Fresh, local and delicious vegetables since 1996, available now!

Welcome!

Let nature set your table with fresh and delicious produce, locally farmed in tune with the seasons. With our CSA, you pick up a bag or more of bounty every week for less than $3.20 a day for a half share, or $5.75 a day to feed a family of four.

Shares are limited and move as fast as pole beans, so reserve your space today. To learn more and sign up, start with our How the Farm Works page, or go straight to the info/order pages for our two pickup sites, SE Portland and Lake Oswego.

Look forward to seeing you on Facebook and at pick-up!
Getting Oriented

Winter Pick-Up Schedule

47th Ave Farm (SE)
Tuesdays 5-7pm

November 5 & 19
December 3 & 17
January 7 & 21
February 4 & 18
March 4 & 18
April 1 & 15

Luscher Farm
Thursdays 5-7pm

November 7 & 21
December 5 & 19
January 9 & 23
February 6 & 20
March 6 & 20
April 3 & 17


Southeast
Pick-Up Notes:

We live on a very narrow gravel road, which can easily become congested during pickup. Please take some alternative form of transportation if possible. If you drive, it’s also extremely helpful if you park at least a block away and walk in.

Please bring your own plastic, paper or earth-friendly bags. We can re-use clean cardboard egg cartons.

Ask us about our bucket exchange program if you’d like to bring your compost to the farm.

Books we like

ALT

Ripe Information

2014 Summer Shares now available!

A glorious summer season of ripe, delicious veggies is just over the horizon, and we’re excited about all we’ll have to offer our treasured shareholders over the next few months. Will you be one of them? Don’t miss out!

To get signed up, first choose which pickup location suits you best: SE Portland or Lake Oswego’s Luscher Farm, then click the appropriate link below to learn more and/or order.

SE PORTLAND
This pickup is at 6632 SE 47th Ave, Portland OR 97206 on Tuesdays from 5-7pm. Click here to learn more.

LAKE OSWEGO
This pickup is at Luscher Farm, 125 Rosemont Ave, Lake Oswego on Thursdays from 5-7pm. Click here to learn more.

And holy edamame! A summer’s worth of delicious, local produce is yours!

Lights, camera, arugula! A selection of Farm video

A number of great video pieces have been created about the farm over the last year or so. We’ve collected a few of them in one convenient post — click the headline above, pop some (organic) popcorn, and enjoy!

FARM NEWS, NOTES AND (AGRI)CULTURE

In Your Share (April 14th edition)

By Laura

DSCF0303 This week is the last Winter Share CSA pickup of the season. Thanks so much for joining us!! This last winter share is in fact the first share for our new crew. We’ve hired 3 more folks to help us out this summer – Heidi, Brindley & Marta.  They’ll join our year round crew – Jennie, Emily, Scott, Allison & Spencer – who planted, weeded and harvested all of your veggies this winter. Looking forward to a great Summer Season!

Another terrific Recipe Packet with ideas for beans & greens, Jimmy Nardello peppers and tips for popcorn!

This week your share may include…

  • Arugula: These bunches of arugula make a great little salad or  try them in this recipe with poached eggs.
  • Dry Beans: Originally selected in the Northeast and especially popular in Maine, the Kenearly Yellow variety is nice for baked beans and hardy winter soups.
  • Kale: Beautiful frilly maroon leaves of Red Ursa kale are lovely!
  • Leeks: This week we have Leige & Luxton leeks in the share.
  • Onions: Mostly Copra yellow onions this week.
  • Dried Sweet (NOT – HOT) Peppers: We experimented with drying a few Jimmy Nardello  peppers since they have a nice sweet flavor. I use them just like a dried tomato – especially good in pasta sauce or a fritatta.
  • Popcorn: Just put the whole ear in a paper bag in the microwave and zap it for 3 minutes and most of the kernels will pop off! DO NOT pop it for much longer than that or the ear will start to burn. The other way to do it is just take the kernels off the ear by hand – then you can use any method of popping you’d like.
  • Potato: I made hash browns last night for dinner with these Yukon Gold potatoes and they were so good!
  • Raab: Hip hip Hooray for raab! We will be picking lots of different variations on this theme for the next few weeks – this time the little heads are from green kale & collards.
  • Radish: A nice little zesty treat! You can sauté the greens as well.
  • Spinach: This is my favorite time of year for spinach – the leaves are large and tender and very tasty.

