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In Your Share, July 9th edition

By Laura

Beautiful baby potatoes this week have a delicate thin skin and creamy sweet texture. They’ll make a nice potato salad with the dill or a Salade Niçoise – perfect for these hot days!

You’ll find recipes for potatoes, dill and everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Beautiful Baby Potatoes: These are beautiful and delicate little yellow potatoes. Often called new or creamer potatoes – these are the first potatoes to form on the plant and they have a lovely sweet flavor and creamy texture – perfect for boiling or steaming.
  • Lettuce Heads: So happy to have summer salad!
  • Herbs: Fresh herbs this week will likely be dill or cilantro. Try the dill with new potatoes and cilantro with the Calypso beans. Or check out Cook With What You Have for more recipe ideas!
  • Garlic: I really like this variety, Music, because it has mostly large easy to peel cloves inside big beautiful bulbs. It also has high levels if allicin – an antioxidant common to most garlic. Good for you and tasty too!
  • Summeriest Greens: Beautiful japaneese greens are flavorful but not spicy and can be added to salad or sautéed.
  • Heirloom Dry Beans: We’ll have several varieties available for you to choose from this week. Calypso aka Orca beans have a striking black and white pattern on them but can be used in any recipe that calls for black beans. Jachob’s Cattle bean is a pretty red & white bean that was originally raised by Maine’s Passamaquoddy Indians.
  • Summer Squash: This recipe for Courgette Gratin from Lulu’s Provencal Table is one of my favorites. I’m also fond of adding diced & sautéed summer squash to bean chile, scrambled eggs and quesadillas.
  • Napa (Chinese) Cabbage: Nice dense full size heads! Use it to make a traditional kimchi, sauté it in stir fry, or forget about tradition and try your favorite coleslaw recipe with it : )

 

Coming soon… Green Beans!

In Your Share (July 2nd edition)

By Laura

Hope you have a happy 4th of July!! This holiday has many happy memories for me including good times with family & friends, usually celebrated outdoors, and always with lots of good food. If you want to celebrate with summer salads, the fennel in your share this week adds a nice touch!

You’ll find recipes for fennel and everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Joi Choi: A beautiful and tasty brassica, it is classified as a B. rapa var. chinensis. This species also includes a wide variety of other roots & greens from tatsoi to turnips to napa cabbage. This choi is one of my favorites! It has broad white stems that are mild and crunchy with tender dark green leaves. It makes a terrific addition to stir fry or try this Soba Noodle Salad with Choi.
  • Fennel: Try this Fennel & Salad Turnip Slaw with tacos or sauté chopped bulbs with onions into a tasty cartelized Soffrito.
  • Lettuce Heads: So happy to have summer salad!
  • Mustard Greens: Beautiful purple Dragon’s Tongue greens make a spicy addition to salad and have less heat, but still plenty of flavor when sautéed.
  • Dried Cayenne Peppers: We grow a variety of hot peppers in the summer time, but this is the best one by far for drying. It has a thin skin and the meat of the pepper is flavorful and spicy. You can add a whole one to a pot of soup or stew – or grind it up and make your own DIY Hot Pepper Flakes.
  • Pea Shoot Microgreens: These little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Summer Squash: This recipe for Courgette Gratin from Lulu’s Provencal Table is one of my favorites. I’m also fond of adding diced & sautéed summer squash to bean chile, scrambled eggs and quesadillas.
  • Hakurei Turnips: More tasty salad turnips this week. Don’t forget to cook the greens too!

 

Coming soon… Rainbow Chard!

In Your Share (June 25th edition)

By Laura

It is time for summer squash! Whether you call them courgettes or calabacitas – this much maligned summer vegetable is one of my favorites. Little baby squash can be steamed or sautéed whole. Medium sized squash can be sliced into little rounds and make a lovely summer squash gratin. Larger squash can be grated into tasty zucchini bread. There is quite a bit of diversity in the summer squash family. Dark green zucchini’s are the most common, but we grow Italian striped green zucchini, yellow zucchini, yellow crookneck, & several colors of patty pan squash. Enjoy!

