Fresh, local and delicious vegetables since 1996, available now!

Welcome!

Let nature set your table with fresh and delicious produce, locally farmed in tune with the seasons. With our CSA, you pick up a bag or more of bounty every week for less than $3.30 a day for a half share, or $5.90 a day to feed a family of four.

Shares are limited and move as fast as pole beans, so reserve your space today. To learn more and sign up, start with our How the Farm Works page, or go straight to the info/order pages for our two pickup sites, SE Portland and Lake Oswego.

Look forward to seeing you on Facebook and at pick-up!
Getting Oriented

Winter Pick-Up Schedule

47th Ave Farm (SE)
Twice a month on Tuesdays 5-7pm

Nov 3&17
Dec 1&15
Jan 5&19,
Feb 2&16

March 1&15
April 5&19

Luscher Farm
Twice a month on Thursdays 5-7pm

Nov 5&19
Dec 3&17
Jan 7&21,
Feb 4&18

March 3&17
April 7&21

Get signed up today!


 

Southeast
Pick-Up Notes:

We live on a very narrow gravel road, which can easily become congested during pickup. Please take some alternative form of transportation if possible. If you drive, it’s also extremely helpful if you park at least a block away and walk in.

Please bring your own plastic, paper or earth-friendly bags.

Ask us about our bucket exchange program if you’d like to bring your compost to the farm.


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Ripe Information

2015-16 Winter Shares available now!

A delicious winter-spring season of lovely, responsibly farmed veggies is just over the horizon, and we’re excited about all we’ll have to offer our treasured shareholders over the next few months. We’d love for you to be one of them – Sign up for a share today!

To get signed up, first choose which pickup location suits you best: SE Portland or Lake Oswego’s Luscher Farm, then click the appropriate link below to learn more and/or order.

SE PORTLAND
This pickup is at 6632 SE 47th Ave, Portland OR 97206 on every other Tuesday from 5-7pm. Click here to learn more.

LAKE OSWEGO
This pickup is at Luscher Farm, 125 Rosemont Ave, Lake Oswego on every other Thursday from 5-7pm. Click here to learn more.

It’s as easy as filling out a simple form and mailing in a check, then shazam! A winter’s worth of delicious, local produce is yours!

FARM NEWS, NOTES AND (AGRI)CULTURE

In Your Share (Feb 1st edition)

By Laura

IMG_2514The dry beans are here! These Black Coco’s are one of my favorite varieties. Use them in traditional Mexican fare or mix it up with something more elaborate like these Cuban Black Beans. Latin american cultures have cooked black beans for centuries. The beans are high in fiber, potassium, folate and have lots of phytonutrients. While I appreciate the health benefits – I love to eat them because they are so tasty! On a cold day there is nothing better than sitting down with a warm bowl of simple bean soup.

Amazing recipes for everything we grow on the farm are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Beets: There are so many tasty things that can be made with these amazing winter beets! Check out the Farm Crew’s Favorites and try some new ideas & recipes.
  • Dried Black Beans: Traditional robust flavor, good for soup and  burritos or if you’re looking for something different try this salad with sweet potato. Keep an eye on the pot – because they are so fresh they may cook up a bit faster than you’re used to.
  • Coral Escarole or Rainbow Chard: This escarole what I have come to think of as a “gateway” chicory. Just barely bitter, it helps start those who have been resisting radicchio down the path towards more the hard core greens. But perhaps I’m already preaching to the converted! Try this easy Soup with Rice & Greens from Mark Bittman at the NY Times. The beautiful Rainbow Chard will work in this soup as well.
  • Dried Cayenne Peppers: These peppers are hot! Use one whole for a pot of soup or stew. Or a little chopping turns them into red pepper flakes, ready to be sprinkled on anything that needs a little kick added to it.
  • Leeks: I love leeks! So many people think of them as just for special recipes or special occasions. I’m an everyday leek user and I’d like to convert you as well. Anytime you’d use an onion, give leeks a try. Our CSA members can try one of my new favorites… Leek Bruchetta at Cook With What You Have
  • Amish Butter Popcorn: Real popcorn with real flavor! We were first introduced to this variety by Ayers Creek Farm. The seed is now available from Uprising Seed and it is surprisingly versatile – can also be ground into polenta, cornbread or made into masa. Pop it on the cob in the microwave (in a brown paper bag, max 3 min) or take the kernels off the cop and pop it any way you choose.
  • Rutabaga: With all the cold weather these have been really sweet so I’ve find myself eating at least some of them raw as crudités or sliced in salad. CSA members will find more than  a dozen tried & true rutabaga recipes at Cook With What You Have.
  • Winter Squash: Butternut

Coming soon… Beautiful Borlotti Beans!

