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Archived posts for the ‘Farm News’ Category

In Your Share (Dec 11th edition)

By Laura

We’ve had quite a few frosty days on the farm lately! Cold temperatures can be challenging for the harvest crew, but as long as the low’s stay in the 20’s or above most of our winter crops will do just fine. In fact many crops, like the sugarloaf chicory in the photo, will get sweeter with the cold weather. How does this work? The biochemistry of plants and many years of winter variety trials on the farm both work together to bring you some of the best tasting veggies in town! I explain some of my tips and tricks for winter farming in the post I wrote last year when it was even colder and snowing. You’ll find amazing recipes for chicory and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

Let your friends know that they can still get in on the CSA. It’s easy to sign up for a pro-rated Winter Spring CSA Share online!

This week your share may include…

  • Brussel Sprouts: Tasty sprouts are still on the stalks. Remove the sprouts, trim off a few leaves, then they are ready for roasting or slaw.  
  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots – yum!
  • Cauliflower: This is the first time we’ve been able to offer cauliflower in December! We had a bumper crop of fall cauliflower and we have extended the season by harvesting the heads before the frost set in and storing them in the walk-in. I’m looking forward to cauliflower steaks and curried cauliflower soup : )
  • Celery Root/Celeriac: is a cousin to the more familiar celery plant and has a similar flavor but distinctly different texture. I love it in vegetable soup or hardier stews and one of my favorite winter salads is this Remoulade from David Lebovitz. Or check out any of the two dozen recipes for celeriac at Cook With What You Have.
  • Sugarloaf Borca Chicory: Another great winter green! These long loose romaine type heads have a pleasing balance of sweet and bitter flavors. I love them in salads where they provide a nice complement to stronger flavors like capers & lemon, or blue cheese & balsamic vinegar. Also known as Pan di Zucchero in Italy, and Zukerhut in Germany, they are traditionally grilled or sautéed. Cooking reduces the bitterness and adds complex carmelized flavors. You’ll find almost 3 dozen recipe ideas for chicory at CookWithWhatYouHave.
  • Garlic: I usually sauté garlic with onions as the base for any number of culinary adventures. I’ve been really enjoying a little raw garlic in my kale salads and I’ve also been roasting whole peeled cloves with some of the root veggies. Yum!
  • Black Tuscan Kale: There are many variations on the winter kale salad theme, but this recipe was the gateway for me and it is still one of my favorites.
  • Onions: Italian cippolini (pronounced chip-oh-lee-knee) are sweet and mild. The baby onions are most common at the store, but we grew some BIG ones this year. They make amazing carmelized onions and are also good cut into chunks and roasted with root veggies.
  • Potatoes: This yellow variety is tasty roasted alone or with other root crops.
  • Purple Top Turnip: These are a great addition to roasted root veggies – especially with carrots & potatoes. Cut everything into similar sized chunks, mix with olive oil, spread onto a baking sheet and add seasonings. Salt, pepper, rosemary, oregano & thyme are all classic flavors that combine well with roasted root veggies. Turnips also make a nice winter mash with or without potatoes and/or cauliflower.
  • Delicata Squash & Pie Pumpkins: I love pumpkin pie for the holidays! My favorite recipe is still my grandmothers. When I first grew pie pumpkins almost 20 years ago, this recipe was the only one I could find that actually called for fresh cooked pumpkins rather than canned. These days there are lots of versions out there. This is my sister’s favorite recipe which is lactose free and uses coconut milk. Can’t have too many pies – they all disappear quickly when my family gets together this time of year : )

 

Coming soon… Happy Holidays!

 

In Your Share (Nov 27th edition)

By Laura

Beautiful escarole in the share this week! I love all the winter crops but it it especially nice to have a few more tender greens this time year. The escarole is a french type that tastes almost like a winter romaine lettuce. All the leaves are good, but the tender heart is especially tasty!  You’ll find amazing recipes for escarole and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

Let your friends know that they can still get in on the CSA. It’s easy to sign up for a pro-rated Winter Spring CSA Share online!