Coming soon… the last winter share! Have you signed up for summer?

In Your Share (April 1st edition)

By Laura

IMG_0850Can you see the blue heron on the cupola of the Luscher Farm barn? That was the first time I’d ever seen one land on top of the barn! They come often to hunt small prey in the wetland and last week at I saw a record 6 herons at once and a bald eagle too. Today there was a kestrel and several red tail hawks  at the Grand Island farm. We appreciate the birds of prey on the farm as they hunt small rodents for us. The big birds are also just incredibly beautiful and inspiring. The farm provides a good food source for the birds, but often nesting habitat is a limiting factor. Owls and kestrels build their nests in the holes of old snags and dying trees.  That habitat has diminished in the valley over the last few decades. Last year, with some help from the Audubon Society, several owl nest boxes were installed at Luscher Farm. This spring, with some help from the Yamhill Soil & Water Conservation District, we’ll be building kestrel & owl nest boxes at the Grand Island farm.

All kinds of good ideas in your Recipe Packet!

This week your share may include…

  • Dry Beans: The Jacob’s Cattle variety is a beautiful red and white speckled bean. It has a full flavor and long history that has earned it a place in the Slow Food Arc of Taste. Your recipe packet includes some tips for braised and boiled beans that would work well with these.
  • Greens: A nice mix of spring greens including arugula and mizuna. It is tender enough for salad or can be lightly braised.
  • Kale: Beautiful frilly maroon leaves of Red Ursa kale are lovely!
  • Leeks: This week we have Tadorna leeks in the share. We like this one for it’s stocky shape, vigorous growth and disease resistance.
  • Onions: Our old standby, Redwing onions. If you have onions accumulating on your kitchen counter try this recipe for pickled onions in your packet.
  • Dry Hot Peppers: A few dried cayenne  peppers – even just one adds a nice bit of heat to a pot of beans.
  • Potato: Red Potatoes are Sangre which is especially good for boiling or baking.
  • Raab: Hip hip Hooray for raab! We will be picking lots of different variations on this theme for the next few weeks – this time the little heads are from green kale & collards.
  • Winter Squash: Both Butternut and Thelma Sanders.

Coming soon… the last winter share! Have you signed up for summer?

In Your Share (March 17th edition)

By Laura

DSCF0276The onions have come full circle! In order to have onions of some kind in the share almost every month of the year we started seeding last month, planted sets this month, and we’ll do more planting through April and into May. We grow a myriad of different kinds of onions – the sets are for spring onions & onion scapes, the summer onions include sweet varieties like Walla Wallas & Red Tropea, then storage onions like Copra  & the Redwing in your share this week see us through the fall and winter. Hopefully the sunny days will continue so we can get out there in the fields and plant more onions!

A bumper crop of inspiration in the Recipe Packet!

This week your share may include…

  • Dry Beans: The Vermont Cranberry variety is a nice big bean that works for soups or baking. It’s an heirloom from New England that has been around since the 1800′s. We like it because of the rich flavor and ability to ripen in a short cool summer. It was one of the first dry beans we ever grew on the farm – in part due to it’s versatility. It can be picked as a green bean, shelling bean or as a dry bean like we’re using it this year.
  • Collard Greens: This bit of sunny spring weather has inspired the collard greens back to life!
  • Leeks: This week we have both the Flemish heirloom Giant Winter Leige and the vigorous and disease resistant Tadorna.
  • Onions: Our old standby, Redwing onions. If you have onions accumulating on your kitchen counter try this recipe for Onion Marmalade. It called for sweet onions but in fact it works just fine with other varieties.
  • Parsnips: This is probably the last time you’ll see parsnips in the share until next fall. There’s a great recipe for parsnip hash with parsley & lemon in the recipe packet.
  • Potato: Red Potatoes are Sangre which is especially good for boiling or baking.
  • Raab: Hip hip Hooray for raab! We will be picking lots of different variations on this theme for the next few weeks – this week the little heads are surrounded by lots of leaf still and are from the green kale.
  • Shallots: Conservor is a lovely red shallot that is mild enough to use in salad dressings and also makes a great batch of Pok Pok style crispy shallots.
  • Winter Squash: In your share this week is one of my favorites – Butternut.

