Laura Masterson and Patty at 47th Avenue FarmLet nature set your table with fresh and delicious produce, locally farmed in tune with the seasons. With our CSA – now in its 21st season! – you pick up a bag or more of bounty every week for less than $3.50 a day for a half share, or $6.30 a day to feed a family of four.

Shares are limited and move as fast as pole beans, so reserve your space today. To learn more and sign up, start with our How the Farm Works page, or go straight to the info/order pages for our two pickup sites, SE Portland and Lake Oswego.

Look forward to seeing you on Facebook, on Instagram, and at pick-up!

An amazing summer – our 22nd season! – of delicious, responsibly farmed produce is happening soon – sign up today!

Sign up for occasional news from our farm, advance notices on shares and events, special offers, and more!

Getting Oriented

Summer Pick-Up Schedule

47th Ave Farm (SE)
Every week on
Tuesdays 5-7pm,
May 15th – Oct 23rd, 2018

Luscher Farm
Every week on
Thursdays 5-7pm,
May 17th – Oct 25th, 2018

Get signed up today!


 

Southeast
Pick-Up Notes:

We live on a very narrow gravel road, which can easily become congested during pickup. Please take some alternative form of transportation if possible. If you drive, it’s also extremely helpful if you park at least a block away and walk in.

Please bring your own plastic, paper or earth-friendly bags.

Ask us about our bucket exchange program if you’d like to bring your compost to the farm.


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FARM NEWS, NOTES AND (AGRI)CULTURE

In Your Share (June 18th edition)

Posted by Laura

The greens are looking good this week! Across the world, cultures use dark leafy greens in a myriad of creative recipes. This week we have at least two continents represented with Joi Choi from Asia & Cimi di Rapa from Europe. These greens may be worlds apart geographically, but botanically they are closely related. As part of the Brassica genus, both likely decendended from the same 3 ancestral species. Included in this genus are important food crops, oilseed crops and also some frustrating weeds. Even just within the food crops there is an incredible amount of diversity as plants have been selected for edible roots, stems, leaves, buds, flowers and seeds. Most of the brassicas are extremely nutritious and often have antioxidant, anticancer and immune enhancing properties.

You’ll find recipes for greens and everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Joi Choi: A beautiful and tasty brassica, it is classified as a B. rapa var. chinensis. This species also includes a wide variety of other roots & greens from tatsoi to turnips to napa cabbage. This choi is one of my favorites! It has broad white stems that are mild and crunchy with tender dark green leaves. It makes a terrific addition to stir fry or try this Soba Noodle Salad with Choi.
  • Fava Beans: Beautiful, early, flavorful and fun! This time of year you don’t have to double peel if you don’t want to. In fact, my favorite way to cook these is whole and in the pod. Try this Fresh Grilled Fava Beans recipe.
  • Baby Lettuce Heads: Let the summer salads begin!
  • Spring Garlic: Lovely plump fresh garlic bulbs for you in the share today. Left in the field, it will become storage garlic – but it isn’t there yet. Use these in any recipe that calls for regular garlic but since they do not have the dried wrapper around the bulb if needs to be stored in the fridge and eaten sooner rather than later.
  • Spring Onions: These are tender and tasty! We call them spring onions to differentiate them from storage onions. This time of year the spring onions have beautiful greens on them which can be used like just like a green onion. You may see red, yellow and white onions – or a mix of all three – in your share this week
  • Sweet Pea Microgreens: These little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Red Round Radish: These are super tasty this time of year. Later in the season they can get pretty spicy, but these just have a little zing to them. Great in salads or as a snack on the crudite plate. Or try this Radish Butter spread.
  • Cimi di Rapa:These greens go by many names aka Sessantina Grossa, Spring Raab, Rabe or Rapini and are classified as B. rapa var. rapa. Common throughout the southern Mediterranean, especially in Italy, Spain and Portugal, they are traditionally boiled or sautéed with olive oil and hot pepper and often served as a side alongside pork or over pasta. My sister worked for a summer in Bari, Italy many years ago and I love this simple pasta – Orecciette with Cimi di Rapa – from that region.

Coming soon… Happy Solstice! 

