Laura Masterson and Patty at 47th Avenue FarmLet nature set your table with fresh and delicious produce, locally farmed in tune with the seasons. With our CSA – now in its 20th season! – you pick up a bag or more of bounty every week for less than $3.30 a day for a half share, or $5.95 a day to feed a family of four.

Shares are limited and move as fast as pole beans, so reserve your space today. To learn more and sign up, start with our How the Farm Works page, or go straight to the info/order pages for our two pickup sites, SE Portland and Lake Oswego.

Look forward to seeing you on Facebook, on Instagram, and at pick-up!

A delicious winter season – our 20th year! – of lovely, responsibly farmed veggies is just around the bend starting November 1st!

Sign up for occasional news from our farm, advance notices on shares and events, special offers, and more!

Getting Oriented

Winter Pick-Up Schedule

47th Ave Farm (SE)
Tuesdays 5-7pm

November 1, 15 & 29
December 13
January 3, 17 & 31
February 14 & 28
March 14 & 28
April 11

Luscher Farm
Thursdays 5-7pm

November 3 & 17
December 1 & 15
January 5 & 19
February 2 & 16
March 2, 16 & 30
April 13


Southeast
Pick-Up Notes:

We live on a very narrow gravel road, which can easily become congested during pickup. Please take some alternative form of transportation if possible. If you drive, it’s also extremely helpful if you park at least a block away and walk in.

Please bring your own plastic, paper or earth-friendly bags. We can re-use clean cardboard egg cartons.

Ask us about our bucket exchange program if you’d like to bring your compost to the farm.


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FARM NEWS, NOTES AND (AGRI)CULTURE

In Your Share (Nov 28th edition)

Posted by Laura

Version 2This week in your share you’ll find one of my favorite little squash! Gill’s Golden Pippin is a super tasty single serving size acorn type squash with a great local story. It was developed in the mid-twentieth century by the Gill Brothers Seed Co in Portland and featured prominently in their catalogs in the 1960’s. Not sure why it fell out of favor, but happily interest in this amazing little variety has revived – thanks in part to our friends at Adaptive Seeds who, in addition to producing seed have been singing it’s praises in their catalog. So glad they convinced us to start growing it again!

Amazing recipes for winter squash and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Brussel Sprout Tops: Use these like you would a tender baby collard bunch.
  • Red Cabbage: Makes a festive holiday slaw.
  • Celery: This may be slightly stronger flavored than the celery that you are used to so taste a bit before you put it out with the peanut butter : ) Leaves and stems are perfect for cooking – makes a great addition to stuffing, soups & au gratin potatoes.
  • Celery Root (Celeriac): Peel the outer layer off and use the tender center for celery root remoulade or roast them with other root veggies or sauté and add to soup.
  • Collard Greens: These are traditionally cooked for a LONG time with a ham hock and they are quite tasty that way! This time of year they are also tender enough for salad if you cut them into a fine chiffonade.
  • Fennel: Last bulbs of the season.
  • Garlic: Nice little heads this week from a variety we call Persephone because we got the original seed years ago from Persephone Farm in Lebanon, OR. Jeff & Elanor run the farm and have been good friends and generous farming mentors to us over the years. When we bought the seed from them, they weren’t sure what type of garlic this was so we decided to just name the mystery variety after them : )
  • Kohlrabi: Make sure and peel the outer layer of skin off then enjoy the sweet crunchy center. I  usually eat these raw with dip or grated into salad but they also work well roasted with potatoes & garlic.
  • Leeks: Love the winter leeks! Use the tender white part like an onion and the greens make amazing soup stock.
  • Red Potatoes: I’m roasting red potatoes with… garlic, fennel, celeriac and maybe even some kohlrabi.
  • Gill’s Golden Pippin Squash: Adorable single serving size acorn type with a sweet nutty flavor.

Coming soon… Sweet Winter Carrots!

