Laura Masterson and Patty at 47th Avenue FarmLet nature set your table with fresh and delicious produce, locally farmed in tune with the seasons. With our CSA – now in its 21st season! – you pick up a bag or more of bounty every week for less than $3.50 a day for a half share, or $6.30 a day to feed a family of four.

Shares are limited and move as fast as pole beans, so reserve your space today. To learn more and sign up, start with our How the Farm Works page, or go straight to the info/order pages for our two pickup sites, SE Portland and Lake Oswego.

Look forward to seeing you on Facebook, on Instagram, and at pick-up!

An amazing summer – our 22nd season! – of delicious, responsibly farmed produce is happening soon – sign up today!

Sign up for occasional news from our farm, advance notices on shares and events, special offers, and more!

Getting Oriented

Winter Pick-Up Schedule

47th Ave Farm (SE)
Tuesdays 5-7pm on the following dates:

October 31
November 14 & 28
December 12
January 9 & 23
February 6 & 20
March 6 & 20
April 3 & 17

Luscher Farm
Thursdays 5-7pm on the following dates:

November 2, 16 & 30
December 14
January 11 & 25
February 8 & 22
March 8 & 22
April 5 & 19


Southeast
Pick-Up Notes:

We live on a very narrow gravel road, which can easily become congested during pickup. Please take some alternative form of transportation if possible. If you drive, it’s also extremely helpful if you park at least a block away and walk in.

Please bring your own plastic, paper or earth-friendly bags. We can re-use clean cardboard egg cartons.

Ask us about our bucket exchange program if you’d like to bring your compost to the farm.


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FARM NEWS, NOTES AND (AGRI)CULTURE

In Your Share (April 16th edition)

Posted by Laura

Hello gorgeous green garlic!! It is such a treat this time of year and doesn’t last long in this truly tender stage. Garlic is planted in the fall, grows roots in the winter, grows shoots in the spring and the fully mature bulbs are harvested just after the 4th of July. While technically edible at any time, we harvest garlic at several distinct stages: green garlic has a straight white shank and tender top, spring garlic has started to form a bulb, but the individual cloves are not separated yet, and fresh & dry storage garlic looks similar to what you see at the store but our varieties are more fresh, flavorful and delish!  All these share the characteristically delightful pungent essence of garlic but each has their distinct charms. You’ll get plenty of green garlic in this last week of winter share. To taste test the other variations on the garlic theme you’ll just have to join us for the upcoming Summer Share Season!!

As you know, we’ve been busy the last few months!! Not only harvesting your winter veggies, but also seeding, transplanting and weeding all of your delicious food for the summer.  All we need now is some LOVE from our members in the form of sign ups : ) The Summer CSA starts mid-May, but early memberships help us get a jump on the season so help us out by signing up TODAY!!

You’ll find recipes for green garlic and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Purple Sprouting Broccoli: Pretty purple heads are tasty and so are the leaves & stems. Roast them whole or chop up and sauté. They also make a fabulous pizza topping!
  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots – yum!
  • Cauliflower: The chef’s we work with have been really enjoying this!! I was inspired by Navarre to roast the little ones whole – greens and all. Check out this photo! Or try this Cauliflower Pasta from Gino’s Restaurant.
  • Collard Greens: These would go really well in the cauliflower & green garlic fritatta in this weeks blogpost from Cook With What You Have.
  • Green Garlic: We plant an early variety, called Early Chinese Pink, in order to have nice plump garlic stalks for you this time of year. The garlic is planted in the fall, grows a vigorous root system through the winter, and pushes up its little green stalks in the spring. We’ll harvest the green garlic for a few months, until the plants start to bulb up and dry down. Similar to leeks – the white part is most tender, but the green tops have good garlic flavor too. Enjoy these little beauties while they last!
  • Leeks: I’m loving the leeks this time of year. Chop and sauté the tender white stem and add them to almost dish that calls for cooked onions. Add the darker tops to soup stock. Or go with a more traditional Potato Leek Soup or make a leek galette.
  • Red Potato: The potatoes are coming full circle! So happy to have these red potatoes for a little bit longer : ) We’ll be planting potatoes for the coming season soon and looking forward to new potatoes early in the Summer Share!
  • Radish Microgreens: These zesty little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Variety Pack of Winter Squash: Tetsu, Oregon Homestead & Sibley maybe a few other kinds too.

Coming soon… Summer Share!

 

A spring Farm Report

Cultivating onions at 47th Ave Farm's Grand Island Farm – photo by Matt GiraudJust the other day, I was out with my draft horses – Dixie and Daisy – cultivating garlic on our Grand Island farm. The sun was in and out, but dry enough that the horses easily stayed on top of the field as my 1920s-era cultivator churned the soil and weeds under my feet. We went back and forth, back and forth, the simple mechanics of the cultivator keeping time, slowly weaving a thread of broken earth into the land.

That simple, uneventful pleasure is definitely not something I’d have been able to enjoy this time last year. As you may remember with the same shiver I do, last winter featured snow that wouldn’t go away, rain (and mud) well into the spring, and a lot of brrrrrrrrrrr!

