Fresh, local and delicious vegetables since 1996, available now!

Welcome!

Let nature set your table with fresh and delicious produce, locally farmed in tune with the seasons. With our CSA, you pick up a bag or more of bounty every week for less than $3.20 a day for a half share, or $5.75 a day to feed a family of four.

Shares are limited and move as fast as pole beans, so reserve your space today. To learn more and sign up, start with our How the Farm Works page, or go straight to the info/order pages for our two pickup sites, SE Portland and Lake Oswego.

Look forward to seeing you on Facebook and at pick-up!
Getting Oriented

Summer Pick-Up Schedule

47th Ave Farm (SE)
May 20 – October 28
Tuesdays 5-7pm

Luscher Farm
May 22 – October 30
Thursdays 5-7pm

Get signed up today!


Southeast
Pick-Up Notes:

We live on a very narrow gravel road, which can easily become congested during pickup. Please take some alternative form of transportation if possible. If you drive, it’s also extremely helpful if you park at least a block away and walk in.

Please bring your own plastic, paper or earth-friendly bags.

Ask us about our bucket exchange program if you’d like to bring your compost to the farm.

Books we like

ALT

Ripe Information

2014 Summer Shares now available!

A glorious summer season of ripe, delicious veggies is just over the horizon, and we’re excited about all we’ll have to offer our treasured shareholders over the next few months. Will you be one of them? Don’t miss out!

To get signed up, first choose which pickup location suits you best: SE Portland or Lake Oswego’s Luscher Farm, then click the appropriate link below to learn more and/or order.

SE PORTLAND
This pickup is at 6632 SE 47th Ave, Portland OR 97206 on Tuesdays from 5-7pm. Click here to learn more.

LAKE OSWEGO
This pickup is at Luscher Farm, 125 Rosemont Ave, Lake Oswego on Thursdays from 5-7pm. Click here to learn more.

And holy edamame! A summer’s worth of delicious, local produce is yours!

Lights, camera, arugula! A selection of Farm video

A number of great video pieces have been created about the farm over the last year or so. We’ve collected a few of them in one convenient post — click the headline above, pop some (organic) popcorn, and enjoy!

FARM NEWS, NOTES AND (AGRI)CULTURE

In Your Share (June 30th edition)

By Laura

PeasPeasPeasPeasPeas

IMG_0909Big beautiful fava beans are here!! In the midst of this heat wave it’s hard to remember back to those cold sunny days in February when we planted our fava field. We enjoyed the greens earlier this spring, many beneficial insects enjoyed the striking black and white flowers of early summer and finally the tasty young beans have arrived. Favas are in the legume family – a genus which is incredibly diverse. It includes almost 20,ooo species of flowering plants ranging from annuals (ie. sugar snap peas & green beans) to perennial trees. One of the things that plants in this genus have in common is their ability to fix nitrogen. Many of our cover crops are legumes (ie. clover & vetch). Part of the appeal of using legumes in this way is that they actually contribute valuable nitrogen to our cropping system. When we till them in the nitrogen from the root nodules is released and becomes available for our next round of veggies, ideally reducing out dependence on outside sources of fertilizer. Nitrogen fixation also allows plants to meet their metabolic needs even in stressful conditions. Our favas have definitely not had a stressful life – they’ve had plenty of water, sunshine and fertility which means we should have bountiful harvest of beans this season.