In Your Share (Nov 14th edition)

Posted by Laura

pumpkin_colorI’m excited about pumpkin pie! And all the rest of the fabulous foods that make Thanksgiving one of my favorite holidays. In Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer, she devotes a whole chapter to The Honorable Harvest. Her stories are mostly about collecting wild foods but the ethical code she describes hold true for farming (and other endeavors) as well. When she was growing up… “the guidelines for the Honorable Harvest are not written down, or even spoken of consistently as a whole – they are reinforced in all acts of daily life.” Even though there is no list, based on all her experience she begins to write some of the tenants down. The ones that rang true for me include:

Know the ways of the ones who take care of you, so that you may take care of them.
This makes me think of the earthworms, and what we need to know about their life cycle in order to take care of them so they can continue to help us. Less tillage = happier worms.

Harvest in a way that mimimizes harm.
This affirms our commitment not to drive out into our muddy fields to harvest this time of year because of the damage that would do to our soil. It’s definitely harder for the people, but better for the planet.

Use it respectfully. Never waste what you have taken.
This is the reason I was up too late last night making applesauce before the fruit my neighbor gave me went bad. And when all else fails we make compost so it goes back to feed the soil.

Share.
It is the reason I love the CSA model – for the shared commitment we make to each other and for the ongoing conversations we share which continue to inspire us together to make honorable choices about food & farming & life.

Give thanks for what you have been given. Give a gift, in reciprocity for what you have taken.
I am thankful for good food & friends & family. And I’m bringing gifts of food (of course!) and compassion. Hope you also have lots to give thanks for during this holiday season!

Amazing recipes for everything in your Thanksgiving share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Brussel Sprouts: One of my favorite things to do is mix the sprouts with a little salt & olive oil and roast them under the broiler. Make sure and stir several times and turn the pan around so they all cook evenly. Doing it this way they are nicely carmelized on the outside but never overcooked. I also love Gnocchi & Sprouts with Pesto.
  • Red Cabbage: Makes a festive holiday slaw.
  • Carrots: Yum!
  • Celery: This may be slightly stronger flavored than the celery that you are used to so taste a bit before you put it out with the peanut butter : ) Leaves and stems are perfect for cooking – makes a great addition to stuffing, soups & au gratin potatoes.
  • Garlic: The garlic we harvested this summer has been drying in the barn for the last 4 months. We finally had a few rainy days to get it cleaned up and sorted. The bounty is clear – many big beautiful heads of Chesnok & Music.
  • Tuscan Kale: Love these dark green skinny savoyed leaves of the kale with many names… Dinosaur, Black, Toscano. It is tasty no matter what you call it! Holds up well in cooked dishes and also makes a great raw kale salad.
  • Parsley: Flat leaf Italian parsley 
  • Yellow Nicola Potatoes: Golden skin & golden flesh – these are great for roasting and mashing. Also, if you are eating fewer carbs this is a good potato as it rates lower on the glycemic index than most.
  • Delicata Squash & Pie Pumpkins: Delicata are among the sweetest of all winter squash and are often compared in flavor to a sweet potato. Cut them in half length wise, remove seeds, and bake, cut side down in the oven until the top is soft and the bottom is starting to caramelize. Or cut them the other direction and make Squash Rings. If pumpkin pie NOT from a can is on your holiday menu you should definitely try my Grandmothers recipe. These pumpkins also make great squash soup and pumpkin muffins.
  • Shallots: I’m a big fan of shallots – they have such a nice delicate flavor. They usually store for months, but ours had a stressed out start because they got the wrong potting soil and never quite recovered. We’re giving out lots in the share so you’ll have plenty and if you find a bad spot just cut out around it and use the rest.

Coming soon… Lovely Leeks!

Winter share starts tomorrow!

Posted by Laura

47th Avenue Farm winter CSA share

We’ve been dreaming about sweet winter carrots, purple sprouting broccoli, heirloom winter squash, and a whole lot more, so we couldn’t be more excited our tasty winter/spring share is starting this week!