You’ll find recipes for summer squash and everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Napa (Chinese) Cabbage: So excited to see these beautiful dense heads! Use it to make a traditional kimchi, sauté it in stir fry, or try your favorite coleslaw recipe with it.
  • Joi Choi: A beautiful and tasty brassica, it is classified as a B. rapa var. chinensis. This species also includes a wide variety of other roots & greens from tatsoi to turnips to napa cabbage. This choi is one of my favorites! It has broad white stems that are mild and crunchy with tender dark green leaves. It makes a terrific addition to stir fry or try this Soba Noodle Salad with Choi.
  • Kale: This heirloom English flat leaf kale is tender and tasty!
  • Lettuce Heads: So happy to have summer salad!
  • Spring Onions: Enjoy them while they last and don’t forget to use the greens too.
  • Popcorn: The Amish Butter is back! If you love real popcorn with real flavor then you are in for a treat : ) We were first introduced to this variety by Anthony & Carol Boutard at Ayers Creek Farm. The seed is now available from Uprising and it is a surprisingly versatile variety – it can also be ground into polenta, cornbread or made into masa. Pop it on the cob in the microwave (in a brown paper bag, max 3 min) or take the kernels off the cop and pop it any way you choose. Here is my favorite stovetop recipe for popcorn.
  • Spicy Radish Microgreens: These little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Summer Squash: This recipe for Courgette Gratin from Lulu’s Provencal Kitchen is one of my favorites. I’m also fond of adding diced & sautéed summer squash to bean chile, scrambled eggs and quesadillas.
  • Hakurei Turnips: More tasty salad turnips this week. Don’t forget to cook the greens too!

 

Coming soon… Crunchy Cucumbers! 

In Your Share (June 18th edition)

By Laura

The greens are looking good this week! Across the world, cultures use dark leafy greens in a myriad of creative recipes. This week we have at least two continents represented with Joi Choi from Asia & Cimi di Rapa from Europe. These greens may be worlds apart geographically, but botanically they are closely related. As part of the Brassica genus, both likely decendended from the same 3 ancestral species. Included in this genus are important food crops, oilseed crops and also some frustrating weeds. Even just within the food crops there is an incredible amount of diversity as plants have been selected for edible roots, stems, leaves, buds, flowers and seeds. Most of the brassicas are extremely nutritious and often have antioxidant, anticancer and immune enhancing properties.

You’ll find recipes for greens and everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Joi Choi: A beautiful and tasty brassica, it is classified as a B. rapa var. chinensis. This species also includes a wide variety of other roots & greens from tatsoi to turnips to napa cabbage. This choi is one of my favorites! It has broad white stems that are mild and crunchy with tender dark green leaves. It makes a terrific addition to stir fry or try this Soba Noodle Salad with Choi.
  • Fava Beans: Beautiful, early, flavorful and fun! This time of year you don’t have to double peel if you don’t want to. In fact, my favorite way to cook these is whole and in the pod. Try this Fresh Grilled Fava Beans recipe.
  • Baby Lettuce Heads: Let the summer salads begin!
  • Spring Garlic: Lovely plump fresh garlic bulbs for you in the share today. Left in the field, it will become storage garlic – but it isn’t there yet. Use these in any recipe that calls for regular garlic but since they do not have the dried wrapper around the bulb if needs to be stored in the fridge and eaten sooner rather than later.
  • Spring Onions: These are tender and tasty! We call them spring onions to differentiate them from storage onions. This time of year the spring onions have beautiful greens on them which can be used like just like a green onion. You may see red, yellow and white onions – or a mix of all three – in your share this week
  • Sweet Pea Microgreens: These little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Red Round Radish: These are super tasty this time of year. Later in the season they can get pretty spicy, but these just have a little zing to them. Great in salads or as a snack on the crudite plate. Or try this Radish Butter spread.
  • Cimi di Rapa:These greens go by many names aka Sessantina Grossa, Spring Raab, Rabe or Rapini and are classified as B. rapa var. rapa. Common throughout the southern Mediterranean, especially in Italy, Spain and Portugal, they are traditionally boiled or sautéed with olive oil and hot pepper and often served as a side alongside pork or over pasta. My sister worked for a summer in Bari, Italy many years ago and I love this simple pasta – Orecciette with Cimi di Rapa – from that region.

Coming soon… Happy Solstice! 

In Your Share (June 11th, 2018 edition)

By Laura

Let the sugar snap peas begin! We seeded peas early this spring, cultivated them several times with the electric tractor and horses to keep the weeds at bay, then built a sturdy trellis for them. The vines have been climbing vigorously up the trellis and flowering profusely and now we have the first plump ripe pods ready for share this week – yay!

