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Archived posts for the ‘Peppers’ Category

Momofuku’s Roasted Brussel Sprouts

By Laura

Momofuku’s Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Fish Sauce Vinaigrette
Adapted from David Chang

2 tablespoons very thinly sliced cilantro stems, plus 1/2 cup leaves
3 tablespoons chopped mint
2 pounds brussels sprouts (smaller ones are better)
Grapeseed or other neutral oil as needed, as needed (lots for frying, little for roasting)
1/2 cup fish sauce (adjust to taste — some fish sauce brands are saltier)
1/4 cup water
2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
Juice of 1 lime
1/4 cup sugar
1 garlic clove, minced
1 to 3 red cayenne peppers, rehydrated & thinly sliced, seeds intact

Combine the vinaigrette (below), cilantro stems, and mint in a bowl, and set aside.

Peel away any loose or discolored outer leaves, trim the dry end of the stems with a knife, and cut the sprouts in half. Cut any especially large ones in quarters. Do not wash, especially if frying the sprouts. If roasting, and you must, dry very well.

Options for cooking sprouts:

  • To roast the brussels sprouts: Heat the oven to 400 degrees F. Heat 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil (or just enough to evenly coat the bottom of the pan) in 2 oven-safe wide skillets (12 to 14 inches) over medium heat. When the oil slides easily from side to side of the pan, add the brussels sprouts cut side down. When the cut faces of the sprouts begin to brown, transfer the pan to the oven to finish cooking, about 15 minutes. Alternately, if you don’t have 2 large skillets or are cooking more sprouts for a larger crowd, roast them in the oven: toss them with 1 tablespoon of oil per pound and spread them on a baking sheet, cut sides down. Roast in the oven, checking for browning every 10-15 minutes, tossing them around with a spatula only once they start to brown nicely.The sprouts are ready when they are tender but not soft, with nice, dark brown color.
  • To fry the brussels sprouts: Heat 11/2 inches of oil in a deep saucepan over medium-high heat until a deep-fry or instant-read thermometer registers 375°F. Line a plate with paper towels. Fry in batches that don’t crowd the pan — be careful, these will pop and spatter. Brussels sprouts will take about 5 minutes: when the outer leaves begin to hint at going black around the edges—i.e., after the sprouts have sizzled, shrunk, popped, and browned but before they burn—remove them to a paper towel–lined plate or tray.

Serve warm or at room temperature. When ready to serve, divide the brussels sprouts among four bowls (or serve it all out of one big bowl), top with the dressing (below) to taste and cilantro leaves, and toss once or twice to coat.

Dressing: Combine the fish sauce, water, vinegar, lime juice, sugar, garlic, and chiles in a jar. Taste; If too salty, add more water and/or lime juice. This vinaigrette will keep for up to a week in the refrigerator.

The End of the Season Harvest: Tomatoes & Peppers…

By Laura

The rains have arrived and I’ve had several people ask me about harvesting this time of year. Hopefully you’ve already picked most your red tomatoes! The rain will definitely cause tomatoes to split and they aren’t as flavorful after being rained on either. If you have them under cover, then you might be able to pick for another week or so but wait until the sun comes out again if you can. On the farm we usually try to wait for a dry day to pick green tomatoes as well. It is important pick these before the late blight attacks the fruit, and definitely before the frost comes. We’ll have lots of green tomato recipes in the website next week, but in the meantime try these from the NY Times.

We’re hoping for another week or so of mild weather to keep ripening sweet peppers. The slugs are beginning to attack the fruit so this week we’ll probably harvest everything that is close to the ground. Before the first frost make sure you pull all the rest of the fruit off, wash it, and then you can store them in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. If you’re swimming in peppers this time of year like we are try this recipe for Marinated Red Peppers from Kelly Meyers blog Front Burner on Culinate. I think it works just as well with yellow and green peppers too.

We also grow several varieties of hot peppers and dry extras to give out during the winter share. Usually the cayenne and habeneros start to ripen sometime in September. We’ll check the plants about once a week and bring any fully ripe fruit inside to dry. Before the first frost we’ll pick all the remaining hot peppers that have started to blush with color and bring them inside to dry. Most of them will slowly add more color during the drying process. Fully dry peppers can be stored in airtight containers or frozen.