What are your farmers doing with all those beets?

By Laura

by Katie Swanson

IMG_20160119_154112Let’s be honest – you probably have a pretty healthy stockpile of beets in your fridge at this point.  Even I, a member of the farm crew who loves vegetables very much, get a little overwhelmed when I look in my fridge and see how behind I am in my beet consumption.

We talk about food a lot on the farm and we are constantly sharing recipes and ideas with each other.  So, like always, I came to the farm crew with my beet dilemma. I asked the entire farm crew what their favorite way to eat beets is and I was so pleased with their responses; every answer was so reflective of our true love and enthusiasm we as farmers have for our vegetables.  I thought it might be inspiring to share with you, the CSA members, some beet strategies straight from the farmers.

What is your favorite way to eat or prepare beets?

Jenny (farm manager): “I like to shred them and make an Asian slaw with toasted sesame oil, rice vinegar, salt, soy or tamari or just simple apple cider vinegar…or beet brownies!”

Pete (harvest manager): Pete likes to make beet burgers.  He uses his spiralizer to grind the beets.

Scott (cultivation manager): “I like two ways – Diced roasted on a bruschetta with Parmesan and borscht (a Russian red cabbage and beet soup)…Borscht is my favorite though”

Brady (propagation manager): Brady is famous for her beet chips.  She personally likes beets best when boiled and also loves her roommate’s borscht.

Nitza (irrigation manager): “Two ways – raw shredded salad or steamed and eaten cold with balsamic and maple syrup”.  She then added, “Sauerkraut!”

Bart (direct seeding manager): He likes to make cold beet salad with olive oil, goat cheese, and dill.  He also likes to roast them until they get a little shriveled and crunchy on the outside.

Laura says all her favorite recipes already on the website: http://www.47thavefarm.com/2008/10/beets-101/

Myself: I like beets sautéed in a lime cream sauce.  

These are just a few of our favorite ways to eat beets.  Don’t forget about our custom recipe site, http://www.cookwithwhatyouhave.com/47th-ave-farm-news-tips/ ,which has tons of great recipes using beets.

Happy beet eating!

The Crew

 

In Your Share (Jan 18th edition)

By Laura

IMG_2496“…an historic relic and a culinary treasure.” So says William Woys Weaver in his classic book, 100 Vegetables and Where They Came From. The Zucca Marina di Chioggia (zooka ma-REE-na dee Kee-OH-ja), also known as Chioggia Sea Pumpkin, was developed by the Venetians starting in the 1600’s. Squash were originally brought from the Americas to Europe and it didn’t take long for the Italians to adopt them as their own. Several variations exist including a smooth squash and this famously warty one that we’ve grown. Chioggia, an especially fertile vegetable growing region just southwest of Venice, is also famous for the radicchio and candy striped beet that bear it’s name.

