Laura Masterson and Patty at 47th Avenue FarmLet nature set your table with fresh and delicious produce, locally farmed in tune with the seasons. With our CSA – now in its 21st season! – you pick up a bag or more of bounty every week for less than $3.30 a day for a half share, or $5.95 a day to feed a family of four.

Shares are limited and move as fast as pole beans, so reserve your space today. To learn more and sign up, start with our How the Farm Works page, or go straight to the info/order pages for our two pickup sites, SE Portland and Lake Oswego.

Look forward to seeing you on Facebook, on Instagram, and at pick-up!

A delicious summer – our 21st season! – of lovely, responsibly farmed veggies is just around the bend starting mid-May!

Sign up for occasional news from our farm, advance notices on shares and events, special offers, and more!

Getting Oriented

Winter Pick-Up Schedule

47th Ave Farm (SE)
Tuesdays 5-7pm

November 1, 15 & 29
December 13
January 17 & 31
February 14 & 28
March 14 & 28
April 11 & 25

Luscher Farm
Thursdays 5-7pm

November 3 & 17
December 1 & 15
January 19
February 2 & 16
March 2, 16 & 30
April 13 & 27


Southeast
Pick-Up Notes:

We live on a very narrow gravel road, which can easily become congested during pickup. Please take some alternative form of transportation if possible. If you drive, it’s also extremely helpful if you park at least a block away and walk in.

Please bring your own plastic, paper or earth-friendly bags. We can re-use clean cardboard egg cartons.

Ask us about our bucket exchange program if you’d like to bring your compost to the farm.


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FARM NEWS, NOTES AND (AGRI)CULTURE

In Your Share (Aug 14th edition)

Posted by Laura

Sweet Corn Field

The Sweet Corn also really liked that heat wave! Growing corn in the PNW can be challenging sometimes. Early in my farming career we tried quite a few varieties and eventually settled on Sugar Buns and it has performed reliably most seasons. It is what is know in the sweet corn world as a sugary enhanced (se) variety. Developed using traditional breeding techniques, it is sweeter than many old fashioned sweet corn varieties, but not cloyingly sweet like newer Super Sweet types. The newer Super Sweet types also require strict isolation distances otherwise pollen drift can cause their super sweet kernels to get super starchy. More about Sweet Corn Typology here. Sugar Buns has good cold germination – which is helpful in our chilly wet spring weather. In addition, the flavor holds well which means that you can keep it in your fridge for a few days and not have to eat it tonight. Although I’ve been know to snack on it in the field and it is really good that way too!

Amazing recipes for Sweet Corn and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Basil: Lovely bunches of green and purple basil!
  • Sweet Corn: Must be summertime…
  • Cucumbers: We’ll have extra Cukes and Cabbage available for sale in bulk this week! If you want to do some preserving, just let me know. Here is one of my favorite quick pickles – this is my Mom’s recipe for Sweet Refrigerator Pickles.
  • Eggplant: Beautiful Japanese eggplant with a few pink and Italian mixed in.
  • Garlic: Yum! 
  • Lettuce: These lovely and refreshing summer crisp heads make a great summer salad.
  • Summer Squash: Assorted shapes, sizes and colors and they’re all tasty. Grill slabs of zucchini or patty pan on the BBQ or slice them into a gratin or use a big one for Zucchini Bread.
  • Tomatoes: I’m excited about quick roasted tomatoes with garlic and basil : )

Coming soon… Hot Peppers!

Beautiful Corn!

Posted by Laura

All types of corn can be challenging to grow in the Pacific NW. In most regions of the country, corn is direct seeded in the spring. We transplant both sweet corn and popcorn in order to give it a head start in the spring. This is a technique we learned from Josh Volk when he was at Sauvie Island Organics. Transplanting is especially helpful if we have a cold wet spring since most corn seed struggles to germinate when the soil temp is below 60 degrees. This is the reason that most conventional farmers plant treated seed. The corn plants can grow in cool weather, but the seeds need warmth to germinate and thrive. If we plant seeds directly into the cold wet soil they often just rot in the ground. If we plant the seeds in the greenhouse and keep them warm & toasty for a week or two then the small plants are usually strong enough to handle the weather after that. Baby corn plants look like a single blade of grass attached to the seed and have a small fragile root when we transplant them. Less than a week old they’re too small to fend for themselves but older than two weeks they have a larger tap root that can break and that is stressful for the plants. The sweet corn variety we grow is Sugar Buns which we have found to be a good early producer with a nice balance of sweet and old fashioned corn flavor. The variety of popcorn/polenta corn we grow is Amish Butter. Our seed originally came from Anthony Boutard at Ayers Creek Farm and if you are interested in corn then his book, Beautiful Corn: America’s Original Grain from Seed to Plate is a must read! Or check out this video about Anthony & his corn.