Hope you have had a chance to dig into the specially designated CSA site at Cook With What You Have. Katherine has some interesting ideas & recipes for fava beans and the other veggies in your share this week. Just look along the right hand column and click on your favorite veggies to see all the recipes available.  Check your email for the password to access the site. Hope you’re enjoying your 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: Getting a little bit bigger & better every week.
  • Chard: I can’t have chard in the share without passing on my grandmothers chard bisque. Some of my other favorite things to do with chard include: sautéed with raisins & pine nuts, white beans & pancetta, fritattas and the list goes on…
  • Fava Beans:  This recipe, Ignacio Mattos’s Grilled Favas, was a revelation for me. I get to enjoy the  fabulous flavor of favas without double peeling?! It also works well under the broiler too, in case you don’t want to grill. Don’t get me wrong, I always manage to spend a few satisfying summer evenings shelling favas and LOVE them that way too. Just nice to have a relatively quick and very tasty alternative.
  • Garlic: Early Chinese Pink is always the first full size heads to form. They’re not completely dried down and just a bit juicier than the usual head of garlic.
  • Kohlrabi: Just peel the bulbs and use them raw for a sweet & crunchy snack. They’re also tasty grated onto salad.
  • Lettuce: Beautiful heads of red romaine lettuce would make a great caesar salad.
  • Spring Onions: The bulb can be used raw, sautéed or pickled. The tops are nice too & can be used just like a green onion.
  • Parsley: Think tabbouleh and also chimichurri sauce,
  • Sumer Squash: First of the season – cute little courgettes!

Coming soon…  new potatoes are just a few weeks away!!

In Your Share (June 23rd edition)

By Laura

PeasPeasPeasPeasPeas
IMG_0140.JPGThe first sweet summer carrots are here!! We’ve planted several varieties multiple times over the last few weeks so we should have carrots in the share every few weeks for the rest of the season.  Great carrots are the essence of Slow Food fast – hard to imagine a better summer snack : )

Hope you have had a chance to dig into the specially designated CSA site at Cook With What You Have. Katherine has taken all the recipe packets from past years and turned them into a fabulous searchable archive of tips, techniques and ideas. Check your email for the password to access the site. This will provide all of our members with 24 hour access to recipes and inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: First of the summer season!
  • Dill: The greens make a great addition to sauces – think lemony garlic aioli, dill buttermilk salad dressing or tzatziki. Other classic dill combo is  borscht – a great way to use any beets left from last week.
  • Napa Cabbage: This makes a great slaw and is easy to ferment into a classic kimchi. If you liked the Soba Noodle Salad from a few weeks ago, this also works well as a substitute for choi sautéed in that recipe.
  • Cimi di Rapa (aka Sessantina Grossa or Spring Raab): These traditional Italian greens are perfect over pasta or make a lovely fritata.
  • Collard Greens: This is a staple for us during the winter, but several varieties do well in the spring and early sumer as well. Try them with  Southern Style Black Eyed Peas.
  • Lettuce: Beautiful little heads of butter head lettuce!! This is one of my favorite kinds of lettuce – the leaves are soft, silky, tender and mild. Perfect with a little buttermilk dressing, a few carrots and a sprinkle of dill.
  • Spring Onions: The red bulb can be used raw, sautéed or pickled. The tops are nice too & can be used just like a green onion.
  • Turnip: This is peak season for these mild & crunchy Hakuri salad turnips. I usually eat the turnips raw and sauté the greens with a bit of salt & olive oil – simple & tasty!

Coming soon…  fresh lava beans – for sure this time!!

In Your Share (June 16th edition)

By Laura

PeasPeasPeasPeasPeasIMG_0105The evolving summer season… it starts with leaves, followed by roots, then the shoots, eventually flowers and finally fruits. This is how plants grow and your CSA share reflects that essential seasonal progression. This time of year – relatively early in the summer season – we’re growing, harvesting and eating lots of greens, roots & shoots. It’s an opportunity to celebrate salad, herbs and vitamin rich dark leafy cooking greens. It’s when fresh crunchy root crops like radish, hakuri turnip and carrots (coming soon!) are at their peak. Kohlrabi, fennel, onions & garlic are technically not roots, but a swelling of the stem. These are not far behind the true roots and we’re already picking the immature bulbs in the form of green garlic and spring onions. The first flower buds include crops as diverse as garlic scapes and broccoli. The early fruit crops are often legumes – peas, favas & soon green beans. Just another way to understand and appreciate the veggies in your share!