Coming soon… Popcorn!! 

In Your Share (March 3rd edition)

By Laura

DSCF0259The leeks are such a blessing this time of year! They survive freezing temps, the snowpocalypse, and just keep on growing. Our tried and true varieties are King Richard and Blue Solaise. The King Richard is a very elegant long thin leek with beautiful white shanks. In cold winters it can look a bit worse for wear so we usually harvest it earlier in the season. Blue Solaise, on the other hand, can handle much harsher winters than we (hopefully) ever have here. It is a short & sturdy leek with leaves that turn a beautiful purplish-blue after the first frosts – hence the name. We’ve also been trying out a few new kinds of leeks and two of these varieties – heirloom Giant Musselburgh and hybrid Lexton – are in your share. Let us know what you think?

Lots of great ideas for using your leeks (and of course other veggies) in the Recipe Packet!

This week your share may include…

  • Dry Beans: You’ll have your choice of either Black Coco or King of the Early this week. They’re both tasty and versatile beans and there are recipes in this packet as well as past packets if you’re in need of inspiration.
  • Brussel Sprouts: The last of our tasty little winter brussel sprouts. Try the Momofuku inspired recipe below from shareholder Elizabeth Hammer – yum!
  • Dried Cayenne Peppers: These definitely have some heat to them. Add whole ones to a pot of beans or chop them up for homemade red pepper flakes.
  • Collard Greens: This bit of sunny spring weather has inspired the collard greens back to life!
  • Leeks: This week we have both the Scottish heirloom Giant Musselburgh & hardy hybrid Lexton.
  • Onions: Our old standby, yellow Copra onions.
  • Potato: Yellow potatoes will be either Carola or Charlotte. Carola is a very popular creamy potato that can be served almost any way you’d like. Charlotte is generally smaller and is a classic european favorite for salad.
  • Shallots: Conservor is a lovely red shallot that is mild enough to use in salad dressings and also makes a great batch of Pok Pok style crispy shallots.
  • Winter Squash: In your share this week is the Thelma Sanders Sweet Potato Squash. How could we possibly go wrong with a name like that! It’s a nice medium size squash that has the sweet flavor of it’s cousins – delicate & acorn – but unlike them it lasts a lot longer in storage without looking that good flavor. We had an interesting meeting with OSU last week about the work their small farms team is doing on winter squash varieties. This coming season we’ll be trying some new techniques and varieties based on their research and  info from other farmers in the area. 

Coming soon… Fingers crossed for Raab, Rapini, & Broccolini!!

 

2014 Summer Shares now available!

By Laura

A glorious summer season of ripe, delicious veggies is just over the horizon, and we’re excited about all we’ll have to offer our treasured shareholders over the next few months. Will you be one of them? Don’t miss out!

To get signed up, first choose which pickup location suits you best: SE Portland or Lake Oswego’s Luscher Farm, then click the appropriate link below to learn more and/or order.

SE PORTLAND
This pickup is at 6632 SE 47th Ave, Portland OR 97206 on Tuesdays from 5-7pm. Click here to learn more.

LAKE OSWEGO
This pickup is at Luscher Farm, 125 Rosemont Ave, Lake Oswego on Thursdays from 5-7pm. Click here to learn more.

And holy edamame! A summer’s worth of delicious, local produce is yours!

Momofuku’s Roasted Brussel Sprouts

By Laura

Momofuku’s Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Fish Sauce Vinaigrette
Adapted from David Chang

2 tablespoons very thinly sliced cilantro stems, plus 1/2 cup leaves
3 tablespoons chopped mint
2 pounds brussels sprouts (smaller ones are better)
Grapeseed or other neutral oil as needed, as needed (lots for frying, little for roasting)
1/2 cup fish sauce (adjust to taste — some fish sauce brands are saltier)
1/4 cup water
2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
Juice of 1 lime
1/4 cup sugar
1 garlic clove, minced
1 to 3 red cayenne peppers, rehydrated & thinly sliced, seeds intact

Combine the vinaigrette (below), cilantro stems, and mint in a bowl, and set aside.