In fact, we couldn’t even get onto the fields until April last year, setting our planting and harvesting schedules back. Or more accurately, we couldn’t start working the fields responsibly: laying a heavy tractor on muddy fields compacts the soil, squeezing out the oxygen that micro-organisms need to feed the plant and that plants need for a healthy immune system. You can’t have healthy produce without healthy soil, so despite the delays it would cause, we knew we’d want to wait out the mud and do things right. I’m glad we did, but it sure made us long for typical Oregon winters!

Like this year, which by comparison, has been mild and relatively dry. Yes, we had a little snow a last month, and for sure, the low snow pack may come back to haunt Oregon agriculture later, but for now, it makes harvesting easier.

…And we’re already out there planting for summer: Sugar snap peas, fava beans, delicate spring greens like spinach and lettuce. The greenhouse is full of baby plants and the drier weather means we’ll be planting our red tropea onions, spring carrots and early potatoes ahead of schedule! We’re definitely glad to have less mud, and happier plants than we did last year.

Meanwhile, I’ve finished the garlic. The sun pops out and warms my smiling face – and I aim the horses and the cultivator down the edge of the next field. What will this beautiful corner of the planet offer up next?

Let’s find out!

In Your Share (April 2nd, 2018)

Posted by Laura

We’re excited about overwintering cauliflower!! It has been a great season for this challenging crop. We planted last summer, they didn’t freeze over the winter, and this mild spring has made for beautiful little – and soon to be large – heads of creamy white cauliflower goodness : )

Between the cauliflower we also have an incredible stand of interseeded triticale/vetch cover crop. This was part of a super successful cover crop trial done in partnership with OSU and it it providing weed suppression, fertility, and keeping our soil biology healthy & happy through the winter. If you are as excited about cover crop as we are, you are welcome to join us this coming Monday April 9th for a Cover Crop Field Day. See below for more info.

You’ll find recipes for cauliflower and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Purple Sprouting Broccoli: Pretty purple heads are tasty and so are the leaves & stems. Roast them whole or chop up and sauté.
  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots – yum!
  • Cauliflower: The chef’s we work with have been really enjoying this!! I was inspired by Navarre to roast the little ones whole – greens and all. Check out this photo! Or try this Cauliflower Pasta from Gino’s Restaurant.
  • Green Garlic: The first harvest of this season’s garlic planting is up and ready to go! We plant an early variety, called Early Chinese Pink, in order to have nice plump garlic stalks for you this time of year. The garlic is planted in the fall, grows a vigorous root system through the winter, and pushes up its little green stalks in the spring. We’ll harvest the green garlic for a few months, until the plants start to bulb up and dry down. Similar to leeks – the white part is most tender, but the green tops have good garlic flavor too. Enjoy these little beauties while they last!
  • Yellow Onions: Featured at Cook With What You Have this week is the unpronounceable, but super tasty Zwiebelkuchen (aka Onion Tart)
  • Leeks: I’m loving the leeks this time of year. Chop and sauté the tender white stem and add them to almost dish that calls for cooked onions. Add the darker tops to soup stock. Or go with a more traditional Potato Leek Soup or make a leek galette.
  • Radish Microgreens: These zesty little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Variety Pack of Winter Squash: Oregon Homestead & Sibley maybe a few other kinds too.

Coming soon… Summer Share!

 

Cover Crop Field Tour

Posted by Laura

We are really excited that our Grand Island farm is part of this… 

Field Tour Demonstrating a Variety of Interseeded Cover Crop in Conventional and Organic Row Crops

Monday, April, 9, 2018

Please RSVP ed.peachey@oregonstate.edu if you plan to join us lunch

Join us whenever you can at the times listed below…

Route and Schedule

  • 8:30   Koch Farms, 29350 South Cramer Rd, Molalla (45.181536, -122.620056) Common vetch in sweet corn
  • 9:45     Pearmine Farms, 12225 River Rd NE, Gervais (45.096471, -122.977039) Meet at the corner of Concomoly and River Rd. Rye and oats in processing squash
  • 11:15   47th Ave Farms, 18600 SE Lower Island Rd, Grand Island (45.127791, -123.037474) Triticale and common vetch in winter vegetables. Lunch provided here (Please RSVP ed.peachey@oregonstate.edu if you plan to join us lunch)
  • 1:45     Horning Farms, Old River Rd, Corvallis (44.382169, -123.284450) Winter wheat in conventional and direct seeded systems following sweet corn.
  • 2:50     OSU Vegetable Res. Farm, 34346 NE Electric Rd, Corvallis, (44.571485, -123.241370) Small grain cereals and legumes in sweet corn. Effects of interseeding time, planting method, corn variety and herbicides on cover crop establishment.

 

In Your Share (March 19th, 2018 edition)

Posted by Laura

What a treat to have such beautiful spinach!! We grow some specially adapted varieties for this winter & early spring season. This one is called Winter Giant and the leaves truly can grow to be huge. We’ve picked them at a more manageable size for you to enjoy in salads or sautéed. Always tender and tasty – we hope you like it as much as we do!