In Your Share (Aug 7th edition)

Posted by Laura

The Japanese Eggplant were happy in the heat wave! The plants had lots of lovely lavender flowers a few weeks ago and it appears that almost all of them have been pollinated and grown to maturity. There is something so exotic and beautiful about the shiny dark black purple eggplant. Some of the fruit have cosmetic damage which we think is from the cucumber beetle. These look like yellow ladybugs but they are a terrible plant pest. Both the spotted and striped beetles have been working their way north for the last few years. They nibble on the surface of the young cucumbers and eggplant which creates a superficial scar. The good news is that this is easily peeled off and the rest of the fruit is fine to eat.  The Japanese eggplant are especially easy to grill – just cut in half, brush with olive oil and cook until soft. If you roast some extra eggplant ahead of time you can use it in this Spanish salad – Eggplant in the Moorish Style.

Amazing recipes for Eggplant and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Basil: Lovely bunches of green and purple basil!
  • Cucumbers: We’ll have extra Cukes and Cabbage available for sale in bulk this week! If you want to do some preserving, just let me know. Here is one of my favorite quick pickles – this is my Mom’s recipe for Sweet Refrigerator Pickles.
  • Eggplant: Beautiful Japanese eggplant with a few pink and Italian mixed in.
  • Fava Beans: We always like to have some kind of legume in the share whenever possible. The season usually starts early with sugar snap peas, then transitions to fava beans, then we’ll have green (and purple and yellow and romano) beans later in August and possibly into September. Finally in winter we have a variety of different dried beans. Of all the legumes, fava beans are often the least familiar. It can be alot of work to double shell them in the traditional Italian fashion, but it is so worth it! If you’re pressed for time then chose smaller beans from the bin today and try them on the BBQ or under the broiler using this recipe for Ignacio Matta’s Grilled Fava’s.
  • Sweet Onions: Walla Walla Sweet onions are great in salads or on the grill!
  • Potatoes: New potatoes have thin skins and are tender & tasty. Try them boiled or roasted or make potato salad with the sweet onions.
  • Summerfest Greens: These mild mustard greens are very versatile – tear them raw into salad or chop & quickly sauté them.
  • Summer Squash: Assorted shapes, sizes and colors and they’re all tasty. Grill slabs of zucchini or patty pan on the BBQ or slice them into a gratin or use a big one for Zucchini Bread.

Coming soon… Hot Peppers!

In Your Share (August 1st edition)

Posted by Laura

The Fava Beans are great right now! Not sure if they’ll make it through this HEAT WAVE but we harvested early in the week and early in the morning in order to make sure we got the all the good ones for you. Most legumes we grow – peas, green beans and dry beans – are all vining plants with white flowers similar to a sweet pea. Fava’s are quite distinct in that they are an upright plant with striking black and white flowers. We usually plant them in the fall or early spring, harvest some of those tasty greens while they are in the vegetative phase of growth, then start picking pods as soon as they start to fill with beans. Fava’s are native to North Africa and South Asia, but are now grown through much of the world. They are especially popular in the Middle East, China and South America. Many cultures eat the fresh shelling beans like we do, but often the dried beans are cooked in soup or stew. Some varieties can also be dried and popped like corn nuts. I posted one of my favorite recipes for fresh fava beans below…