Peel away any loose or discolored outer leaves, trim the dry end of the stems with a knife, and cut the sprouts in half. Cut any especially large ones in quarters. Do not wash, especially if frying the sprouts. If roasting, and you must, dry very well.

Options for cooking sprouts:

  • To roast the brussels sprouts: Heat the oven to 400 degrees F. Heat 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil (or just enough to evenly coat the bottom of the pan) in 2 oven-safe wide skillets (12 to 14 inches) over medium heat. When the oil slides easily from side to side of the pan, add the brussels sprouts cut side down. When the cut faces of the sprouts begin to brown, transfer the pan to the oven to finish cooking, about 15 minutes. Alternately, if you don’t have 2 large skillets or are cooking more sprouts for a larger crowd, roast them in the oven: toss them with 1 tablespoon of oil per pound and spread them on a baking sheet, cut sides down. Roast in the oven, checking for browning every 10-15 minutes, tossing them around with a spatula only once they start to brown nicely.The sprouts are ready when they are tender but not soft, with nice, dark brown color.
  • To fry the brussels sprouts: Heat 11/2 inches of oil in a deep saucepan over medium-high heat until a deep-fry or instant-read thermometer registers 375°F. Line a plate with paper towels. Fry in batches that don’t crowd the pan — be careful, these will pop and spatter. Brussels sprouts will take about 5 minutes: when the outer leaves begin to hint at going black around the edges—i.e., after the sprouts have sizzled, shrunk, popped, and browned but before they burn—remove them to a paper towel–lined plate or tray.

Serve warm or at room temperature. When ready to serve, divide the brussels sprouts among four bowls (or serve it all out of one big bowl), top with the dressing (below) to taste and cilantro leaves, and toss once or twice to coat.

Dressing: Combine the fish sauce, water, vinegar, lime juice, sugar, garlic, and chiles in a jar. Taste; If too salty, add more water and/or lime juice. This vinaigrette will keep for up to a week in the refrigerator.

In Your Share (Feb 17th edition)

By Laura

IMG_0724We grew more dry beans this year than ever before! This is a photo from a few weeks ago with a little more than half the crop in the trailer. At this point the beans were still in their pods and we’re heading out to shell, winnow & clean them. In your share this week you’ll see a black turtle bean variety called Black Coco. It swells larger than most beans when cooked and combines well with cayenne peppers, roasted roots and any of the alliums ie. onions, shallots, leeks, & garlic.

At the farm this week we’ve been reading applications for our new crew members and we’re excited to have some very strong candidates! We’ll interview over the next few weeks and have folks start in April so you’ll get to meet them at the final winter share pickup.

Lots of great ideas in the Recipe Packet this week!

This week your share may include…

  • Black Coco Dry Beans: I like that these are larger than many black bean varieties. They cook up evenly into large creamy beans that are great in tacos, burritos, & heuvos rancheros.
  • Brussel Sprouts: This variety, Genius, is neither the biggest nor the most beautiful sprout we grow. A more apt name might be Survivor, since it was one of the few to make it through all the trials and tribulations of this crazy winter. It will require some peeling, but those who persevere will be rewarded with  tasty little sprouts!
  • Carrots: We’ve been able to harvest a few more carrots but this will be the last of them for the winter season.
  • Dried Cayenne Peppers: These definitely have some heat to them. Add whole ones to a pot of beans or chop them up for homemade red pepper flakes.
  • Onions: Our old standby, Copra.
  • Parsnips: These are related to carrots but definitely NOT meant to be eaten raw! Try them roasted with the carrots or mashed with potatoes.
  • Potato: Both Red & Purple varieties this week.
  • Winter Squash: I’m looking forward to trying the black beans and butternut squash in the recipe packet!

Coming soon… Fingers crossed for Raab, Rapini, & Broccolini!!

 

Small Farms Conference in Corvallis

By Laura

We’re excited to be headed down to the Small Farms Conference with the whole crew on Saturday Feb 22nd!! Michael Ableman – a well known farmer, writer and photographer – will be a great keynote speaker. And the rest of the schedule is full of interesting workshops on everything from marketing to tools to soil health. There may still be a few spots left if you want check and sign up here. I’m looking forward to learning lots and seeing many friends and farmers!!