In Your Share (June 11th, 2018 edition)

Posted by Laura

Let the sugar snap peas begin! We seeded peas early this spring, cultivated them several times with the electric tractor and horses to keep the weeds at bay, then built a sturdy trellis for them. The vines have been climbing vigorously up the trellis and flowering profusely and now we have the first plump ripe pods ready for share this week – yay!

The sugar snap peas we grow have a sweet crunchy edible pod with tasty sweet peas inside. The whole pod and peas are meant to be eaten together. They are usually eaten raw, but can also be steamed or sautéed. Like sweet corn, these peas are best eaten asap otherwise the sugar in the peas will turn starchy over time. Don’t confuse your sugar snap peas (sweet peas, plump sweet pod) with shelling peas (tasty peas, pod is not edible, aka green peas) or snow peas (undeveloped peas, flat pods, often found in asian cuisine). I’m not opposed to the other kinds but sugar snap peas are my favorite and I hope you enjoy them too : )

Last week my friend Walt Bernard from Workhorse Workshops in Dorena, OR delivered my new horse drawn plow! He helped me get it set up and we started plowing up a field with some thick cover crops on it. I’m really looking forward to integrating this tool into the farm fieldwork rotation. I posted some photos of the team in action on the website and on Facebook.

You’ll find recipes everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Baby Lettuce Heads: Let the summer salads begin!
  • Spring Garlic: Lovely plump fresh garlic bulbs for you in the share today. Spring garlic is harvested after the bulbs have formed, but before the cloves are individually wrapped. Left in the field, it will become storage garlic – but it isn’t there yet. Use these in any recipe that calls for regular garlic but since they do not have the dried wrapper around the bulb if needs to be stored in the fridge and eaten sooner rather than later.
  • Spring Onions: These are tender and tasty! We call them spring onions to differentiate them from storage onions. This time of year the spring onions have beautiful greens on them which can be used like just like a green onion. You may see red, yellow and white onions – or a mix of all three – in your share this week
  • Zesty Daikon Microgreens: These little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Red Round Radish: These are super tasty this time of year. Later in the season they can get pretty spicy, but these just have a little zing to them. Great in salads or as a snack on the crudite plate. Or try this Radish Butter spread.
  • Spinach: This crop likes the cool weather we’ve been having and the leaves are thick, succulent and deeply savoyed. This would make a beautiful spinach salad or can be sautéed.
  • Hakuri Salad Turnips: These look like giant white radish, but the flavor is sweet crunchy and mild. As the name implies, they can definitely be eaten raw or roasted. Greens are good too – cook them up alone or with other greens like spinach.

 

Coming soon… more Sugar Snap Peas! 

 

Avian Biodiversity on Organic Farms

Posted by Laura

Baby killdeer camouflaged in the onion field.

It is widely held belief amongst organic farmers that providing habitat for beneficial insects and diverse bird populations on our farms is a net gain for the wildlife and the farmers. Given the complexity of the ecosystem this can be a difficult hypothesis to test, but the Avian Biodiversity Team is up to the challenge.  For the last several years this team of veterinarians, ornithologists and entomologists from WSU, Cornell & OSU has partnered with organic farmers to better understand the complex and ever-changing ecosystems that we call farms and the preliminary research results are exciting.

This week Olivia Smith, a PhD candidate at WSU surveyed all the birds at our Grand Island Farm and at Luscher Farm and reported back…

“I think you have a few Brewer’s Blackbird nests in the SW corner of the Grand Island Road farm in the old allium patch. They were mobbing me while I was walking back there. I also saw a really adorable Killdeer family at Luscher today.”

At the Grand Island location, she also observed American Robin, Barn Swallow, Brewer’s Blackbird, European Starling, and Killdeer foraging in/above our row crops. She observed quite a few species in the cover crop/pasture areas: American Goldfinch, American Robin, Barn Swallow, Brown-headed Cowbird, Brewer’s Blackbird, European Starling, Killdeer, White-crowned Sparrow, and Cliff Swallow. And she saw two Cedar Waxwings pulling wool off the wire of the pasture fence to build a nest.  At Luscher, there wasn’t as much activity but she saw European Starling, Killdeer, Mourning Dove, and Violet-green Swallow foraging in/above our crop fields.

