Yum!
  • Pie Pumpkins: Did I mention My Grandmother’s Pumpkin Pie Recipe? These also make a great quick bread or pumpkin muffins.
  • Winter Squash: Delicata can be cut in half lengthwise and roasted in the oven cut side down until soft – about 30 min. I also like to make Squash Rings.

Coming soon… Happy New Year!!