This week your share may include…

  • Beets: Sweet winter beets – yum!
  • Cauliflower: Big beautiful heads : )
  • Escarole: A lovely and tender winter green that can be used in salad or sautéed.
  • Garlic: I usually sauté garlic with onions as the base for any number of culinary adventures. I’ve been really enjoying homemade tzatziki with some raw garlic and I also roasted a bunch of whole peeled cloves with beets & potatoes. Yum!
  • Kale: Red Ursa kale is a beautiful and tasty red russian type that is tender enough for salad, but also holds up well when cooked. It is an award willing kale and a hometown favorite bred locally by our friends at Wild Garden Seed.
  • Kohlrabi: Winter varieties are growing bigger and better every day! Don’t be intimidated by the size – they are tender and sweet all the way through this time of year. I like them raw with (or without) your favorite dipping sauce. They can also be grated or shaved into salads or roasted with other root veggies.
  • Leeks: One of my favorite winter veggies! I substitute them for onions in almost any dish and sometimes make a special leek recipe like this galette.
  • Onions: Italian cippolini (pronounced chip-oh-lee-knee) are sweet and mild. The baby onions are most common at the store, but we grew some BIG ones this year. They make amazing carmelized onions and are also good cut into chunks and roasted with root veggies.
  • Potatoes: This red variety is tasty roasted alone or with other root crops.
  • Watermelon Radish: I love that this Radish, so humble looking on the outside, is shocking pink on the inside! They have a sweet peppery radish flavor, but are usually more mild than a little red radish. They are a good source of Vitamin C and calcium and they are are full of healthy isothiocyanates.  This radish is actually an heirloom daikon, so can be used similarly. The color often fades when cooked so to preserve that gorgeous magenta color, use them raw or pickled. Try this super simple Radish Salad with Apples.
  • Winter Squash: What is the easiest way to cook Butternut & Gill’s Golden Pippin? Just cut in half, lay cut side down on a baking sheet coated with a little olive oil and roast in the oven at 350 until tender. Once they are cooked you can drizzle with with a variety of oils, herbs, nuts and spices. This article has some creative ideas for roasted squash…

Coming soon… The Solstice Share!

 

In Your Share (Nov 13th edition)

By Laura

We put together the share this week with Thanksgiving in mind. Whether you are home for the holidays or not, there are lots of good things to make with all the veggies. We’re especially excited about the brussel sprouts this week! These are a challenging vegetable to grow and even under the best circumstances they are not always attractive. Still, the flavor of a farm fresh sprout is worth all the work! You’ll find amazing recipes Brussel Sprouts for everything in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

Let your friends know that they can still get in on the CSA. It’s easy to sign up for a pro-rated Winter Spring CSA Share online!

This week your share may include…

  • Brussel Sprouts: Trim them off the stalk, take a few of the outer leaves off and they’ll be ready for your favorite recipe. I’m a fan or roasting them under the broiler and of this one pot wonder – gnocchi with sprouts & pesto 
  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots – yum!
  • Cauliflower: Big beautiful heads!
  • Celery: The flavor is probably a bit stronger than celery from the store, but it will be great in soup, stuffing or au gratin.
  • Collard Greens: These make a tasty raw salad and also cook down beautifully. If you’re looking for inspiration there are 17 different recipes at CookWithWhatYouHave.
  • Fennel: When the bulbs are sliced raw into salads the fresh anise flavor stands out. The longer the bulbs are cooked, the more subtle the flavor becomes. Try them sautéd with onions and greens or make this Soffrito.
  • Garlic: I usually sauté garlic with onions as the base for any number of culinary adventures. Last week I branched out a bit by making tzatziki with some raw garlic and I also roasted a bunch of whole peeled cloves with carrots & potatoes. Both were a big hit!
  • Onions: Italian cippolini (pronounced chip-oh-lee-knee) are sweet and mild. The baby onions are most common at the store, but we grew some BIG ones this year. They make amazing carmelized onions and are also good cut into chunks and roasted with root veggies.
  • Parsley: This vegetable is both an herb and it is greens. I prefer to treat it more like the latter since it contains all the healthy goodness of other dark leafy greens plus has a distinct flavor and subtle sweetness. You can sauté a pile of chopped parsley in olive oil by itself or in combo with other greens like chard, spinach or kale. Then add them to pasta, scrambled eggs, polenta… yum! Parsley also makes great pesto, chimmichuri and salsa verde. More on my favorite green sauces here.
  • Pie Pumpkins: This time of year I always have to include my grandmothers pumpkin pie recipe, but these cute little pumpkins also make great quick bread or muffins.
  • Potatoes: This Nicola variety has one of the lowest glycemic index of all the potatoes, but you can use it just like you would any other yellow potato – roasted, mashed, boiled, hash browns etc.
  • Winter Squash: Delicata – just cut in half, lay cut side down on a baking sheet coated with a little olive oil and roast in the oven at 350 until tender. It is so sweet it hardly needs toppings and the skin is edible too! Also works well as Squash Rings.