The Avian Biodiversity Team just got an eOrganic article accepted about Identifying Bird Nests on Farm Structures. And last year they also published a series about beneficial insectivores. The articles are hyperlinked, so you can navigate to 2 others from the first article: https://articles.extension.org/pages/74435/identification-diet-and-management-of-swallows-and-swifts-common-on-organic-farms. In addition, they hosted a webinar in February that may be of interest: http://articles.extension.org/pages/74608/tools-for-farm-biodiversity-webinar.

We really appreciate the great work they are doing to help us better understand the complex web of critters that we share the farm with!

 

In Your Share (May 21, 2018 edition)

Posted by Laura

We are excited to have fava beans in the share so early this season! I had become frustrated with fall planted fava beans in recent years. They can be magnificent – like our current crop – but they can also fail miserably. The timing is challenging and size matters. If the plants are too large in the fall, they will be more susceptible to freezing. If the plants are too small, then they won’t have very many beans in the spring. Three years ago we planted a whole field and had a fabulous stand of fava bean plants – just the right size going into the winter, but despite all the TLC we gave them, the crop froze out completely. Planting the field is alot of work so I vowed not to do that again. But then I accidentally discovered a much easier way to plant in the fall – just till in the spring crop after they set seed! This means we need to weed our spring fava beans a few times after harvest and get the timing right on the tilling – late August or early Sept. But that is a heck of a lot easier then planting by hand!! And I’d need to till the field anyway – so the fact that we get more beans out of the deal is a bonus. And if they die over the winter, I’m sad, but my investment was minimal so we just plant again in the spring. Enjoy these fortuitous fava beans!

We still have a few spots available in the CSA so feel free to let your friends know they can still get in on the bounty with a prorated Summer CSA share share starting next week.

You’ll find recipes everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Cauliflower: Beautiful, big heads! I’m excited about Cauliflower Steaks with Green Garlic Aioli. Or try this Cauliflower Pasta from one of our favorite local hangouts in Sellwood – Gino’s Restaurant.
  • Popcorn: Whole cobs are fun to pop in the microwave – just put them in a paper bag, loosely fold the top down, and cook them on high for 2-3min. Warning – 3 min max!! More time in the microwave can set the cob on fire. You can also take the kernels off the cob and use your favorite popping technique.
  • Dried Cayenne Peppers: We grow a variety of hot peppers in the summer time, but this is the best one by far for drying. It has a thin skin and the meat of the pepper is flavorful and spicy. You can add a whole one to a pot of soup or stew – or grind it up and make your own DIY Hot Pepper Flakes.
  • Fava Beans: Beautiful, early, flavorful and fun! This time of year you don’t have to double peel if you don’t want to. In fact, my favorite way to cook these is whole and in the pod. Try this Fresh Grilled Fava Beans recipe.
  • Garlic Whistles aka Scapes: Roasted garlic scapes are SOOOO good! I coat them with olive oil, add salt & pepper and spread a pile of them on a cookie sheet. Set them under the broiler until they start to wilt and caramelize. The BBQ works well too – just be careful they don’t slip through the grill. Makes for fun finger food!
  • Green Garlic: Lovely plump garlic stalks for you in the share today. Green garlic is planted alongside our storage garlic in the fall. It grows a vigorous root system through the winter, and pushes up its little green stalks in the spring. We harvest green garlic now – when the greens are tender and before it has much of a bulb.  Similar to leeks – the white part is most tender, but the green tops have good garlic flavor too. Enjoy these little beauties while they last!
  • Walla Walla Sweet Spring Onions: These are tender and tasty! We call them spring onions to differentiate them from storage onions. This time of year the spring onions have beautiful greens on them which can be used like just like a green onion.
  • Yellow Potato: These yellow Nicola potatoes are great roasted, steamed or boiled.
  • Radish Microgreens: These zesty little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.

 

Coming soon… Hakurei Turnip and Round Red Radish! 

 

Our summer CSA comes with a chef!

Posted by Laura

Katherine DeumlingOne of the things people love about our CSA is eating in tune with the seasons. We meticulously research varietals that thrive in our climate, and plant and harvest them when they want to be planted and harvested. We work for nature, not the other way around!