Amazing recipes for Fava Beans and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Basil: Lovely bunches of green and purple basil!
  • Cucumbers: We’ll have plenty of Diva green and Silver slicer cucumbers in the share this week. We will also probably have some available for sale in bulk next week. If you want to do some preserving, just let me know. Here is one of my favorite quick pickles – this is my Mom’s recipe for Sweet Refrigerator Pickles.
  • Eggplant: Beautiful Japanese eggplant with a few pink and Italian mixed in.
  • Fava Beans: We always like to have some kind of legume in the share whenever possible. The season usually starts early with sugar snap peas, then transitions to fava beans, then we’ll have green (and purple and yellow and romano) beans later in August and possibly into September. Finally in winter we have a variety of different dried beans. Of all the legumes, fava beans are often the least familiar. It can be alot of work to double shell them in the traditional Italian fashion, but it is so worth it! If you’re pressed for time then chose smaller beans from the bin today and try them on the BBQ or under the broiler using this recipe for Ignacio Matta’s Grilled Fava’s.
  • Garlic: Yum!
  • Summerfest Greens: These mild mustard greens are very versatile – tear them raw into salad or chop & quickly sauté them.
  • Summer Squash: Assorted shapes, sizes and colors and they’re all tasty. Grill slabs of zucchini or patty pan on the BBQ or slice them into a gratin or use a big one for Zucchini Bread.

Coming soon… Walla Walla Sweet Onions!

In Your Share (Week of July 17th)

Posted by Laura

The Sugar Snap Peas are super sweet and crunchy and tasty right now! In a normal year, the harvest would start in early June but since the spring was so wet we had to plant them almost 6 weeks late. I was doubtful they would even produce much since they really do best in cooler weather. But somehow they survived those 100 degree days in June and kept flowering and now have lots of lovely sweet peas : ) Not sure how much longer the harvest will last but we’ve definitely enjoying them for the last few weeks!

We brought in all the garlic of the season over the last two weeks.

All this hot weather has meant lots of time spent setting up and moving irrigation. We used only t-tape on the farm for years and it is super efficient but now we also water a few things with overhead sprinklers. Read my full post about Irrigation on the Farm here.

Amazing recipes for choi and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Summer Cabbage: Lovely little savoy or red cabbage make a single serving size slaw. In the summer I often use this recipe for Roasted Cabbage Wedges since it also makes great cold or room temp leftovers.
  • Fennel: Beautiful bulbs! These have a fresh anise flavor and are really good grated or shaved into salads. The flavor is more mild after cooking. One of my favorite ways to use them is this Soffrito from Cook With What You Have. And last week one of our shareholders recommended this interesting recipe for candied fennel stalks.
  • Garlic: Yum!
  • Kohlrabi: I usually eat these raw. They’re quite good – just peel them and cut into bite sized chunks or make them carrot sized for dipping. They can also be roasted or sautéed or mashed with potatoes or grated into fritters/latkes/okonamiyaki.
  • Lettuce: Beautiful summer crisp blushed with red.
  • Sugar Snap Peas: Yum!
  • Popcorn: Not much explanation needed. If you still have some hot peppers you can grind those up and sprinkle on top for an extra kick.
  • Summer Squash: Assorted shapes, sizes and colors and they’re all tasty. Grill slabs of zucchini or patty pan on the BBQ or slice them into a gratin or use a big one for Zucchini Bread.

Coming soon… Cucumbers & Spring Onions!

Summer Squash Gratin

Posted by Laura


Summer Squash Gratin

Gratin de Courgettes
Based on LuLu’s Provencal Table

3 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon flour
1 cup milk
1 large sweet onion, cut in two from top to bottom and finely sliced
2 lbs small, firm zucchini or other summer squash, quartered lengthwise and cut into 1/2-inch lengths
Salt & freshly ground pepper
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan or Gruyere cheese
Handful of coarsely grated dry breadcrumbs
Optional: 1 Tablespoon dried thyme

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Over low hear, warm half the butter in a heavy casserole, add the onions, and sweat, covered, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon, for about 30 minutes, or until melting, but uncolored. Add the zucchini and salt and cook, first covered, then uncovered, until tender but not falling apart.

Sprinkle the onion and zucchini with flour and stir gently. Raise the heat somewhat and add the milk, a few spoonfuls at a time, stirring until the sauce boils before adding more. Simmer gently for 10 minutes before seasoning with pepper, tasting for salt, and pouring the mixture into a buttered gratin dish.