Hope you have had a chance to dig into the specially designated CSA site at Cook With What You Have. Katherine has taken all the recipe packets from past years and turned them into a fabulous searchable archive of tips, techniques and ideas. Check your email for the password to access the site. This will provide all of our members with 24 hour access to recipes and inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Beets: First of the summer season! The little roots can be boiled or steamed then sliced onto salad. Beet greens can be cooked just like chard or spinach. There are more than a dozen great recipes and tips for using beets in the CSA section of  Cook With What You Have.
  • Choi: Big beautiful heads again this week. Have you tried the  Soba Noodle Salad recipe with choi and lots of garlic? Yum!
  • Garlic Scapes: These tender & curly whips are actually immature garlic flower stalks. They can be chopped up, sautéed and used in almost any dish that calls for regular garlic. I like to coat them with a bit of olive oil, lightly salt them and roast a pile on a cookie sheet under the broiler. Let them wilt and start to caramelize then put them on the table and watch them disappear. They have a nice roasted garlic flavor and make fun finger food.
  • Kale: Spring kale is very tender and tasty. It doesn’t need to be cooked for long at all and also makes a great raw kale salad.
  • Mizuna: These frilly greens are mild enough to be added to salad or lightly sautéed. We might also have a few bunches of a red variety called Ruby Streaks in the mix.
  • Spring Onions: Fresh spring onions are here! They have a nice little bulb and the tops can be used just like a green onion.
  • Italian Parsley: I’m a big fan of this Italian parsley – at our house we use tons of it for everything from clam linguini to tabbouleh. Often herbs are used sparingly, but I think of parsley more like the greens and don’t hesitate to add heaps of it when cooking.
  • Sugar Snap Peas: You can eat the whole thing! Both the shell & peas inside are sweet & crunchy – I usually just eat them raw, but they also work well lightly sautéed.
  • Turnip: This is peak season for these mild & crunchy Hakuri salad turnips. I usually eat the turnips raw and sauté the greens with a bit of salt & olive oil – simple & tasty!

Coming soon… butter lettuce & fresh fava beans!!

In Your Share (June 9th edition)

By Laura

PeasPeasPeasPeasPeas
DSCF0327We’re having a bumper crop of Sugar Snap Peas!! We planted them on a nice sunny day way back in January, and now they are over 4′ tall covered with beautiful white blossoms and plump sweet peas – yum!!

Hope you all had a chance to dig into the specially designated CSA site at Cook With What You Have. Katherine has taken all the recipe packets from past years and turned them into a fabulous searchable archive of tips, techniques and ideas. Check your email for the password to access site. This will provide all of our members with 24 hour access to recipes and inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Choi: Big beautiful heads this week. I made this Soba Noodle Salad recipe with choi and lots of garlic  for the crew last week and it was a big hit!
  • Green Garlic: This will be the last week we have these tender little stems. The big garlic bulbs are sizing up in the field, so we’ll start to harvest those in a few weeks. You may see some small orange dots on the garlic – this is rust, a disease that looks terrible on the plants, but is harmless and peels off easily.
  • Garlic Scapes: These tender & curly whips are actually immature garlic flower stalks. They can be chopped up, sautéed and used in almost any dish that calls for regular garlic. I like to coat them with a bit of olive oil, lightly salt them and roast a pile on a cookie sheet under the broiler. Let them wilt and start to caramelize then put them on the table and watch them disappear. They have a nice roasted garlic flavor and make fun finger food.
  • Lettuce Heads: Sweet & tender, red & green heads of lettuce will make a nice spring salad! Varieties this week are Tropicana & Red Baron
  • Mizuna: These frilly greens are mild enough to be added to salad or lightly sautéed.
  • Spring Onions: Fresh spring onions are here! They have a nice little bulb and the tops can be used just like a green onion.
  • Italian Parsley: I’m a big fan of this Italian parsley – at our house we use tons of it for everything from clam linguini to tabbouleh. Often herbs are used sparingly, but I think of parsley more like the greens and don’t hesitate to add heaps of it when cooking.
  • Sugar Snap Peas: You can eat the whole thing! Both the shell & peas inside are sweet & crunchy – I usually just eat them raw, but they also work well lightly sautéed.
  • Radish: These make a great raw snack or try this recipe for radish butter.  The greens are a bit spiky to eat raw, but are tasty when cooked.

Coming soon… fresh fava beans!!