That gives each pickup a wonderful sense of discovery, but that’s only half the fun: then you get to eat what you bring home!

That’s why every 47th Avenue Farm share comes with members-only access to Cook With What You Have, an amazing online resource curated by local chef and food activist Katherine Deumling that’s packed with great recipes – and even better, specifically tuned to what’s in your CSA pickup each week.

Give it a try yourself, for free. Katherine’s unlocked two easy recipes featuring cauliflower and green garlic, two (of many) veggies our shareholders can look forward to among the first pickups.
Give them a try!

Yum. Katherine says, “I’ve been collaborating with Laura for seven years, and I love how farms like hers bring so much beautiful, nutritious and delicious food to our tables. And knowing what to do with that fresh produce is a big part of a healthy and vibrant community and planet. You don’t need fancy tools or ingredients to nourish yourself and your loved ones everyday.”

Shareholders tell me they’ve gone for stretches where they just choose a veggie from our share, pull up her site, and just randomly pick any recipe she’s got for it. They’ve never been disappointed. It’s like having a personal CSA chef consultant!

I’d like to share it with you. Our pioneering Summer Veggie CSA – with two pickups in SE Portland and Lake Oswego’s Luscher Farm – starts today, on May 15th. Join us!

First Summer CSA Share!!

Posted by Laura

Welcome to the first Summer CSA Pickup of the 2018 season!! The spring planting season has been almost perfect this year giving us a nice mix of sunshine and rainy days. We always try and keep the farm pantry full, so in addition to spring planted veggies in your share you will also see some overwintering crops like cauliflower and garlic, and storage crops like potatoes and beans. This makes for a diverse and bountiful basket throughout the year!

I think it is interesting this time of year to consider how the types of spring crops you’ll see in your share is dictated by the trajectory of the growing plant. The seed germinates driving the primary root down into the soil. Then the cotyledon emerges stretching for the sky. After it sheds its seed coat, the true leaves emerge. Next, come secondary roots and above ground the stem elongates and more leaves are produced. For this reason, traditional spring veggies are often roots, shoots & leaves: microgreens, lettuce, herbs, radish, carrots, & beets are all variations on this same theme. Most plants need to produce a significant amount of vegetative growth before they are able to make flowers and fruits. This is why things like broccoli (flower buds) & tomatoes (technically a fruit) are usually harvested later in the season. Of course we turn this on it’s head by having a few things in storage, or growing on the farm over the winter, but in general that is a pretty simple synopsis of springtime food.

We still have a few spots available in the CSA so feel free to let your friends know they can still get in on the bounty with a prorated Summer CSA share share starting next week.

You’ll find recipes everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Dry Beans: This Calypso variety is a variation on the black bean theme that has a white overlay. It is also sometimes called the Yin/Yang or Orca bean because of the distinctive color pattern. Use them in any recipe that calls for black beans.
  • Cauliflower: Beautiful, big heads! I’m excited about Cauliflower Steaks with Green Garlic Aioli. Or try this Cauliflower Pasta from one of our favorite local hangouts in Sellwood – Gino’s Restaurant.
  • Cooking Celery: The flavor has a slightly stronger flavor than celery from the store, but it really shines when the sugars start to caramelize. Try roasting or sautéing – then add to soup or au gratin or your favorite celery recipe.
  • Green Garlic: Lovely plump garlic stalks for you in the share today. Green garlic is planted alongside our storage garlic in the fall. It grows a vigorous root system through the winter, and pushes up its little green stalks in the spring. We harvest green garlic now – when the greens are tender and before it has much of a bulb.  Similar to leeks – the white part is most tender, but the green tops have good garlic flavor too. Enjoy these little beauties while they last!
  • Baby Lettuce: I’m loving these compact baby heads of red romaine!  Nice to have an early summer salad : )
  • Walla Walla Sweet Spring Onions: These are tender and tasty! We call them spring onions to differentiate them from storage onions. This time of year the spring onions have beautiful greens on them which can be used like just like a green onion.
  • Yellow Potato: These yellow Nicola potatoes are great roasted, steamed or boiled.
  • Radish Microgreens: These zesty little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.

Coming soon… A Whole Summer Full of Yummy Veggies!

 

This beautiful spring means a bountiful summer!