Mix together the cheese and bread crumbs, sprinkle over the surface, and bake for 20 minutes, or until golden. Serve hot or tepid.

 

In Your Share (Week of July 3rd)

Posted by Laura

Hope everyone has a great 4th of July holiday! We’ll be harvesting on the holiday and will have your veggies ready on the usual schedule. As always, if you can’t make it to get your veggies you can always send a friend or neighbor and if nobody is able to come we’ll donate the produce.

I’m excited about the beautiful choi again this week! I made my favorite Soba Noodle Salad with it today and brought some for the crew. It got rave reviews : )

All this hot weather has meant lots of time spent setting up and moving irrigation. We used only t-tape on the farm for years and it is super efficient but now we also water a few things with overhead sprinklers. Read my full post about Irrigation on the Farm here.

Amazing recipes for choi and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Summer CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Dill: So tasty sprinkled onto scrambled eggs or any kind of salad. It also is a key ingredient in tasty greek yogurt dips like tzatziki.
  • Fennel: Beautiful bulbs! These have a fresh anise flavor and are really good grated or shaved into salads. The flavor is more mild after cooking. One of my favorite ways to use them is this Soffrito from Cook With What You Have. 
  • Spring Garlic: It’s starting to look a little more like a big bulb of storage garlic, but these are still considered “fresh” garlic and should still be stored in the fridge and eaten this week. Storage garlic only stores well after it has fully formed bulbs with individual cloves, then the top of the plant dries down and the wrappers form around the head. Only then is it metabolically prepared to perform the miraculous trick of storing in a cool dry place for up to 9 months without any sign of spoilage. The white part on the bottom that will eventually form the bulb is the most tender. Chop it up and sauté the same way you’d use regular garlic cloves. The upper green part isn’t as tender, but still has great garlic flavor and makes nice soup stock and really good pesto!
  • Hakuri Turnip: More tasty salad turnips this week. Don’t forget to cook the greens too!
  • Joi Choi: Thick ribs in these greens are sweet and crunchy. They are good sautéed or made into slaw. They can be quickly fermented into a tasty kimchi with garlic and any dried hot peppers you still have.
  • Kohlrabi: I usually eat these raw. They’re quite good – just peel them and cut into bite sized chunks or make them carrot sized for dipping into that tasty tzatziki you made with your dill : ) They can also be roasted or sautéed.
  • Lettuce: Beautiful dark red butterhead.
  • Radish Microgreens: These tasty little sprouts are great on top of salads, toasts, soup and roasts. Full size radish greens are tasty and very good for you and these baby greens pack an even bigger nutritional punch.

Coming soon… Sugar Snap Peas! 

Irrigation on the Farm

Posted by Laura

We really appreciate having access to plenty of good clean water to grow our veggies here in the Willamette Valley! This time of year we couldn’t have nearly the beautiful bountiful produce we have without it. When summer comes we spend lots of time setting up and moving irrigation equipment.

When I first started farming we used only drip tape, aka t-tape, on the farm for years. It looks like a strip of flat black tape when it is laid out, but it inflates when filled with water. The emitters regulate the amount of water that is released and the type we use has emitters every 12 inches. It waters exactly where the plant is and doesn’t water all the weeds in the path. When we run it there is very little water loss to wind or evaporation since it just lays on the ground and drips. There are lots of different options for t-tape but we prefer the thicker (10-15ml) tape because it lasts longer. We try and minimize our use of plastic on the farm, and when we do use it we try and chose more durable types and then recycle them when we can’t reuse any longer.

There are also some circumstances where overhead irrigation is very helpful. Some crops really like the humidity created by overhead water. Other crops that are direct seeded close together and cover crops spread across the whole field need overhead water to insure good germination. We use Wade rain 3″ hand lines set 60′ apart with 40′ between sprinklers. It is an old, but elegant system of aluminum pipe and fittings. Wade was originally manufactured nearby so there are lots of used parts available locally. When in good repair (with new gaskets & nozzles) and run properly, overhead water keeps broccoli & cover crops very happy during the summer.

Happy watering!