You’ll find recipes for spinach and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Purple Sprouting Broccoli: Pretty purple heads are tasty and so are the leaves & stems. Roast them whole or chop up and sauté.
  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots – yum!
  • Collard Greens: The workhorse of the winter – enjoy them while they last.
  • Yellow Onions: Most of my meals start with sautéed onions, then a world of possibilities opens up…
  • Yellow Potatoes: This beautiful yellow Nicola is one of our most reliable & tasty potatoes.
  • Black Radish: I did not grow up with this vegetable, but have come to love it! Long considered to have many traditional health benefits, new research is showing this to be true. And nice that it is tasty too : ) My favorite recipes are… mashed with potatoes, grated into slaw, roasted in thin slices/coins. And you’ll find more than a dozen ideas & recipes at Cook With What You Have.
  • Red Shallots: These are lovely in a traditional french vinaigrette and make awesome Crispy Fried Shallots to sprinkle on top of Pho (or anything else for that matter : )
  • Spinach: Beautiful bunches!
  • Variety Pack of Winter Squash: Butternut & Winter Sweet & maybe a few other kinds too.

Coming soon… Summer Share!

 

A boring winter report

Posted by Laura

The horses like to play in the snow but I’m glad that, compared to last year, this has been a boring winter. And if that’s the standard, give me boring every year!

As you may remember with the same shiver I do, last winter featured snow that wouldn’t go away, rain (and mud) well into the spring, and a lot of brrrrrrrrrrr!

In fact, we couldn’t even get onto the fields until April last year, setting our planting and harvesting schedules back. Or more accurately, we couldn’t start working the fields responsibly: laying a heavy tractor on muddy fields compacts the soil, squeezing out the oxygen that micro-organisms need to feed the plant and that plants need for a healthy immune systems. You can’t have healthy produce without healthy soil, so despite the delays it would cause, we knew we’d want to wait out the mud and do things right. I’m glad we did, but it sure made us long for typical Oregon winters!

Like this year, which by comparison, has been mild and relatively dry. Yes, we had a little snow a last month, and for sure, the low snow pack may come back to haunt Oregon agriculture later, but for now, it makes harvesting easier – and we’re already out there planting for summer!

In Your Share (March 5th, 2018 edition)

Posted by Laura

Love these leeks!! They have long tender white shanks and the darker green tops have great flavor too.  I usually chop and sauté the lower half in butter or olive oil as soon as I get them home. Once they are cooked and cooled then often they go straight into the fridge – ready for any number of quick week-day recipes.  The tops need to be cooked longer or just add them to soup stock. You’ll find recipes for leek, and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots – yum!
  • Baby Cabbage: My favorite recipe for these is Roasted Wedges – so easy & so good!
  • Chard: This is definitely not a salad green, but is is one of the most tender cooking greens. If you’re making something that calls for cooked spinach, you can always substitute sautéed chard. It’s really good in frittata, lasagne and my Grandmother’s Bisque.
  • Collard Raab: Like broccolini except better!
  • Leeks: These lovely Liege Giant Winter leeks from Adaptive Seeds are terrific this time of year. When chopped and sautéed they add a sweet rich onion-like flavor to any number of dishes. I substitute them for onions in everything this time of year. Or you can make something special like this Potato Leek Soup.
  • Onions: This easy to make red onion quick pickle will brighten up your winter salads or sandwich.
  • Red Potatoes: One of our most reliable & tasty potatoes – Desiree has pretty red skin, golden flesh and creamy texture, it’s great tasty roasted alone or with other root crops. Would also be perfect in Potato Leek Soup.
  • Radish Microgreens: So happy to have these spicy little gem’s back. Sprinkle a bit of zing on your salad or sandwich.
  • Spinach: Beautiful bunches!
  • Winter Squash, Butternut & Winter sweet: These are easy & sweet!

Coming soon… Overwintering Cauliflower!

 

Winter squash in the spring? Yes!

Posted by Sobin Hiraoka

Most people associate winter squash with, well, winter, so by the time February or March rolls around, it’s as far in the rear view mirror as Halloween and pumpkin pie. Plus, most varieties are huge, great for the big feasts of autumn but not for lighter spring meals.

But still, the warm, comforting flavor of squash and what it can add to recipes year-round doesn’t change, so we began casting around for varieties that tasted great, stored well, and didn’t cast the shadow across the landscape that their larger cousins did.

And I’m happy to say we found some! Tetsukabuto and Winter Sweet are delicious and juuuuuust right in size. We planted them in the summer, harvest them in the fall and then store them for a bit – squashes continue to ripen when stored properly (as we do, of course!) – and now they’re at their peak of flavor and great eating.

By the way, you won’t see either of these varieties in stores – only in your CSA shares! – so enjoy the extra taste of eating something unique and local, in addition to delicious!

(for more, visit the excellent Eat Winter Squash website)