Laura Masterson and Patty at 47th Avenue FarmLet nature set your table with fresh and delicious produce, locally farmed in tune with the seasons. With our CSA – now in its 21st season! – you pick up a bag or more of bounty every week for less than $3.30 a day for a half share, or $5.95 a day to feed a family of four.

Shares are limited and move as fast as pole beans, so reserve your space today. To learn more and sign up, start with our How the Farm Works page, or go straight to the info/order pages for our two pickup sites, SE Portland and Lake Oswego.

Look forward to seeing you on Facebook, on Instagram, and at pick-up!

An amazing winter – our 21st season! – of lovely, responsibly farmed veggies is just around the bend starting late October!

Sign up for occasional news from our farm, advance notices on shares and events, special offers, and more!

Getting Oriented

(Last summer share pickup dates:
SE PDX: October 24th
Luscher: Ocboter 26th)

Winter Pick-Up Schedule

47th Ave Farm (SE)
Tuesdays 5-7pm on the following dates:

October 31
November 14 & 28
December 12
January 9 & 23
February 6 & 20
March 6 & 20
April 3 & 17

Luscher Farm
Thursdays 5-7pm on the following dates:

November 2, 16 & 30
December 14
January 11 & 25
February 8 & 22
March 8 & 22
April 5 & 19


Southeast
Pick-Up Notes:

We live on a very narrow gravel road, which can easily become congested during pickup. Please take some alternative form of transportation if possible. If you drive, it’s also extremely helpful if you park at least a block away and walk in.

Please bring your own plastic, paper or earth-friendly bags. We can re-use clean cardboard egg cartons.

Ask us about our bucket exchange program if you’d like to bring your compost to the farm.


SNAP logo

Books we like

ALT

FARM NEWS, NOTES AND (AGRI)CULTURE

In Your Share (Oct. 16th edition)

Posted by Laura

I love that the Watermelon Radish, so humble looking on the outside, is shocking pink on the inside! They have a sweet peppery radish flavor, but are usually more mild than a little red radish. They are a good source of Vitamin C and calcium and they are are full of healthy isothiocyanates.  This radish is actually an heirloom daikon, so can be used similarly. The color often fades when cooked so to preserve that gorgeous magenta color, use them raw or pickled.

Speaking of winter root crops – we are signing people up for our Winter CSA Share which is starting SOON!

Amazing recipes for watermelon radish and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Broccoli: The first heads of fall broccoli are often small, but the size will continue to increase over the next few weeks. The heads are tasty, but so are the leaves and stem so don’t forget to eat those too!
  • Collard Greens: Fall greens are beautiful and delicious this time of year.
  • Dill: Tasty with fingerling potato salad or in a yogurt sauce for dipping sweet peppers and radish.
  • Candy Sweet Onions: We had a great crop of sweet onions but they don’t store long so this will likely be the last week of this variety. If you’re joining us for the winter share we’ll have white, cippolini, yellow and red onions in addition to garlic and leeks!
  • Red Cabbage: Makes a great slaw or cook it up with this quick and easy recipe for Roasted Cabbage Wedges. And if you are looking for more inspiration there are almost 3 dozen cabbage recipes at the Cook With What You Have website.
  • Red & Yellow Italian Style Sweet Peppers: Happy to have more Stocky Red Roasters and Gathers Gold. Both of these varieties were developed locally by Frank Morton at Wild Garden Seeds. He de-hybridized some italian peppers, spent a few years selecting the beautiful, tasty and productive progeny and we’re happy to be growing the results.
  • Hot Peppers: Tasty in any dish where you’d like to add a little heat! Plenty of jalapeños this week so I’m planning to make poppers! A couple of my favorite recipes are Baked Rings and Whole Roasted Jalapeños. Hot peppers can also be frozen for future use – take stems off and remove seeds if you want to, then sauté or roast them and freeze in single serving size containers. Nice to be able to add some summer spice to winter soups and stews.
  • Fingerling Potatoes: Not that you probably need a recipe for potatoes, but just reminding you that this Calabrian Recipe with roasted peppers is really good!
  • Watermelon Radish: Try this simple Radish & Apple Salad at the Cook With What You Have website.