The sugar snap peas we grow have a sweet crunchy edible pod with tasty sweet peas inside. The whole pod and peas are meant to be eaten together. They are usually eaten raw, but can also be steamed or sautéed. Like sweet corn, these peas are best eaten asap otherwise the sugar in the peas will turn starchy over time. Don’t confuse your sugar snap peas (sweet peas, plump sweet pod) with shelling peas (tasty peas, pod is not edible, aka green peas) or snow peas (undeveloped peas, flat pods, often found in asian cuisine). I’m not opposed to the other kinds but sugar snap peas are my favorite and I hope you enjoy them too : )

Last week my friend Walt Bernard from Workhorse Workshops in Dorena, OR delivered my new horse drawn plow! He helped me get it set up and we started plowing up a field with some thick cover crops on it. I’m really looking forward to integrating this tool into the farm fieldwork rotation. I posted some photos of the team in action on the website and on Facebook.

You’ll find recipes everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Baby Lettuce Heads: Let the summer salads begin!
  • Spring Garlic: Lovely plump fresh garlic bulbs for you in the share today. Spring garlic is harvested after the bulbs have formed, but before the cloves are individually wrapped. Left in the field, it will become storage garlic – but it isn’t there yet. Use these in any recipe that calls for regular garlic but since they do not have the dried wrapper around the bulb if needs to be stored in the fridge and eaten sooner rather than later.
  • Spring Onions: These are tender and tasty! We call them spring onions to differentiate them from storage onions. This time of year the spring onions have beautiful greens on them which can be used like just like a green onion. You may see red, yellow and white onions – or a mix of all three – in your share this week
  • Zesty Daikon Microgreens: These little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.
  • Red Round Radish: These are super tasty this time of year. Later in the season they can get pretty spicy, but these just have a little zing to them. Great in salads or as a snack on the crudite plate. Or try this Radish Butter spread.
  • Spinach: This crop likes the cool weather we’ve been having and the leaves are thick, succulent and deeply savoyed. This would make a beautiful spinach salad or can be sautéed.
  • Hakuri Salad Turnips: These look like giant white radish, but the flavor is sweet crunchy and mild. As the name implies, they can definitely be eaten raw or roasted. Greens are good too – cook them up alone or with other greens like spinach.

 

Coming soon… more Sugar Snap Peas! 

 

Avian Biodiversity on Organic Farms

By Laura

Baby killdeer camouflaged in the onion field.

It is widely held belief amongst organic farmers that providing habitat for beneficial insects and diverse bird populations on our farms is a net gain for the wildlife and the farmers. Given the complexity of the ecosystem this can be a difficult hypothesis to test, but the Avian Biodiversity Team is up to the challenge.  For the last several years this team of veterinarians, ornithologists and entomologists from WSU, Cornell & OSU has partnered with organic farmers to better understand the complex and ever-changing ecosystems that we call farms and the preliminary research results are exciting.

This week Olivia Smith, a PhD candidate at WSU surveyed all the birds at our Grand Island Farm and at Luscher Farm and reported back…

“I think you have a few Brewer’s Blackbird nests in the SW corner of the Grand Island Road farm in the old allium patch. They were mobbing me while I was walking back there. I also saw a really adorable Killdeer family at Luscher today.”

At the Grand Island location, she also observed American Robin, Barn Swallow, Brewer’s Blackbird, European Starling, and Killdeer foraging in/above our row crops. She observed quite a few species in the cover crop/pasture areas: American Goldfinch, American Robin, Barn Swallow, Brown-headed Cowbird, Brewer’s Blackbird, European Starling, Killdeer, White-crowned Sparrow, and Cliff Swallow. And she saw two Cedar Waxwings pulling wool off the wire of the pasture fence to build a nest.  At Luscher, there wasn’t as much activity but she saw European Starling, Killdeer, Mourning Dove, and Violet-green Swallow foraging in/above our crop fields.

The Avian Biodiversity Team just got an eOrganic article accepted about Identifying Bird Nests on Farm Structures. And last year they also published a series about beneficial insectivores. The articles are hyperlinked, so you can navigate to 2 others from the first article: https://articles.extension.org/pages/74435/identification-diet-and-management-of-swallows-and-swifts-common-on-organic-farms. In addition, they hosted a webinar in February that may be of interest: http://articles.extension.org/pages/74608/tools-for-farm-biodiversity-webinar.

We really appreciate the great work they are doing to help us better understand the complex web of critters that we share the farm with!