Coming soon… Leeks & Escarole!

 

In Your Share (Oct 30th edition) First Winter Share!

By Laura

Cheddar Cauliflower, photo from Johnny’s Seeds

Welcome to the first Winter CSA of the season! When most people think of fall color they think of leaves turning vibrant red and yellow on deciduous trees around town. That is one of my favorite things about this time of year, but what we have for you this week is just as beautiful, and certainly tastier… Orange Cauliflower!! Orange cauliflower was first discovered as a natural mutant by a gardener near Toronto, Canada in 1970. It was taken to Cornell where Dr. Michael Dickson used traditional breeding techniques to stabilize the orange color and create several named varieties, including my fave, “Cheddar”. Despite the name, there is no cheesy flavor inherent in this cauliflower. However it does contain up to 25% more beta-carotene than white cauliflower. To appreciate the color you may want to serve it raw. The pretty orange florets taste very similar to white cauliflower and can be used in all of the same recipes.

Lots more great winter veggies to come this season so let your friends know that they can still sign up for our Winter Spring CSA Share which is starting THIS WEEK!

Amazing recipes for Orange Cauliflower and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Beets: Try this Beets 101 link for a few simple ways to prepare beets – including my favorite – grated beet and apple salad.
  • Orange Cauliflower: Use in any white cauliflower recipe. Tastes the same but has more healthy beta carotene and looks so cool!
  • Cabbage: This week you’ll see savoy cabbage in your share. Savoyed refers to the  wrinkley crinkly leaves and this type of cabbage is thought to have originated in England & Holland and spread throughout Europe in the 18th century. Savoy cabbage is named for the Savoy region which was ruled by the House of Savoy through the middle ages then annexed by France in 1792 and now is divided between Italy, France and Switzerland. In Germany this cabbage is called Savoyer Kohl, but but I prefer its lovely Italian name, cavolo verza. Whatever you call it, this is a super tasty and versatile vegetable – good raw, roasted, in soups or stews. One of my favorite recipes is this Roasted Cabbage Wedges
  • Daikon Radish: This radish is traditionally this is made into pickles and kimchi but that’s not the only option. It makes a nice addition to slaw – grate it or cut into matchsticks. Or just slice it up and serve with some good butter on bread.
  • Dill: I sprinkle this on salads & roasted veggies & it also makes amazing tzatziki. There are 23 recipes for dill at Cook With What You Have!
  • Garlic: More often than not, dinner at our house starts with some onions & garlic sautéd in olive oil and then we decide what direction to go from there… maybe roast some some peppers and put that over pasta, or cook up a big bunch of greens and put poached eggs on top. So many delicious options!
  • Onions: Mostly white onions this week which are mild with thick rings.
  • Sweet Peppers: These are a mix of Gypsy Queen, Stocky Red Roasters and Gathers Gold with a few Jimmy Nardello’s mixed in. This will be the last of the sweet peppers for the season. I’m always amazed when they make it until November, but we’ve had a beautiful fall this year!
  • Green Peppers: These Anaheim & Poblano peppers are definitely a little spicier and way more interesting than your average green pepper : ) They are traditional in chile rellenos, but there are lots of other ways to use them. Once they are roasted I often make sauce – coarsely chopped or in the food processor. Try this one with pumpkin seeds or make green harissa. 
  • Hot Peppers: Tasty in any dish where you’d like to add a little heat! Hot peppers can also be frozen for future use – take stems off and remove seeds if you want to, then sauté or roast them and freeze in single serving size containers. Nice to be able to add some summer spice to winter soups and stews.
  • Potatoes: Anything you like to do with yellow or red potatoes, you can also do with these beautiful purple potatoes. They are tasty AND good for you since like many other purple “super” foods (ie. blueberries & pomegranates) they contain the antioxidant anthocyanin.
  • Winter Squash: Gill’s Golden Pippin is easy – just cut in half, lay cut side down on a baking sheet coated with a little olive oil and roast in the oven at 350 until tender. It is so sweet it hardly needs toppings : )