In fact, the first pickup for SE is tomorrow, Tuesday, November 1st! If you haven’t signed up yet, there’s still time because it’s super easy: just fill out the form below and bring a check to tomorrow’s pickup:



SE PORTLAND SIGN UP FORM:

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… and 24 weeks (across 12 pickups) of delicious winter and spring produce will be yours!

And by the way, if you live in the Lake Oswego area and would prefer to pick up at the historic Luscher Farm, that’s easy, too: learn more here or just sign up here and join us for pickup on Thursday.

Last Summer Share (Oct 24th edition)

Posted by Laura

delicatasquash1-1000pxThanks so much to all our summer members for joining us!! We have a festive final share for you filled with fun fall treats including Delicata squash, carrots, and purple potatoes.

Amazing recipes for Delicata Squash and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: We’ve grown this Hercules variety for a few years and find it quite sturdy & sweet. Hope you enjoy it!
  • Cauliflower: Put the florettes under the broiler, cut in rounds & make cauliflower “steak” on the grill, make soup, or pickles, or – one of my personal favorites – try a cauliflower curry pizza! It sounds a bit unusual, but it is always a big hit!  I sauté a red onion in olive oil then add cauliflower and curry powder. Next, lay out the pizza dough, brush it with olive oil, add the cauliflower topping, put some mozzarella on top and bake. Simple and tasty!
  • Garlic: The garlic we harvested this summer has been drying in the barn for the last 4 months. We finally had a few rainy days to get it cleaned up and sorted. The bounty is clear – many big beautiful heads of Chesnok & Music. There’s going to be lots of good garlic in the winter share!
  • Kale: Big lovely leaves of Red Ursa Kale.
  • Onions: Several kinds in the share this week from Candy to Red Tropea.
  • Parsley: Flat leaf Italian parsley 
  • Mixed Anaheim & Poblano Peppers: The last of the season.
  • Purple Potatoes: Purple on the outside and on the inside too! This variety, Purple Majesty, is high in anthocyanin, an antioxidant, and makes great fries. Eat it soon as it only lasts for a little while in storage.
  • Delicata Squash: These are among the sweetest of all winter squash and are often compared in flavor to a sweet potato. Cut them in half length wise, remove seeds, and bake, cut side down in the oven until the top is soft and the bottom is starting to caramelize. Or cut them the other direction and make Squash Rings.

Coming soon… Winter CSA!

In Your Share (Oct 17th edition)

Posted by Laura

broccoli_colorFall crops are here – beautiful broccoli, cauliflower and romanesco! As many folks know these are all in the brassica family and are famous for their health benefits. As if not more important – this time of year these crops taste amazing!! For Slow Food Fast – just cut up the heads into bite size pieces, toss with nothing more than salt and olive oil and put it under the broiler. They are ready as soon as the edges start to caramelize – yum!

Happy to report that we got all the storage crops in and cover crops planted before the rains began! That said, there’s always plenty to do at the farm. This week we are finishing up the garlic planting and starting to drain irrigation pipes so we can winterize the system. In the winter it is too wet to drive out into the fields so everything take a little longer. That said, it’s a nice change of pace from the hectic craziness of summer.

The big storm that was forecast weekend never really happened, but we did have some high winds and a bit of hail. Winter is on it’s way! And if you want to keep getting great produce then we hope you’ll join our WINTER CSA!!  Summer share runs through the end of October. Winter share starts the first week in November and runs through April. Hope you can join us!