 

In Your Share (May 21, 2018 edition)

By Laura

We are excited to have fava beans in the share so early this season! I had become frustrated with fall planted fava beans in recent years. They can be magnificent – like our current crop – but they can also fail miserably. The timing is challenging and size matters. If the plants are too large in the fall, they will be more susceptible to freezing. If the plants are too small, then they won’t have very many beans in the spring. Three years ago we planted a whole field and had a fabulous stand of fava bean plants – just the right size going into the winter, but despite all the TLC we gave them, the crop froze out completely. Planting the field is alot of work so I vowed not to do that again. But then I accidentally discovered a much easier way to plant in the fall – just till in the spring crop after they set seed! This means we need to weed our spring fava beans a few times after harvest and get the timing right on the tilling – late August or early Sept. But that is a heck of a lot easier then planting by hand!! And I’d need to till the field anyway – so the fact that we get more beans out of the deal is a bonus. And if they die over the winter, I’m sad, but my investment was minimal so we just plant again in the spring. Enjoy these fortuitous fava beans!

We still have a few spots available in the CSA so feel free to let your friends know they can still get in on the bounty with a prorated Summer CSA share share starting next week.

You’ll find recipes everything in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Cauliflower: Beautiful, big heads! I’m excited about Cauliflower Steaks with Green Garlic Aioli. Or try this Cauliflower Pasta from one of our favorite local hangouts in Sellwood – Gino’s Restaurant.
  • Popcorn: Whole cobs are fun to pop in the microwave – just put them in a paper bag, loosely fold the top down, and cook them on high for 2-3min. Warning – 3 min max!! More time in the microwave can set the cob on fire. You can also take the kernels off the cob and use your favorite popping technique.
  • Dried Cayenne Peppers: We grow a variety of hot peppers in the summer time, but this is the best one by far for drying. It has a thin skin and the meat of the pepper is flavorful and spicy. You can add a whole one to a pot of soup or stew – or grind it up and make your own DIY Hot Pepper Flakes.
  • Fava Beans: Beautiful, early, flavorful and fun! This time of year you don’t have to double peel if you don’t want to. In fact, my favorite way to cook these is whole and in the pod. Try this Fresh Grilled Fava Beans recipe.
  • Garlic Whistles aka Scapes: Roasted garlic scapes are SOOOO good! I coat them with olive oil, add salt & pepper and spread a pile of them on a cookie sheet. Set them under the broiler until they start to wilt and caramelize. The BBQ works well too – just be careful they don’t slip through the grill. Makes for fun finger food!
  • Green Garlic: Lovely plump garlic stalks for you in the share today. Green garlic is planted alongside our storage garlic in the fall. It grows a vigorous root system through the winter, and pushes up its little green stalks in the spring. We harvest green garlic now – when the greens are tender and before it has much of a bulb.  Similar to leeks – the white part is most tender, but the green tops have good garlic flavor too. Enjoy these little beauties while they last!
  • Walla Walla Sweet Spring Onions: These are tender and tasty! We call them spring onions to differentiate them from storage onions. This time of year the spring onions have beautiful greens on them which can be used like just like a green onion.
  • Yellow Potato: These yellow Nicola potatoes are great roasted, steamed or boiled.
  • Radish Microgreens: These zesty little treats make a nice topping for soups, salad or sandwiches.

 

Coming soon… Hakurei Turnip and Round Red Radish! 

 

Our summer CSA comes with a chef!

By Laura

Katherine DeumlingOne of the things people love about our CSA is eating in tune with the seasons. We meticulously research varietals that thrive in our climate, and plant and harvest them when they want to be planted and harvested. We work for nature, not the other way around!

That gives each pickup a wonderful sense of discovery, but that’s only half the fun: then you get to eat what you bring home!

That’s why every 47th Avenue Farm share comes with members-only access to Cook With What You Have, an amazing online resource curated by local chef and food activist Katherine Deumling that’s packed with great recipes – and even better, specifically tuned to what’s in your CSA pickup each week.

Give it a try yourself, for free. Katherine’s unlocked two easy recipes featuring cauliflower and green garlic, two (of many) veggies our shareholders can look forward to among the first pickups.
Give them a try!

Yum. Katherine says, “I’ve been collaborating with Laura for seven years, and I love how farms like hers bring so much beautiful, nutritious and delicious food to our tables. And knowing what to do with that fresh produce is a big part of a healthy and vibrant community and planet. You don’t need fancy tools or ingredients to nourish yourself and your loved ones everyday.”

Shareholders tell me they’ve gone for stretches where they just choose a veggie from our share, pull up her site, and just randomly pick any recipe she’s got for it. They’ve never been disappointed. It’s like having a personal CSA chef consultant!

I’d like to share it with you. Our pioneering Summer Veggie CSA – with two pickups in SE Portland and Lake Oswego’s Luscher Farm – starts today, on May 15th. Join us!