Coming soon… The Thanksgiving Share!!

 

In Your Share (Oct 23rd edition)

By Laura

The Delicata squash is one of the best tasting early season winter squash. It has an amazing sweet flavor and creamy flesh that is super tasty from fall harvest through the end of the year. Other winter squash varieties might store longer, but hardly any can beat the eating quality of this one right now! Cut in half lengthwise, scoop out the seeds and bake in the oven until soft. Serve simply with oil, salt & pepper or dress them up with some stuffing. Either way the skin is so tender it can be eaten too.  They are a good source of Vitamin A&C and fiber. Nice to know some sweet treats are healthy too!

Speaking of winter squash – we are signing people up for our Winter Spring CSA Share which is starting NEXT WEEK!

Amazing recipes for Delicata squash and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration! Your access to the website will end soon unless you join us for the Winter Spring CSA season.

This week your share may include…

  • Broccoli: The heads are tasty, but so are the leaves and stem so don’t forget to eat those too!
  • Carrots: Tasty and sweet and yum!
  • Celery: This may be slightly stronger flavored than the celery that you are used to so taste a bit before you put it out with the peanut butter : ) Leaves and stems are perfect for cooking – makes a great addition to stuffing, soups & au gratin potatoes.
  • Garlic: More often than not, dinner at our house starts with some garlic sautéd in olive oil and then we decide what direction to go from there… maybe clam linguini with all that parsley, or cook up a big bunch of greens and put poached eggs on top. So many delicious options!
  • Italian Parsley: This versatile vegetable is both an herb and it is greens. I prefer to treat it more like the latter since it contains all the healthy goodness of other dark leafy greens plus has a distinct flavor and subtle sweetness. I like to sauté a pile of chopped parsley in olive oil by itself or in combo with other greens like chard, spinach or kale. Then add them to pasta, scrambled eggs, polenta… yum! Parsley also makes great pesto, chimmichuri and salsa verde. More on my favorite green sauces here.
  • Hot Peppers: Tasty in any dish where you’d like to add a little heat! Plenty of jalapeños this week so I’m planning to make poppers! A couple of my favorite recipes are Baked Rings and Whole Roasted Jalapeños. Hot peppers can also be frozen for future use – take stems off and remove seeds if you want to, then sauté or roast them and freeze in single serving size containers. Nice to be able to add some summer spice to winter soups and stews.
  • Purple Potatoes: Anything you like to do with yellow or red potatoes, you can also do with these beautiful purple (on the inside too) potatoes. They are tasty AND good for you since like many other purple “super” foods (ie. blueberries & pomegranates) they contain the antioxidant anthocyanin.
  • Pie Pumpkins: You can carve them if you must, but they’d make a really great pie or quick bread and the toasted seeds are tasty too!
  • Winter Squash: As you can see from the way I was waxing poetic above, Delicata is a “gateway” squash. Even those folks who think they don’t like winter squash usually like this one : ) Try this Delicata recipe for Squash Rings.