Coming soon… Winter Share!!

 

In Your Share (Oct 9th edition)

Posted by Laura

Gill’s Goldn Pippin, photo from Adaptive Seeds

We are starting the winter squash season with one of my favorites – Gill’s Golden Pippin! This little single serving size squash was originally bred right here in Oregon in the mid-20th century by the Gill Brother’s Seed Company. With its pretty orange skin and acorn squash ribbing you might be tempted to use it for decoration, and that’s ok temporarily. But these are so dang delicious that it would be a terrible waste if you didn’t eat them!

Speaking of winter squash – we are signing people up for our Winter CSA Share which is starting SOON!

Amazing recipes for winter squash and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Broccoli: The first heads of fall broccoli are often small, but the size will continue to increase over the next few weeks. The heads are tasty, but so are the leaves and stem so don’t forget to eat those too!
  • Rainbow Chard: Fall greens are beautiful and delicious this time of year.
  • Parsley: This versatile vegetable is both an herb and it is greens. I prefer to treat it more like the latter since it contains all the healthy goodness of other dark leafy greens plus has a distinct flavor and subtle sweetness. I like to sauté a pile of chopped parsley in olive oil by itself or in combo with other greens like chard, spinach or kale. Then add them to pasta, scrambled eggs, polenta… yum! Parsley also makes great pesto, chimmichuri and salsa verde. More on my favorite green sauces here.
  • Candy Sweet Onions: These are nice sautéed with parsley and greens (see above). Or roast them with peppers and potatoes.
  • Red & Yellow Italian Style Sweet Peppers: Finally we have some Stocky Red Roasters and Gathers Gold. Both of these varieties were developed locally by Frank Morton at Wild Garden Seeds. He de-hybridized some italian peppers, spent a few years selecting the beautiful, tasty and productive progeny and we’re happy to be growing the results. These are larger than Jimmy Nardello peppers and have a significantly thicker skin. Great for eating raw or roasted!
  • Anaheim & Poblano Peppers: These are definitely spicier and way more interesting than your average green pepper : ) Try this creative variation on the classic Chile Relleno
  • Hot Peppers: Tasty in any dish where you’d like to add a little heat! Plenty of jalapeños this week so I’m planning to make poppers! A couple of my favorite recipes are Baked Rings and Whole Roasted Jalapeños. Hot peppers can also be frozen for future use – take stems off and remove seeds if you want to then sauté or roast them and freeze in single serving size containers. Nice to be able to add some summer spice to winter soups and stews.
  • Yellow Potatoes: Not that you probably need a recipe for potatoes, but just reminding you that this Calabrian Recipe with roasted peppers is really good!
  • Winter Squash: This Gill’s Golden Pippin is easy – just cut in half, lay cut side down on a baking sheet coated with a little olive oil and roast in the oven at 350 until tender. It is so sweet it hardly needs toppings : )

Coming soon… Purple, Orange and Romanesco Cauliflower

 

In Your Share (Oct 2nd edition)

Posted by Laura

We’re done with tomatoes for the season, but there are some great little tomatillos in the share this week! Also known as Mexican Husk Tomato, these are an interesting cousin to the tomato. A tomatillo fossil found in Argentina last year may be the oldest evidence of that plant family – Solanaceae, or nightshades – so far discovered. At 52 million years old, ancestors to the tomatillo may have been food for the dinosaurs! Thought to have been developed from a wild ancestor by the aztecs, the modern tomatillo (Physalis ixocarpa) is still a staple crop throughout central and south america. And we like to eat it up here too. The flowers are a distinctive yellow with black centers. The fruit can be green, yellow or purple and is always enclosed in a papery wrapper. Usually when fruits are mature they pop through the bottom of the husk. It adds a distinctive and complex flavor to any dish. Check out this recipe from Rick Bayless that uses tomatillos, cilantro, garlic, and hot peppers in your share this week.