Amazing recipes for everything we grow on the farm are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Beets: All the usual varieties of summer/fall beets are long gone by now. The only one that is still going strong mid-winter is Lutz, also known as Winterkeeper. It’s not the most beautiful beet, but for flavor & winter hardiness, it can’t be beat : )
  • Carrots: So sweet & tender & yum!
  • Coral Escarole: So this is what I have come to think of as a “gateway” chicory. Just barely bitter, it helps start those who have been resisting radicchio down the path towards more the hard core greens. But perhaps I’m already preaching to the converted! Try this easy Soup with Rice & Greens from Mark Bittman at the NY Times.
  • Garlic: This variety has pretty purple wrappers & nice big easy to peel cloves. Goes great with greens.
  • Leeks: I love leeks! So many people think of them as just for special recipes or special occasions. I’m an everyday leek user and I’d like to convert you as well. Anytime you’d use an onion, give leeks a try. Our CSA members can try one of my new favorites… Leek Bruchetta at Cook With What You Have
  • Amish Butter Popcorn: Real popcorn with real flavor! We were first introduced to this variety by Ayers Creek Farm. The seed is now available from Uprising Seed and it is surprisingly versatile – can also be ground into polenta, cornbread or made into masa. Pop it on the cob in the microwave (in a brown paper bag, max 3 min) or take the kernels off the cop and pop it any way you choose.
  • Watermelon Radish: Strikingly beautiful and nutritious these are packed with antioxidants, beta-carotene and vitamins. Originally from China and related to the daikon radish – I tend to use them in salad in order to appreciate their vibrant color. Traditionally they were fermented into kimchee but I also like this quick pickle recipe. If you make it be sure & slice the garlic so the vinegar permeates all the way through the cloves. I’m also excited to try these Watermelon Radish chips – if you beat me to it let me know how they are?
  • Winter Squash: At harvest time in the fall the Marina di Chioggia is a grey-green color. It continues to ripen in storage and the skin turns slowly salmon orange. The fully ripe flesh is a rich dark orange and is famously grilled and sold as street food or turned into filling for ravioli & tortellini. Perhaps less traditional, but still tasty are these variations on a squash theme.

Coming soon… Beautiful Beans!

We’re Hiring!

By Laura

The application deadline for our Farm Manager Position is this Friday, Jan 22nd…

We’re looking for an experienced organic farm manager to lead our talented crew. We have 20 years of experience running a year-round CSA and selling to local award winning restaurants. We are super hard working, committed to continuous improvement and serious about growing great food sustainably & profitably. If you are too, then come join us!

Open Positions include:

In your Share (Jan 11th edition)

By Laura

IMG_6266We’re back! The snow & ice that caused us to reschedule last week had at least one silver lining – it also sweetened up all the veggies for us. A strategy that many plants use in order to avoid damage to their leaves & roots during cold weather is to break large starch molecules in their cells into smaller segments aka sugars. This lowers the freezing point of the tissue AND causes many crops to be quite tasty after a frost. Because of this phenomena, the small but lovely heads of cabbage (and many other things) in your share this week should be especially sweet & crunchy!

Amazing recipes for everything we grow on the farm are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Beets: All the usual varieties of summer/fall beets are long gone by now. The only variety that is still going strong mid-winter is Lutz, also known as Winterkeeper. It’s not the most beautiful beet, but for flavor & winter hardiness, it can’t be beat!
  • Cabbage: This sautéed cabbage recipe is really easy and good.
  • Collard Greens: Many cultures appreciate collard greens. Try this simple & fast Brazilian Collards with Garlic or the slightly more complicated Afro-Vegan Collards with Grits.
  • Garlic: This variety has pretty purple wrappers & nice big easy to peel cloves. Goes great with greens.
  • Leeks: I love leeks! So many people think of them as just for special recipes or special occasions. I’m an everyday leek user and I’d like to convert you as well. Anytime you’d use an onion, give leeks a try.
  • Dried Hot Peppers: These beautiful little Cayenne peppers pack a punch!
  • Rutabaga: I’m enjoying these raw in slaw or roasted or mashed – yum! Find more than a dozen recipes for rutabaga at Cook With What You Have.
  • Turnip: The Purple Tops on these turnips make it easy to distinguish these from their cousins, the rutabaga.
  • Winter Squash: Butternut

Coming soon… Dried Amish Butter Popcorn!

Both CSA Pickups Rescheduled!!

By Laura

Image

 

For only the second time in 20 years the bad winter weather has caused us to reschedule the CSA pickups. Thanks for your understanding and flexibility!

 

 

The CSA members can pickup their veggies…

SE PORTLAND: NEXT TUESDAY
Jan 12th 5-7pm
6632 SE 47th Ave, Portland

LAKE OSWEGO/LUSCHER FARM: NEXT THURSDAY
Jan 14th 5-7pm
125 Rosemont Rd, Lake Oswego

The rest of the winter pickups will continue on our regular schedule. See the sidebar for details.