Amazing recipes for broccoli, cauliflower, romanesco and everything else we grow on the farm are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Broccoli: It doesn’t need much introduction – yum!
  • Cauliflower: Put the florettes under the broiler, cut in rounds & make cauliflower “steak” on the grill, make soup or – one of my personal favorites – try a cauliflower curry pizza! It sounds a bit unusual, but it is always a big hit!  I sauté a red onion in olive oil then add cauliflower and curry powder. Next, lay out the pizza dough, brush it with olive oil, add the cauliflower topping, put some mozzarella on top and bake. Simple and tasty!
  • Lettuce Heads: We were happy that these made it through the hail storm!
  • Red Tropea Onions: An Italian heirloom from the coast south of Venice, these have a distinctive elongated shape and slightly sweet flavor.
  • Mixed Sweet Peppers: Probably the last of the season – choose from Jimmy Nardello, Gatherers Gold, & Stocky Red Roaster.
  • Hot Peppers: A few jalapeño, black czech and bulgarian carrot to liven up your winter soups & stews!
  • Romanesco: Possibly the most weirdly beautiful vegetable in the world aka the fractal cauliflower. Use the florets raw or cooked just like you would a regular cauliflower.
  • Hakuri Turnip: No greens this week – the hailstorm did them in, but the roots are incredibly sweet & crunchy!

Coming soon… Winter CSA!

In Your Share (Aug 15th edition)

Posted by Laura

SummerSquash1_ColorTime for summer squash! It comes in all shapes and sizes – one of my favorites is this Flying Saucer patty pan. We’re also growing yellow & green zucchini, yellow crookneck & italian costata romanesco so there will be lots to chose from in the share. Fresh summer squash has a sweet nutty flavor that shines on the grill or lightly sautéed.

It is going to be hot again this week so we’ll be harvesting early in the morning and doing lots of irrigation. Most of the farm is on drop irrigation but as we finish up the last of the summer transplanting we’ll put overhead sprinklers on that to keep it cool.

Amazing recipes for summer squash & fresh beans and everything else we grow on the farm are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Fresh Beans: Eat them raw or lightly cooked – any way you slice them these green, yellow & purple beans are tender & tasty!
  • Cabbage: Time to break out your favorite summer coleslaw recipe!
  • Cucumbers: We have have some regular green slicers and we’re also growing a new variety called Silver Slicer. It is related to one of our favorite heirlooms, Boothby’s Blonde, and it has the same great heirloom flavor just with larger fruit!
  • Sweet Corn: for dinner tonight! 
  • Garlic: Nice big heads of Early Chinese Pink.
  • Parsley: Try using it like you would spinach or chard – chop up a heaping pile and sauté and add to pasta, polenta, frittata, etc. Or make hummus with the fava beans and add a big handful of parsley to that. I also pick whole leaves off the bunch and add them to my green salad. And you can try one of these three tasty Tabbouleh recipes recommendations… Yotam Ottolenghi from his cookbook Jerusalem which includes pomegranates and a traditional spice mixture. From David Lebovitz on his blog Living the Sweet Life in Paris – he is very particular and this recipe is very good. And last but not least – the simplest version which is also really good – from Ina Garten at her Barefoot Contessa series.
  • Lettuce: Wow – this green summer crisp variety called Concept got BIG! All the heads are sweet and crunchy – enjoy lots of summer salad this week!
  • Summer Squash: Several of different kinds to chose from.

Coming soon… Zesty Summer Radish!

In Your Share (Aug 8th edition)

Posted by Laura

IMG_3035First sweet corn of the season! Given this cool weather we’ve been having I wasn’t sure it’d be ready but the crew headed out to harvest this morning and turns out that it’s looking good. Harvesting sweet corn can be tricky. To actually see the kernels, you would have to peel quite a bit of the husk away and that can damage an immature ear. Instead, we look for less invasive indications of ripeness. Ripe sweet corn has filled out the husk and it has dark silks.  In the interest of quality control we do peel some ears back and taste them – yum!