Amazing recipes for tomatillos and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Brussel Sprout Tops or Collard Greens: Fall greens are so good this time of year!
  • Cilantro: This is always good in salsa, but also makes a tasty addition to Thai dishes and makes a nice pesto too.
  • Garlic: I’ve been roasting lots of garlic lately with peppers and potatoes and really like them in this Calabrian Recipe at Cook With What You Have.
  • Jimmy Nardello Sweet Peppers: This is definitely one of my favorite peppers – the fruit is beautiful red, thin skinned, early ripening and so sweet!! A traditional Italian frying pepper, this particular variety is named for the grandson of the man  who brought to from Basilicata, Italy to Connecticut in the 1880’s. In addition to great flavor, I love that it is in the Slow Food Ark of Taste and has such a great story. More info about the people and the pepper can be found here.
  • Anaheim & Poblano Peppers: These are way more interesting than your average green pepper : ) Try this creative variation on the classic Chile Relleno
  • Hot Peppers: Tasty in any dish where you’d like to add a little heat! Plenty of jalapeños this week so I’m planning to make poppers! A couple of my favorite recipes are Baked Rings and Whole Roasted Jalapeños.
  • Red Potatoes: Not that you probably need a recipe for red potatoes, but just reminding you that this Calabrian Recipe with roasted peppers is really good!
  • Tomatillos: This would make a great green salsa with the cilantro, garlic, & peppers also in the share this week.

Coming soon… Fall Broccoli & Cauliflower!!

 

Farm to Table Dinner at Luscher!

Posted by Laura

Today is your last chance to buy tickets!! Hope you can join us for…

Twilight on the Trail – A Farm to Table Dinner at Luscher Farm
Luscher Farm | 125 Rosemont Rd | West Linn, Oregon 97068
Saturday, September 30, 2017 from 5:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Enjoy an evening strolling the back fields and historic barn at Luscher Farm while you sip and graze from a seasonally inspired Farm to Table menu.  We begin with cocktails and appetizers as we take a short tour of the fields, to be followed by dinner, dessert and live music in the barn.  Many of the ingredients for the meal are graciously provided by 47th Farm, grown just 100 meters from the barn and created by Chef Sarah Carlson of the Red Hare.   A selection of complimentary local wines and beer have been paired with dinner.  Music provided by: Dry Land Farmers.

If you enjoy the walking paths, community gardens, dog park, and athletic fields at Luscher Farm, we encourage you to come and learn more about the design plan and future of your beloved farm.  Proceeds from the dinner benefit the expansion of trails, benches, and trees throughout the property.  Your tax-deductible contribution kicks off the fundraising campaign for this master land use plan.

Tickets are limited and available only thru the end of the day TODAY Sept 20th!!

$85 per person.  Check out the menu and purchase your tickets HERE

Garden party attire and garden-friendly footwear are encouraged.

Due to the nature of the event, we cannot accommodate strict restrictions such as vegan diets, medical diets, or severe food allergies.  Menu will be posted closer to the event, and you can expect lots of fabulous veggies, locally raised meats and fish.  If you have questions, please email:  luscherfriends@gmail.com

Facebook event Page:  https://www.facebook.com/events/349080472172517

twilight-emial promo 1.pdf

In Your Share (Sept 11th edition)

Posted by Laura

Hot Peppers!! Add a little spice to your life with these Jalapeño, Czech Black and Bulgarian Carrot peppers. Hot peppers are now thoroughly integrated into cultures across the world – think Thai sriracha, North African harissa or Portugese piri-piri. It is almost impossible to imagine these cuisines without their characteristic spicy stuff, but the pepper plant is native only to mesoamerica. The indigenous cultures there may have domesticated peppers as early as 5000 BC. While Columbus did bring some peppers back with him to Europe, it appears that it was actually the Portuguese who spread chilies around the world. Starting in the 1500’s the Portuguese crisscrossed the globe and shared peppers, and for better worse many other things, with cultures on almost every continent. Ironically, while chile peppers were likely used by indigenous cultures in North America, most spicy “american” food has its roots in the peppers brought to this country by african slaves. If you’re interested in more details, you might enjoy this Brief History of Chile Peppers.

