Laura Masterson and Patty at 47th Avenue FarmLet nature set your table with fresh and delicious produce, locally farmed in tune with the seasons. With our CSA – now in its 21st season! – you pick up a bag or more of bounty every week for less than $3.50 a day for a half share, or $6.30 a day to feed a family of four.

Shares are limited and move as fast as pole beans, so reserve your space today. To learn more and sign up, start with our How the Farm Works page, or go straight to the info/order pages for our two pickup sites, SE Portland and Lake Oswego.

Look forward to seeing you on Facebook, on Instagram, and at pick-up!

An amazing summer – our 22nd season! – of delicious, responsibly farmed produce is happening soon – sign up today!

Sign up for occasional news from our farm, advance notices on shares and events, special offers, and more!

Getting Oriented

Summer Pick-Up Schedule

47th Ave Farm (SE)
Every week on
Tuesdays 5-7pm,
May 15th – Oct 23rd, 2018

Luscher Farm
Every week on
Thursdays 5-7pm,
May 17th – Oct 25th, 2018

Get signed up today!


 

Southeast
Pick-Up Notes:

We live on a very narrow gravel road, which can easily become congested during pickup. Please take some alternative form of transportation if possible. If you drive, it’s also extremely helpful if you park at least a block away and walk in.

Please bring your own plastic, paper or earth-friendly bags.

Ask us about our bucket exchange program if you’d like to bring your compost to the farm.


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FARM NEWS, NOTES AND (AGRI)CULTURE

In Your Share (March 19th, 2018 edition)

Posted by Laura

What a treat to have such beautiful spinach!! We grow some specially adapted varieties for this winter & early spring season. This one is called Winter Giant and the leaves truly can grow to be huge. We’ve picked them at a more manageable size for you to enjoy in salads or sautéed. Always tender and tasty – we hope you like it as much as we do!

You’ll find recipes for spinach and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you’re a CSA member, you will find your password in your most recent email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Purple Sprouting Broccoli: Pretty purple heads are tasty and so are the leaves & stems. Roast them whole or chop up and sauté.
  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots – yum!
  • Collard Greens: The workhorse of the winter – enjoy them while they last.
  • Yellow Onions: Most of my meals start with sautéed onions, then a world of possibilities opens up…
  • Yellow Potatoes: This beautiful yellow Nicola is one of our most reliable & tasty potatoes.
  • Black Radish: I did not grow up with this vegetable, but have come to love it! Long considered to have many traditional health benefits, new research is showing this to be true. And nice that it is tasty too : ) My favorite recipes are… mashed with potatoes, grated into slaw, roasted in thin slices/coins. And you’ll find more than a dozen ideas & recipes at Cook With What You Have.
  • Red Shallots: These are lovely in a traditional french vinaigrette and make awesome Crispy Fried Shallots to sprinkle on top of Pho (or anything else for that matter : )
  • Spinach: Beautiful bunches!
  • Variety Pack of Winter Squash: Butternut & Winter Sweet & maybe a few other kinds too.

Coming soon… Summer Share!

 

A boring winter report

Posted by Laura

The horses like to play in the snow but I’m glad that, compared to last year, this has been a boring winter. And if that’s the standard, give me boring every year!

As you may remember with the same shiver I do, last winter featured snow that wouldn’t go away, rain (and mud) well into the spring, and a lot of brrrrrrrrrrr!

In fact, we couldn’t even get onto the fields until April last year, setting our planting and harvesting schedules back. Or more accurately, we couldn’t start working the fields responsibly: laying a heavy tractor on muddy fields compacts the soil, squeezing out the oxygen that micro-organisms need to feed the plant and that plants need for a healthy immune systems. You can’t have healthy produce without healthy soil, so despite the delays it would cause, we knew we’d want to wait out the mud and do things right. I’m glad we did, but it sure made us long for typical Oregon winters!

Like this year, which by comparison, has been mild and relatively dry. Yes, we had a little snow a last month, and for sure, the low snow pack may come back to haunt Oregon agriculture later, but for now, it makes harvesting easier – and we’re already out there planting for summer!