Posted by Laura

Farming Grand Island under a Turner-like skyWhat a glorious spring it’s been! Just the right amount of sun, a perfect range of temperatures, and the kind of pristine air only rain showers can bring. We’ve been mowing down lush flowering fields of winter cover crop and planting spring & summer veggies. Whether I’m driving the draft horses or the electric tractor it is remarkable time of year to be out in the fields. Churning up the scent of fresh, pure soil, I’m overwhelmed with the sense that anything is possible.

Boy, I think to myself, this is why I’m a farmer.

And of course, it doesn’t hurt that a beautiful spring like this also makes incredible summer vegetables – something that also swells my farmer’s soul as I walk the fields. Even after more than two decades of farming, I’m still amazed what a miracle it is that these baby seeds & plants will soon become the incredible bounty of the summer.

Will you join me for it? Our pioneering Summer Veggie CSA – with convenient pickups in SE Portland and at Lake Oswego’s Luscher Farm – starts next week!

Pickups are once a week for 24 weeks, and despite all the care and hand work we shower on our vegetables, the cost is as little as $3.50 a day (or $6.30 a day for a more ample, family-size pickup). In fact, on average, you’d pay 10-20% more for the same veggies at your local natural food store or farmers market. I’m really proud of the value we continue to offer our shareholders.

Getting started is easy: simply sign up before your first pickup – SE Portland, or Lake Oswego’s Luscher Farm. Then, 24 glorious weeks of delicious, local, sustainably farmed produce are yours!

In Your Share (April 16th edition)

Posted by Laura

Hello gorgeous green garlic!! It is such a treat this time of year and doesn’t last long in this truly tender stage. Garlic is planted in the fall, grows roots in the winter, grows shoots in the spring and the fully mature bulbs are harvested just after the 4th of July. While technically edible at any time, we harvest garlic at several distinct stages: green garlic has a straight white shank and tender top, spring garlic has started to form a bulb, but the individual cloves are not separated yet, and fresh & dry storage garlic looks similar to what you see at the store but our varieties are more fresh, flavorful and delish!  All these share the characteristically delightful pungent essence of garlic but each has their distinct charms. You’ll get plenty of green garlic in this last week of winter share. To taste test the other variations on the garlic theme you’ll just have to join us for the upcoming Summer Share Season!!

As you know, we’ve been busy the last few months!! Not only harvesting your winter veggies, but also seeding, transplanting and weeding all of your delicious food for the summer.  All we need now is some LOVE from our members in the form of sign ups : ) The Summer CSA starts mid-May, but early memberships help us get a jump on the season so help us out by signing up TODAY!!

You’ll find recipes for green garlic and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Purple Sprouting Broccoli: Pretty purple heads are tasty and so are the leaves & stems. Roast them whole or chop up and sauté. They also make a fabulous pizza topping!
  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots – yum!
  • Cauliflower: The chef’s we work with have been really enjoying this!! I was inspired by Navarre to roast the little ones whole – greens and all. Check out this photo! Or try this Cauliflower Pasta from Gino’s Restaurant.
  • Collard Greens: These would go really well in the cauliflower & green garlic fritatta in this weeks blogpost from Cook With What You Have.
  • Green Garlic: We plant an early variety, called Early Chinese Pink, in order to have nice plump garlic stalks for you this time of year. The garlic is planted in the fall, grows a vigorous root system through the winter, and pushes up its little green stalks in the spring. We’ll harvest the green garlic for a few months, until the plants start to bulb up and dry down. Similar to leeks – the white part is most tender, but the green tops have good garlic flavor too. Enjoy these little beauties while they last!
  • Leeks: I’m loving the leeks this time of year. Chop and sauté the tender white stem and add them to almost dish that calls for cooked onions. Add the darker tops to soup stock. Or go with a more traditional Potato Leek Soup or make a leek galette.
  • Red Potato: The potatoes are coming full circle! So happy to have these red potatoes for a little bit longer : ) We’ll be planting potatoes for the coming season soon and looking forward to new potatoes early in the Summer Share!
  • Radish Microgreens: These zesty little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Variety Pack of Winter Squash: Tetsu, Oregon Homestead & Sibley maybe a few other kinds too.

Coming soon… Summer Share!