In Your Share (Dec 1st edition)

By Laura

Beet_ColorHope everyone had a great Thanksgiving! Certainly has been cold since then – Burrr!! The root crops don’t mind – things like beets, turnips and carrots just get sweeter with this chilly weather. Unfortunately, we were not able to harvest as many greens this week because they were frozen. When attached to the plant, many greens can freeze and thaw quite a few times over the course of the winter and recover just fine. Those same greens are wilty and sad if we harvest them while they are frozen. Something about being allowed to warm up while still attached to the plant keeps them happy, but we weren’t able to do that this week. Rest assured, you will have plenty of sweet greens to make up for that over the next several months!

Amazing recipes for everything we grow on the farm are available to members at Cook With What You Have. All the winter CSA members will need to log in to the site again with the new password which you will find in your member email. Then you can enjoy your 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Beets: Big beautiful red beets
  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots!
  • Garlic: This variety has pretty purple wrappers & nice big easy to peel cloves.
  • Leeks: I love leeks! So many people think of them as just for special recipes or special occasions. I’m an everyday leek user and I’d like to convert you as well. Anytime you’d use an onion, give leeks a try.
  • Potatoes: Roasted red potatoes with carrots & turnips – yum!
  • Black Spanish Radish: These winter roots have been used as both food and medicine since the 16th century. They have a distinctive black skin and white flesh. They are mildly spicy when eaten raw and can also be cooked. Try them grated into salads, roasted or look up some speciality recipes at Cook With What You Have
  • Purple Top Turnip: Roasted turnip & carrot is a southern classic or mash them with potatoes.
  • Winter Squash: Beautiful Butternut squash makes a great soup to warm up a winter day.

Coming soon… Berlotti & Black Turtle dried beans

In Your Share (Nov 15th edition)

By Laura

Broccoli_ColorThe stormy weather has arrived! Happily the beautiful broccoli and our rugged root crops are weathering the weather just fine. This week you’ll find some traditional and not-so-traditional Thanksgiving items in your share. Make mashed potatoes with garlic, add celeriac to your stuffing or a root roast, and polish it all off with some pumpkin pie. However you choose to celebrate, you’ll have lots of beautiful veggies!

Amazing recipes for everything we grow on the farm are available to members at Cook With What You Have. All the winter CSA members will need to log in to the site again with the new password which you will find in your member email. Then you can enjoy your 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Broccoli: Yum!
  • Brussel Sprouts: First of the season sprouts are excellent roasted, but perhaps my favorite way to cook them is with gnocchi & pesto.
  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots!
  • Cauliflower: Big beautiful heads
  • Celeriac aka Celery Root: I’m a big fan of this gnarly root. I love the subtle, nutty celery flavor and the versatility. It’s great in stuffing or soup and makes one of my favorite winter salads – celery root remoulade.
  • Cabbage: These beautiful green cabbages are bursting with freshness this time of year. I’m looking forward to winter slaw with grated carrot (or beet, celeriac and/or rutabaga).
  • Garlic: This variety has pretty purple wrappers & nice big easy to peel cloves.
  • Kale: Our favorite red russian variety is this Red Ursa kale. It has pretty ruffled leaves with a beautiful red blush and best of – the leaves are tender & tasty.
  • Leeks: I love leeks! So many people think of them as just for special recipes or special occasions. I’m an everyday leek user and I’d like to convert you as well. Anytime you’d use an onion, give leeks a try.
  • Potatoes: Nicola potatoes have golden skin & golden waxy flesh that makes for great home fries, mashed potatoes and holds up well in soups too. It also has a lower glycemic index that many potatoes.
  • Rutabaga: The lowly underestimated unappreciated rutabaga. We’re going to change that! Members can check out more than a dozen tried & true, tested & tasty recipes at Cook With What You Have. Or keep it simple – mash them with potatoes or roast them with carrots.
  • Winter Squash: Wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without Pumpkin Pie! And a more recent – and very popular – tradition at our house is Delicata squash rings.

Coming soon… Watermelon, Daikon & Black Spanish Radish!