Amazing recipes for Hot Peppers and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Fresh Beans: Purple “green” beans actually do turn green when you cook them : ) And we may also have a few yellow wax beans which are round and tender with a sweet crunchy beany taste.  
  • Chard: This rainbow chard grows in luminescent shades of red, orange, pink, yellow and everything in between. Enjoy the color, then cook it and enjoy the greens! I like to use it as a healthy and hearty replacement for cooked spinach. Chard works well in omelets, polenta, over pasta, in lasagne, etc. Or try this Lebanese recipe for Stuffed Chard, called Mehchi Selek, recommended by shareholder Laurence Qamar.
  • Eggplant: Beautiful Japanese eggplant with a few pink and Italian mixed in.
  • Garlic: Add raw to Herb Salsa Verde with parsley below or roast with Anaheim or Poblano peppers.
  • Italian Parsley: I like to think of parsley more like greens then herbs. It is more flavorful than some greens, but the flavor isn’t overwhelming so I like to use it in bulk. Often herbs are used sparingly, but  I prefer recipes that feature significant amounts of parsley. Traditional Lebanese tabbouleh often includes a much higher ration of parsley to grain than we’re used to.  Yom Ottolenghi has some great parsley recipes in his cookbooks including this charred corn salad with parsley, onion and jalapeño. I’m also a huge fan of Herb Salsa Verde.
  • Anaheim & Poblano Peppers: These are way more interesting than your average green pepper : ) Try this creative variation on the classic Chile Relleno
  • Hot Peppers: Tasty in any dish where you’d like to add a little heat!
  • Red Potatoes: Makes a great potato salad.
  • Tomatoes: Heirloom and slicing tomatoes are perfect this time of year!

Coming soon… Tomatillos!!

 

In Your Share (Sept 4th edition)

Posted by Laura

Colorful chard in the share this week! These spectacular greens come in almost every color of the rainbow and are probably even more nutritious than they are beautiful.

Amazing recipes for Rainbow Swiss Chard and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Fresh Beans: Purple “green” beans actually do turn green when you cook them : ) And we may also have a few yellow romano beans which  have a flat pod, but a very similar sweet crunchy beany taste.  
  • Chard: This rainbow chard grows in luminescent shades of red, orange, pink, yellow and everything in between. Enjoy the color, then cook it and enjoy the greens! I like to use it as a healthy and hearty replacement for cooked spinach. Chard works well in omelets, polenta, over pasta, in lasagne, etc. Or try this Lebanese recipe for Stuffed Chard, called Mehchi Selek, from shareholder Laurence Qamar
  • Sweet Corn: Must be summertime…
  • Eggplant: Beautiful Japanese eggplant with a few pink and Italian mixed in.
  • Walla Sweet Onions: These are the best!
  • Italian Parsley: I like to think of parsley more like greens then herbs. It is more flavorful than some greens, but the flavor isn’t overwhelming so I like to use it in bulk. Often herbs are used sparingly, but  I prefer recipes that feature significant amounts of parsley. Traditional Lebanese tabbouleh often includes a much higher ration of parsley to grain than we’re used to.  Yom Ottolenghi has some great parsley recipes in his cookbooks including this charred corn salad with parsley, onion and jalapeño. I’m also a huge fan of Herb Salsa Verde.
  • Jalapeno Peppers: Tasty in any dish where you’d like to add a little heat!
  • Padrón Peppers: This style of pepper originated in the Spanish municipality of Padrón, in Galicia. For traditional spanish tapas these are fried in a cast iron pan with olive oil and salt. Most peppers are not hot but 10-20% will surprise you with some heat : ) That is part of the appeal of this pepper! You can find more info about the history of patron’s and how to cook them here.
  • Summer Squash: Assorted shapes, sizes and colors and they’re all tasty. Grill slabs of zucchini or patty pan on the BBQ or slice them into a gratin or use a big one for Zucchini Bread.
  • Tomatoes: Heirloom and slicing tomatoes are perfect this time of year!