In Your Share (March 5th, 2018 edition)

Posted by Laura

Love these leeks!! They have long tender white shanks and the darker green tops have great flavor too.  I usually chop and sauté the lower half in butter or olive oil as soon as I get them home. Once they are cooked and cooled then often they go straight into the fridge – ready for any number of quick week-day recipes.  The tops need to be cooked longer or just add them to soup stock. You’ll find recipes for leek, and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots – yum!
  • Baby Cabbage: My favorite recipe for these is Roasted Wedges – so easy & so good!
  • Chard: This is definitely not a salad green, but is is one of the most tender cooking greens. If you’re making something that calls for cooked spinach, you can always substitute sautéed chard. It’s really good in frittata, lasagne and my Grandmother’s Bisque.
  • Collard Raab: Like broccolini except better!
  • Leeks: These lovely Liege Giant Winter leeks from Adaptive Seeds are terrific this time of year. When chopped and sautéed they add a sweet rich onion-like flavor to any number of dishes. I substitute them for onions in everything this time of year. Or you can make something special like this Potato Leek Soup.
  • Onions: This easy to make red onion quick pickle will brighten up your winter salads or sandwich.
  • Red Potatoes: One of our most reliable & tasty potatoes – Desiree has pretty red skin, golden flesh and creamy texture, it’s great tasty roasted alone or with other root crops. Would also be perfect in Potato Leek Soup.
  • Radish Microgreens: So happy to have these spicy little gem’s back. Sprinkle a bit of zing on your salad or sandwich.
  • Spinach: Beautiful bunches!
  • Winter Squash, Butternut & Winter sweet: These are easy & sweet!

Coming soon… Overwintering Cauliflower!

 

Winter squash in the spring? Yes!

Posted by Sobin Hiraoka

Most people associate winter squash with, well, winter, so by the time February or March rolls around, it’s as far in the rear view mirror as Halloween and pumpkin pie. Plus, most varieties are huge, great for the big feasts of autumn but not for lighter spring meals.

But still, the warm, comforting flavor of squash and what it can add to recipes year-round doesn’t change, so we began casting around for varieties that tasted great, stored well, and didn’t cast the shadow across the landscape that their larger cousins did.

And I’m happy to say we found some! Tetsukabuto and Winter Sweet are delicious and juuuuuust right in size. We planted them in the summer, harvest them in the fall and then store them for a bit – squashes continue to ripen when stored properly (as we do, of course!) – and now they’re at their peak of flavor and great eating.

By the way, you won’t see either of these varieties in stores – only in your CSA shares! – so enjoy the extra taste of eating something unique and local, in addition to delicious!

(for more, visit the excellent Eat Winter Squash website)

In Your Share (Jan 22nd 2018 edition)

Posted by Laura

Love these winter carrots!! If you don’t eat them all on the way home, you’ll find recipes for these, and everything else in your share, at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

If you are not yet a member, it is easy to sign up for a pro-rated Winter Spring CSA Share online. And you’ll get one of our big sturdy organic cotton tote bags if you sign up in January!!

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots – yum!
  • Brussel Sprouts: My three favorite ways to cook sprouts are… 1) drizzle with salt & olive oil and roast in the oven until they have crispy carmelized edges 2) shred for salad and 3) boiled with gnocchi and doused with pesto in this one pot wonder.
  • Fennel Bulbs: These have a stronger flavor when used raw and are really good shaved into salad. They are especially tasty combined with citrus which is of course not in your share, but it is currently in season one state south : ) One of my favorite recipes is this Fennel & Onions Soffrito. And if you need more inspiration there are over two dozen recipes at Cook With What You Have.
  • Black Tuscan Kale: This is so good right now! This raw kale salad is my favorite healthy winter comfort food.
  • Leeks: These lovely King Richard leeks have beautiful long white shanks. When chopped and sautéed they add a sweet rich onion-like flavor to any number of dishes. I substitute them for onions in everything this time of year. Or you can make something special like this Potato Leek Soup.
  • Onions: This easy to make red onion quick pickle will brighten up your winter salads or sandwich.
  • Potatoes: This yellow variety, Nicola,  is tasty roasted alone or with other root crops. Would also be perfect in Potato Leek Soup.
  • Rutabaga: This gnarly looking root vegetable is believed to be the result of a long ago cross between a turnip and a cabbage. Botanically the turnip & rutabaga are distinctly different – more on that here. In the kitchen, these two related species are often used interchangeably.  After peeling the outer layer off try it roasted, mashed, or in slaw. You’ll find more about rutabaga history and the varieties we grow here.
  • Winter Squash, Delicata & Gills Golden Pippin: These are easy & sweet!

Coming soon… Red Shallots!

 

In Your Share (Jan 8, 2018 edition)

Posted by Laura

Happy New Year!! We are pleased to ring in the first share of 2018 with lots of fresh healthy veggies including this beautiful Variegata di Chioggio radicchio!! Over the years we have grown many kinds of radicchio and it has often been a challenging crop for us. Sometimes we didn’t get high quality seeds, other times the varieties were just not well adapted to our climate or maybe didn’t have the right planting dates or field conditions. Suffice it to say we are very happy with this particular radicchio (thank you Adaptive Seeds) and definitely plan to grow it again next year!! It is incredibly beautiful, very productive and super tasty. It has a nice balance of bitter and sweet. The bitter flavors are stronger when raw so if you like that use it in salad with a bold flavored dressing. To tone down the bitter and bolster the sweetness shred the leaves, soak them in ice water for 30 min or more, then cook the greens. There are several recipe tips below and you’ll find even more amazing recipes for radicchio and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

If you are not yet a member, it is easy to sign up for a pro-rated Winter Spring CSA Share online. And you’ll get one of our big sturdy organic cotton tote bags if you sign up in January!!