 

Coming soon… Winter Share!!

 

In Your Share (Oct. 16th edition)

By Laura

I love that the Watermelon Radish, so humble looking on the outside, is shocking pink on the inside! They have a sweet peppery radish flavor, but are usually more mild than a little red radish. They are a good source of Vitamin C and calcium and they are are full of healthy isothiocyanates.  This radish is actually an heirloom daikon, so can be used similarly. The color often fades when cooked so to preserve that gorgeous magenta color, use them raw or pickled.

Speaking of winter root crops – we are signing people up for our Winter CSA Share which is starting SOON!

Amazing recipes for watermelon radish and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Broccoli: The first heads of fall broccoli are often small, but the size will continue to increase over the next few weeks. The heads are tasty, but so are the leaves and stem so don’t forget to eat those too!
  • Collard Greens: Fall greens are beautiful and delicious this time of year.
  • Dill: Tasty with fingerling potato salad or in a yogurt sauce for dipping sweet peppers and radish.
  • Candy Sweet Onions: We had a great crop of sweet onions but they don’t store long so this will likely be the last week of this variety. If you’re joining us for the winter share we’ll have white, cippolini, yellow and red onions in addition to garlic and leeks!
  • Red Cabbage: Makes a great slaw or cook it up with this quick and easy recipe for Roasted Cabbage Wedges. And if you are looking for more inspiration there are almost 3 dozen cabbage recipes at the Cook With What You Have website.
  • Red & Yellow Italian Style Sweet Peppers: Happy to have more Stocky Red Roasters and Gathers Gold. Both of these varieties were developed locally by Frank Morton at Wild Garden Seeds. He de-hybridized some italian peppers, spent a few years selecting the beautiful, tasty and productive progeny and we’re happy to be growing the results.
  • Hot Peppers: Tasty in any dish where you’d like to add a little heat! Plenty of jalapeños this week so I’m planning to make poppers! A couple of my favorite recipes are Baked Rings and Whole Roasted Jalapeños. Hot peppers can also be frozen for future use – take stems off and remove seeds if you want to, then sauté or roast them and freeze in single serving size containers. Nice to be able to add some summer spice to winter soups and stews.
  • Fingerling Potatoes: Not that you probably need a recipe for potatoes, but just reminding you that this Calabrian Recipe with roasted peppers is really good!
  • Watermelon Radish: Try this simple Radish & Apple Salad at the Cook With What You Have website.

Coming soon… Winter Share!!

 

In Your Share (Oct 9th edition)

By Laura

Gill’s Goldn Pippin, photo from Adaptive Seeds

We are starting the winter squash season with one of my favorites – Gill’s Golden Pippin! This little single serving size squash was originally bred right here in Oregon in the mid-20th century by the Gill Brother’s Seed Company. With its pretty orange skin and acorn squash ribbing you might be tempted to use it for decoration, and that’s ok temporarily. But these are so dang delicious that it would be a terrible waste if you didn’t eat them!

Speaking of winter squash – we are signing people up for our Winter CSA Share which is starting SOON!