First Summer Share of the Season!! (May 19th edition)

By Laura

DSCF0123We’re very excited about the first summer share!! This has been one of the best spring seasons in recent memory. Sugar snap peas are climbing up their trellis and just starting to flower. Garlic scapes are  poking out of their leaves and beginning to curl. And early tomatoes in the greenhouse are growing like gangbusters. I think it’s going to be a bountiful summer season!

I’m also pleased to announce we have something even better than a recipe packet for you this season! Check your email for the password to access the specially designated CSA site at Cook With What You Have. Katherine has taken all the recipe packets from past years and turned them into a fabulous searchable archive of tips, techniques and ideas. This will provide all of our members with 24 hour access to recipes and inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Arugula: Beautiful bunches of arugula make a great little salad or try them in this recipe with poached eggs.
  • Dry Beans: We have several different varieties for you to to choose from this time – just ask at pickup and we’ll tell you all about them.
  • Cherry Tomatoes: These are best eaten straight off the plant so we’re giving you just that – a nice healthy 4″ cherry tomato plant that you can put in your garden or in a pot on the deck. They are easy to grow – the hardest part will be choosing which kind you want  – Black Cherry, Sungold or Sweetie.
  • Green Garlic: The tender little stems that garlic forms prior to making a head are a treasured spring treat. Like baby leeks, the white tip is the most tender, but everything is edible and adds a nice garlic flavor to whatever you’re cooking.
  • Lettuce Heads: Sweet & tender, red & green heads of lettuce will make a nice spring salad!
  • Mustard Greens: These greens are SPICY when raw but turn mild and flavorful when lightly sautéed.
  • Onions: Copra is the variety and one of our favorite yellow onions
  • Pea and/or Fava Shoots: A lovely fresh addition to salads or add them at the last minute to pasta or eggs. 
  • Potato: Both red and yellow in the mix this week.
  • Turnip: These hakuri japanese salad turnips make a great snack when raw or roasted with a bit of garlic and olive oil.  You can sauté the greens as well.

Coming soon… first the greens, then the roots, then the buds, then the flowers and finally the fruit! 

In Your Share (April 14th edition)

By Laura

DSCF0303 This week is the last Winter Share CSA pickup of the season. Thanks so much for joining us!! This last winter share is in fact the first share for our new crew. We’ve hired 3 more folks to help us out this summer – Heidi, Brindley & Marta.  They’ll join our year round crew – Jennie, Emily, Scott, Allison & Spencer – who planted, weeded and harvested all of your veggies this winter. Looking forward to a great Summer Season!

Another terrific Recipe Packet with ideas for beans & greens, Jimmy Nardello peppers and tips for popcorn!

This week your share may include…

  • Arugula: These bunches of arugula make a great little salad or  try them in this recipe with poached eggs.
  • Dry Beans: Originally selected in the Northeast and especially popular in Maine, the Kenearly Yellow variety is nice for baked beans and hardy winter soups.
  • Kale: Beautiful frilly maroon leaves of Red Ursa kale are lovely!
  • Leeks: This week we have Leige & Luxton leeks in the share.
  • Onions: Mostly Copra yellow onions this week.
  • Dried Sweet (NOT – HOT) Peppers: We experimented with drying a few Jimmy Nardello  peppers since they have a nice sweet flavor. I use them just like a dried tomato – especially good in pasta sauce or a fritatta.
  • Popcorn: Just put the whole ear in a paper bag in the microwave and zap it for 3 minutes and most of the kernels will pop off! DO NOT pop it for much longer than that or the ear will start to burn. The other way to do it is just take the kernels off the ear by hand – then you can use any method of popping you’d like.
  • Potato: I made hash browns last night for dinner with these Yukon Gold potatoes and they were so good!
  • Raab: Hip hip Hooray for raab! We will be picking lots of different variations on this theme for the next few weeks – this time the little heads are from green kale & collards.
  • Radish: A nice little zesty treat! You can sauté the greens as well.
  • Spinach: This is my favorite time of year for spinach – the leaves are large and tender and very tasty.

Coming soon… the last winter share! Have you signed up for summer?