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots – yum!
  • Collards: Gotta love those greens!
  • Garlic: I usually sauté garlic with onions as the base for any number of culinary adventures. This week I made a nice garlic aioli which was tasty with roasted root veggies and makes a nice base for creamy salad dressing. Yum!
  • Kohlrabi: Peel, cut into apple slice wedges and take it with you for a snack. Sweet enough to eat by itself and also tasty with humus or dips. Or try one of the 2 dozen recipes at Cook With What You Have.
  • Onions: Yellow storage onions this week.
  • Potatoes: This red variety is tasty roasted alone or with other root crops.
  • Radicchio, Variegata di Chioggia: This beautiful radicchio is no wall flower – it is a nice combo of bitter and sweet flavors. The radicchio’s bitterness is due to intybin, which stimulates the appetite and digestive system, and acts as a tonic for the blood and liver. You can temper radicchio’s bitter edge by soaking it in ice water or cooking it or serving it with sour things (vinegar, citrus juice, sour cream, salami), salty things (salt, olives, capers), or fatty things (oils, butter, cheeses, bacon) since all these methods help reduce the bitter compounds. If you want to highlight radicchio’s bright and bitter flavor try it with sweet (sugar, fruits, jams) or pungent (mustard, anchovies, blue cheese, black pepper) foods.
  • Black Radish: The dark leathery skin of this radish is part of what makes it a terrific winter vegetable – this rough & tough skin protects it from the vagaries of the weather & keeps nibbling field mice at bay. This vegetable was first cultivated in the eastern Mediterranean has since been used in Indian, Egyptian & Chinese cuisine and in a variety of health tonics. Definitely peel this one, then try it roasted, mashed, or in slaw.
  • Rutabaga: This gnarly looking root vegetable is believed to be the result of a long ago cross between a turnip and a cabbage. Botanically the turnip & rutabaga are distinctly different – more on that here. In the kitchen, these two related species are often used interchangeably.  After peeling the outer layer off try it roasted, mashed, or in slaw.
  • Winter Squash, Mariana di Chioggia: This squash is from Chioggia (pronounced kee-OH-gee-uh) one of the most famous vegetable growing regions in Italy. Our favorite radicchio (see above) and one of our best summer beets also hail from this town near Venice.  The squash has a characteristic bumpy exterior that starts out greenish-grey in color & ripens to orange in storage. It supposedly earned the nickname of Zucca Barucca, or pumpkin with warts. Although there is an alternative story that links it to the Hebrew word baruch which translates to Holy Squash. Take your pick of translations, in some ways they are both true – warty on the outside and divine flavor on the inside. The sweet brilliant orange flesh is traditionally used for pasta fillings (such as tortelli or cappellacci) but it also makes a tasty roasted squash.

Coming soon… Lovely Leeks!

 

Rutabaga demystified!

Posted by Laura

From Shareholder Sobin Hiraoka

What is is this strange looking root? If you are of Scottish origin, tatties and neeps should be familiar to you.  Tatties are known as potatoes to the rest of us, and neeps is referred to as Swede, Swedish turnip, or rutabaga.

Rutabaga, “Brassica Napus,” was first found growing wild in the hinterlands of Sweden in the early 1600s but there seems to be a debate as to its origin, with some claiming Russia as the birthplace of this root.  In any case, it’s widely used in northern Europe by the Finns, Swedes, Norwegians, Dutch, English, and Welsh.  The root can be prepared similarly to potatoes and the leaves like spinach or chard.  Rutabaga has high levels of potassium, magnesium, calcium, zinc, and vitamins C, K, and B.

As part of our winter CSA, you can expect to see one of two varieties in your share – either “Gilfeather” or “Joan”.

Gilfeather rutabaga was cultivated in Vermont by John Gilfeather in the late 1800s, and he referred to his creation as a “turnip” to conceal its true identity, going so far as to cut off the tops and rootlets before distributing his prized vegetable so that it couldn’t be propagated.  Gilfeather is an egg shaped, white fleshed (vs more common yellow), mild flavored variety that is sweet and tender.  Due to these great qualities, this heirloom was added to Slow Food USA’s Ark of Taste and is listed as “Gilfeather Turnip”.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with Slow Food, it’s a global movement whose main premise is “food that is good, clean, and fair for all,” an antidote against industrial agriculture.  Our farmer, Laura, was invited to attend Terra Madre in 2006, which is Slow Food’s international gathering of leaders, supporters, and small scale farmers and producers held in Turin, Italy.  In support of their mission, Slow Food created the Ark of Taste, which they describe as a “living catalog of delicious and distinctive foods facing extinction.”