Amazing recipes for winter squash and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Broccoli: The first heads of fall broccoli are often small, but the size will continue to increase over the next few weeks. The heads are tasty, but so are the leaves and stem so don’t forget to eat those too!
  • Rainbow Chard: Fall greens are beautiful and delicious this time of year.
  • Parsley: This versatile vegetable is both an herb and it is greens. I prefer to treat it more like the latter since it contains all the healthy goodness of other dark leafy greens plus has a distinct flavor and subtle sweetness. I like to sauté a pile of chopped parsley in olive oil by itself or in combo with other greens like chard, spinach or kale. Then add them to pasta, scrambled eggs, polenta… yum! Parsley also makes great pesto, chimmichuri and salsa verde. More on my favorite green sauces here.
  • Candy Sweet Onions: These are nice sautéed with parsley and greens (see above). Or roast them with peppers and potatoes.
  • Red & Yellow Italian Style Sweet Peppers: Finally we have some Stocky Red Roasters and Gathers Gold. Both of these varieties were developed locally by Frank Morton at Wild Garden Seeds. He de-hybridized some italian peppers, spent a few years selecting the beautiful, tasty and productive progeny and we’re happy to be growing the results. These are larger than Jimmy Nardello peppers and have a significantly thicker skin. Great for eating raw or roasted!
  • Anaheim & Poblano Peppers: These are definitely spicier and way more interesting than your average green pepper : ) Try this creative variation on the classic Chile Relleno
  • Hot Peppers: Tasty in any dish where you’d like to add a little heat! Plenty of jalapeños this week so I’m planning to make poppers! A couple of my favorite recipes are Baked Rings and Whole Roasted Jalapeños. Hot peppers can also be frozen for future use – take stems off and remove seeds if you want to then sauté or roast them and freeze in single serving size containers. Nice to be able to add some summer spice to winter soups and stews.
  • Yellow Potatoes: Not that you probably need a recipe for potatoes, but just reminding you that this Calabrian Recipe with roasted peppers is really good!
  • Winter Squash: This Gill’s Golden Pippin is easy – just cut in half, lay cut side down on a baking sheet coated with a little olive oil and roast in the oven at 350 until tender. It is so sweet it hardly needs toppings : )

Coming soon… Purple, Orange and Romanesco Cauliflower

 

In Your Share (Oct 2nd edition)

By Laura

We’re done with tomatoes for the season, but there are some great little tomatillos in the share this week! Also known as Mexican Husk Tomato, these are an interesting cousin to the tomato. A tomatillo fossil found in Argentina last year may be the oldest evidence of that plant family – Solanaceae, or nightshades – so far discovered. At 52 million years old, ancestors to the tomatillo may have been food for the dinosaurs! Thought to have been developed from a wild ancestor by the aztecs, the modern tomatillo (Physalis ixocarpa) is still a staple crop throughout central and south america. And we like to eat it up here too. The flowers are a distinctive yellow with black centers. The fruit can be green, yellow or purple and is always enclosed in a papery wrapper. Usually when fruits are mature they pop through the bottom of the husk. It adds a distinctive and complex flavor to any dish. Check out this recipe from Rick Bayless that uses tomatillos, cilantro, garlic, and hot peppers in your share this week.

Amazing recipes for tomatillos and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Brussel Sprout Tops or Collard Greens: Fall greens are so good this time of year!
  • Cilantro: This is always good in salsa, but also makes a tasty addition to Thai dishes and makes a nice pesto too.
  • Garlic: I’ve been roasting lots of garlic lately with peppers and potatoes and really like them in this Calabrian Recipe at Cook With What You Have.
  • Jimmy Nardello Sweet Peppers: This is definitely one of my favorite peppers – the fruit is beautiful red, thin skinned, early ripening and so sweet!! A traditional Italian frying pepper, this particular variety is named for the grandson of the man  who brought to from Basilicata, Italy to Connecticut in the 1880’s. In addition to great flavor, I love that it is in the Slow Food Ark of Taste and has such a great story. More info about the people and the pepper can be found here.
  • Anaheim & Poblano Peppers: These are way more interesting than your average green pepper : ) Try this creative variation on the classic Chile Relleno
  • Hot Peppers: Tasty in any dish where you’d like to add a little heat! Plenty of jalapeños this week so I’m planning to make poppers! A couple of my favorite recipes are Baked Rings and Whole Roasted Jalapeños.
  • Red Potatoes: Not that you probably need a recipe for red potatoes, but just reminding you that this Calabrian Recipe with roasted peppers is really good!
  • Tomatillos: This would make a great green salsa with the cilantro, garlic, & peppers also in the share this week.

Coming soon… Fall Broccoli & Cauliflower!!