In Your Share (April 1st edition)

By Laura

IMG_0850Can you see the blue heron on the cupola of the Luscher Farm barn? That was the first time I’d ever seen one land on top of the barn! They come often to hunt small prey in the wetland and last week at I saw a record 6 herons at once and a bald eagle too. Today there was a kestrel and several red tail hawks  at the Grand Island farm. We appreciate the birds of prey on the farm as they hunt small rodents for us. The big birds are also just incredibly beautiful and inspiring. The farm provides a good food source for the birds, but often nesting habitat is a limiting factor. Owls and kestrels build their nests in the holes of old snags and dying trees.  That habitat has diminished in the valley over the last few decades. Last year, with some help from the Audubon Society, several owl nest boxes were installed at Luscher Farm. This spring, with some help from the Yamhill Soil & Water Conservation District, we’ll be building kestrel & owl nest boxes at the Grand Island farm.

All kinds of good ideas in your Recipe Packet!

This week your share may include…

  • Dry Beans: The Jacob’s Cattle variety is a beautiful red and white speckled bean. It has a full flavor and long history that has earned it a place in the Slow Food Arc of Taste. Your recipe packet includes some tips for braised and boiled beans that would work well with these.
  • Greens: A nice mix of spring greens including arugula and mizuna. It is tender enough for salad or can be lightly braised.
  • Kale: Beautiful frilly maroon leaves of Red Ursa kale are lovely!
  • Leeks: This week we have Tadorna leeks in the share. We like this one for it’s stocky shape, vigorous growth and disease resistance.
  • Onions: Our old standby, Redwing onions. If you have onions accumulating on your kitchen counter try this recipe for pickled onions in your packet.
  • Dry Hot Peppers: A few dried cayenne  peppers – even just one adds a nice bit of heat to a pot of beans.
  • Potato: Red Potatoes are Sangre which is especially good for boiling or baking.
  • Raab: Hip hip Hooray for raab! We will be picking lots of different variations on this theme for the next few weeks – this time the little heads are from green kale & collards.
  • Winter Squash: Both Butternut and Thelma Sanders.

Coming soon… the last winter share! Have you signed up for summer?

In Your Share (March 17th edition)

By Laura

DSCF0276The onions have come full circle! In order to have onions of some kind in the share almost every month of the year we started seeding last month, planted sets this month, and we’ll do more planting through April and into May. We grow a myriad of different kinds of onions – the sets are for spring onions & onion scapes, the summer onions include sweet varieties like Walla Wallas & Red Tropea, then storage onions like Copra  & the Redwing in your share this week see us through the fall and winter. Hopefully the sunny days will continue so we can get out there in the fields and plant more onions!

A bumper crop of inspiration in the Recipe Packet!

This week your share may include…

  • Dry Beans: The Vermont Cranberry variety is a nice big bean that works for soups or baking. It’s an heirloom from New England that has been around since the 1800′s. We like it because of the rich flavor and ability to ripen in a short cool summer. It was one of the first dry beans we ever grew on the farm – in part due to it’s versatility. It can be picked as a green bean, shelling bean or as a dry bean like we’re using it this year.
  • Collard Greens: This bit of sunny spring weather has inspired the collard greens back to life!
  • Leeks: This week we have both the Flemish heirloom Giant Winter Leige and the vigorous and disease resistant Tadorna.
  • Onions: Our old standby, Redwing onions. If you have onions accumulating on your kitchen counter try this recipe for Onion Marmalade. It called for sweet onions but in fact it works just fine with other varieties.
  • Parsnips: This is probably the last time you’ll see parsnips in the share until next fall. There’s a great recipe for parsnip hash with parsley & lemon in the recipe packet.
  • Potato: Red Potatoes are Sangre which is especially good for boiling or baking.
  • Raab: Hip hip Hooray for raab! We will be picking lots of different variations on this theme for the next few weeks – this week the little heads are surrounded by lots of leaf still and are from the green kale.
  • Shallots: Conservor is a lovely red shallot that is mild enough to use in salad dressings and also makes a great batch of Pok Pok style crispy shallots.
  • Winter Squash: In your share this week is one of my favorites – Butternut.

Coming soon… Popcorn!!