“Joan” is the other cultivar that we grow, and it’s mentioned as a refined version of the “American Purple Top” variety, but with a more uniform and round root.  The flesh is yellow, typical of rutabagas, and the taste has a pleasant sweetness to it.

Katherine Deumling at Cook With What You Have has been testing rutabaga recipes for years  and the result is a cache of amazing recipes.  She notes that rutabaga does well in soups, curries, & stews. Be careful when roasting as this can sometimes increase the bitter flavors.  Nutmeg, rosemary, and thyme are good herbs that pair well with this root.  She has 15 great recipes that use rutabagas in mashes, hashes, soups, slaws, salads, gratins, and curries.  Bon appetit!

 

In Your Share (Dec 11th edition)

Posted by Laura

We’ve had quite a few frosty days on the farm lately! Cold temperatures can be challenging for the harvest crew, but as long as the low’s stay in the 20’s or above most of our winter crops will do just fine. In fact many crops, like the sugarloaf chicory in the photo, will get sweeter with the cold weather. How does this work? The biochemistry of plants and many years of winter variety trials on the farm both work together to bring you some of the best tasting veggies in town! I explain some of my tips and tricks for winter farming in the post I wrote last year when it was even colder and snowing. You’ll find amazing recipes for chicory and everything else in your share are available to members at Cook With What You Have. If you joined our Winter CSA you will find your password in the member email. Enjoy 24/7 access to recipe inspiration!

Let your friends know that they can still get in on the CSA. It’s easy to sign up for a pro-rated Winter Spring CSA Share online!

This week your share may include…

  • Brussel Sprouts: Tasty sprouts are still on the stalks. Remove the sprouts, trim off a few leaves, then they are ready for roasting or slaw.  
  • Carrots: Sweet winter carrots – yum!
  • Cauliflower: This is the first time we’ve been able to offer cauliflower in December! We had a bumper crop of fall cauliflower and we have extended the season by harvesting the heads before the frost set in and storing them in the walk-in. I’m looking forward to cauliflower steaks and curried cauliflower soup : )
  • Celery Root/Celeriac: is a cousin to the more familiar celery plant and has a similar flavor but distinctly different texture. I love it in vegetable soup or hardier stews and one of my favorite winter salads is this Remoulade from David Lebovitz. Or check out any of the two dozen recipes for celeriac at Cook With What You Have.
  • Sugarloaf Borca Chicory: Another great winter green! These long loose romaine type heads have a pleasing balance of sweet and bitter flavors. I love them in salads where they provide a nice complement to stronger flavors like capers & lemon, or blue cheese & balsamic vinegar. Also known as Pan di Zucchero in Italy, and Zukerhut in Germany, they are traditionally grilled or sautéed. Cooking reduces the bitterness and adds complex carmelized flavors. You’ll find almost 3 dozen recipe ideas for chicory at CookWithWhatYouHave.
  • Garlic: I usually sauté garlic with onions as the base for any number of culinary adventures. I’ve been really enjoying a little raw garlic in my kale salads and I’ve also been roasting whole peeled cloves with some of the root veggies. Yum!
  • Black Tuscan Kale: There are many variations on the winter kale salad theme, but this recipe was the gateway for me and it is still one of my favorites.
  • Onions: Italian cippolini (pronounced chip-oh-lee-knee) are sweet and mild. The baby onions are most common at the store, but we grew some BIG ones this year. They make amazing carmelized onions and are also good cut into chunks and roasted with root veggies.
  • Potatoes: This yellow variety is tasty roasted alone or with other root crops.
  • Purple Top Turnip: These are a great addition to roasted root veggies – especially with carrots & potatoes. Cut everything into similar sized chunks, mix with olive oil, spread onto a baking sheet and add seasonings. Salt, pepper, rosemary, oregano & thyme are all classic flavors that combine well with roasted root veggies. Turnips also make a nice winter mash with or without potatoes and/or cauliflower.
  • Delicata Squash & Pie Pumpkins: I love pumpkin pie for the holidays! My favorite recipe is still my grandmothers. When I first grew pie pumpkins almost 20 years ago, this recipe was the only one I could find that actually called for fresh cooked pumpkins rather than canned. These days there are lots of versions out there. This is my sister’s favorite recipe which is lactose free and uses coconut milk. Can’t have too many pies – they all disappear quickly when my family gets together this time of year : )

 

Coming soon… Happy Holidays!