Coming soon… More Tomatoes!!

 

In Your Share (Aug 14th edition)

Posted by Laura

Sweet Corn Field

The Sweet Corn also really liked that heat wave! Growing corn in the PNW can be challenging sometimes. Early in my farming career we tried quite a few varieties and eventually settled on Sugar Buns and it has performed reliably most seasons. It is what is know in the sweet corn world as a sugary enhanced (se) variety. Developed using traditional breeding techniques, it is sweeter than many old fashioned sweet corn varieties, but not cloyingly sweet like newer Super Sweet types. The newer Super Sweet types also require strict isolation distances otherwise pollen drift can cause their super sweet kernels to get super starchy. More about Sweet Corn Typology here. Sugar Buns has good cold germination – which is helpful in our chilly wet spring weather. In addition, the flavor holds well which means that you can keep it in your fridge for a few days and not have to eat it tonight. Although I’ve been know to snack on it in the field and it is really good that way too!

Amazing recipes for Sweet Corn and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Basil: Lovely bunches of green and purple basil!
  • Sweet Corn: Must be summertime…
  • Cucumbers: We’ll have extra Cukes and Cabbage available for sale in bulk this week! If you want to do some preserving, just let me know. Here is one of my favorite quick pickles – this is my Mom’s recipe for Sweet Refrigerator Pickles.
  • Eggplant: Beautiful Japanese eggplant with a few pink and Italian mixed in.
  • Garlic: Yum! 
  • Lettuce: These lovely and refreshing summer crisp heads make a great summer salad.
  • Summer Squash: Assorted shapes, sizes and colors and they’re all tasty. Grill slabs of zucchini or patty pan on the BBQ or slice them into a gratin or use a big one for Zucchini Bread.
  • Tomatoes: I’m excited about quick roasted tomatoes with garlic and basil : )

Coming soon… Hot Peppers!

Beautiful Corn!

Posted by Laura

All types of corn can be challenging to grow in the Pacific NW. In most regions of the country, corn is direct seeded in the spring. We transplant both sweet corn and popcorn in order to give it a head start in the spring. This is a technique we learned from Josh Volk when he was at Sauvie Island Organics. Transplanting is especially helpful if we have a cold wet spring since most corn seed struggles to germinate when the soil temp is below 60 degrees. This is the reason that most conventional farmers plant treated seed. The corn plants can grow in cool weather, but the seeds need warmth to germinate and thrive. If we plant seeds directly into the cold wet soil they often just rot in the ground. If we plant the seeds in the greenhouse and keep them warm & toasty for a week or two then the small plants are usually strong enough to handle the weather after that. Baby corn plants look like a single blade of grass attached to the seed and have a small fragile root when we transplant them. Less than a week old they’re too small to fend for themselves but older than two weeks they have a larger tap root that can break and that is stressful for the plants. The sweet corn variety we grow is Sugar Buns which we have found to be a good early producer with a nice balance of sweet and old fashioned corn flavor. The variety of popcorn/polenta corn we grow is Amish Butter. Our seed originally came from Anthony Boutard at Ayers Creek Farm and if you are interested in corn then his book, Beautiful Corn: America’s Original Grain from Seed to Plate is a must read! Or check out this video about Anthony & his corn.