Amazing recipes for sweet corn and everything we grow on the farm are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Cucumbers: We have have some regular green slicers and we’re also growing a new variety called Silver Slicer. It is related to one of our favorite heirlooms, Boothby’s Blonde, and it has the same great heirloom flavor just with larger fruit!
  • Fava Beans: We had a later than usual planting this year and we’re thrilled that they are finally ready! There are lots of tips and a dozen great recipes for fava beans at Cook With What You Have. And here is one of my favorite ways to cook them whole and in the shell – Grilled Fresh Fava’s
  • Collard Greens: Nice to have some cooking green and these are quick to cook and very versatile.
  • Sweet Corn: for dinner tonight! 
  • Baby Cabbage: Mostly green and maybe a few purple cabbages – all will make a great small slaw.
  • Garlic: Nice big heads of Early Chinese Pink.
  • Parsley: Try using it like you would spinach or chard – chop up a heaping pile and sauté and add to pasta, polenta, frittata, etc. Or make hummus with the fava beans and add a big handful of parsley to that. I also pick whole leaves off the bunch and add them to my green salad. And you can try one of these three tasty Tabbouleh recipes recommendations… Yotam Ottolenghi from his cookbook Jerusalem which includes pomegranates and a traditional spice mixture. From David Lebovitz on his blog Living the Sweet Life in Paris – he is very particular and this recipe is very good. And last but not least – the simplest version which is also really good – from Ina Garten at her Barefoot Contessa series.
  • Popcorn: Pop on the cob in the microwave in a brown bag 3 min max. Or take it off the cob and pop however you’d like. If you have grinder – this popcorn also makes great polenta.  
  • Fingerling Potatoes: These Austrian Crescent are a waxy potato and make a nice potato salad.

Coming soon… Green, Yellow & Purple String Beans!

In Your Share (Aug 1st edition)

Posted by Laura

ParsleyWe’re singing the praises of summer parsley! The crew harvested big bunches this week to encourage a shift in the way you approach Italian flat leaf parsley. We want you to stop thinking of it as an herb to use sparingly and start thinking about it as another dark leafy green. Use it like you would spinach or chard – chop up a heaping pile and sauté and add to pasta, polenta, frittata, etc. Try making hummus with the fava beans and add a big handful of parsley to that. I also pick whole leaves off the bunch and add them to my green salad. And you can try my three tasty Tabbouleh recipes recommendations below.

 

Amazing recipes for parsley and everything we grow on the farm are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: Sweet summer carrots are delicious!
  • Cucumbers: We have have some regular green slicers and we’re also growing a new variety called Silver Slicer. It is related to one of our favorite heirlooms, Boothby’s Blonde, and we are happy to report that it has the same great heirloom flavor with larger fruit – yum!
  • Fava Beans: We had a later than usual planting this year and we’re thrilled that they are finally ready! There are lots of tips and a dozen great recipes for fava beans at Cook With What You Have. And here is one of my favorite ways to cook them whole and in the shell – Grilled Fresh Fava’s
  • Butterhead Lettuce: Makes a beautiful salad.
  • Joi Choi: There are lots of ways to cook these tasty asian greens. One of my favorites is this Noodle Salad with Shitake Mushrooms.
  • Napa Cabbage: We’ve had a bumper crop of these tasty cabbage, but this is the last harvest from this field. Enjoy one more batch of slaw or kim chi, and don’t worry – we’ll have more cabbage this fall.
  • Parsley: There are some great ideas for using parsley above and here are my favorite variations on the Tabbouleh theme. Know these will be even better once we have fresh tomatoes, but it’s really the parsley that makes it! Yotam Ottolenghi from his cookbook Jerusalem which includes pomegranates and a traditional spice mixture. From David Lebovitz on his blog Living the Sweet Life in Paris – he is very particular and this recipe is very good. And last but not least – the simplest version which is also really good – from Ina Garten at her Barefoot Contessa series.
  • New Red Potatoes: The skins are so thin on the first of the season potatoes you hardly need to peel them!

Coming soon… Zucchini & Patty Pan Summer Squash!