Fresh Corn with Cherry Tomatoes

By dcculpepper

About two cups of fresh corn cut off the cob

¼ cup (4 tablespoons) minced shallots or onion

About a pint of cherry tomatoes, whole

A few tablespoons of cooking oil

Salt and herbs to taste (Bittman’s recipe calls for tarragon; I used herbs de Provence; use your favorite.)


Sauté shallots or onions in oil about a minute

Add corn and tomatoes and continue to sauté over fairly high heat for about 5 minutes, stirring or shaking frequently

Season and serve



I haven’t tried this yet, but grill corn on the cob first and then cut corn off the cob and proceed as above.

Consider adding small amount of red pepper flakes or minced chiles

Salsa Verde with Parsley

By Laura

In “A Passion for Piedmont,” Matt Kramer uses a similar salsa verde for a wonderful anchovy appetizer.  However, the sauce is wonderful on its own with tomatoes, eggs, pasta, or whatever. – David Culpepper


1 small bunch of Italian (flat leaf) parsley, stems removed

2 to 4 cloves of garlic

6 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

¼ teaspoon to a full teaspoon red pepper flakes


Mince (do not puree) parsley and garlic in food processor

Add oil, vinegar, and pepper flakes and process a few seconds to combine.

Raw Tuscan Kale Salad With Pecorino

By dcculpepper

From Shareholder David Culpepper

    1 bunch Tuscan kale (also known as black or lacinato kale or in Italian Cavalo Nero
    1 thin slice country bread, or 1/4 cup homemade bread crumbs (coarse)
    1/2 to 2 garlic cloves, finely minced
    1/4 cup finely grated pecorino cheese, more for garnish
    3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil (use your best), more for garnish
    Freshly squeezed juice of 1 lemon [optional – add some lemon zest]
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes (homemade of course – finely chop or grind up those dried cayenne peppers)
    Freshly ground black pepper, to taste.

1. Trim bottom 2 inches off kale stems and discard. Slice kale, including ribs, into 3/4-inch-wide ribbons (optional – first slice out the stems). You should have 4 to 5 cups. Place kale in a large bowl.
2. If using bread, toast it until golden on both sides. Tear it into small pieces and grind in a food processor until mixture forms coarse crumbs.
3. Transfer garlic to a small bowl. Add 1/4 cup cheese, 3 tablespoons oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper flakes and black pepper, and whisk to combine. Pour dressing over kale and toss very well to thoroughly combine (dressing will be thick and need lots of tossing to coat leaves).
4. Let salad sit for 15 minutes [longer sit doesn’t hurt it], then serve topped with bread crumbs, additional cheese and a drizzle of oil.

Yield: 2 to 4 servings.
Time: 20 minutes

Los Chiles Relleno

By Laura

Based on a recipe from Mariquita Farm

    8 anaheim or poblano chiles
    8 pieces of a good melting cheese
    1.5-2 pound ripe tomatoes
    4 garlic cloves, skinned
    1 onion, skinned, quartered
    Salt and pepper to taste
    4 eggs, separated

Wash & lightly dry 8 chiles that are about the size of your fist or a bit larger. Put them whole under the broiler and roast, turning with tongs, until wrinkled & dark, but not burnt on most sides. Remove from oven and place in paper bag for 5 minutes. Take them out of the bag & skin them, trying to leave them whole as best you can, then let them cool down.

Tomato sauce: Chop & seed the tomatoes. Saute garlic & onions until soft. Add tomatoes and simmer until it is thick. Taste for salt & pepper.

Slit each chile with a small whole, then attempt to remove some of the seeds, keeping the chile whole if possible. Stuff the roasted chiles with the cheese pieces. Don’t worry if some of your peppers aren’t completely whole, I just wrapped the frayed pieces around the cheese, and you couldn’t tell those chiles from the truly intact ones once they were on the plate.

With the roasted chiles and tomato sauce ready, you can start on the egg whites. Whip egg whites & 2 tablespoons flour until soft peaks are becoming a bit stiffer. Fold in 2 of the egg yolks (you can do as you please with the other two, you won’t need them for this recipe) with a rubber spatula, taking care not to disturb the egg white mass more than necessary.

Dredge stuffed chiles in flour (I put about 1/2 a cup in a saucer for this task), then thoroughly coat with the egg white stuff. Fry in hot oil until golden brown, turning at least once to cook all sides. Serve immediately with a couple of spoons of tomato sauce served over the relleno. Divine!!

Anaheim Chile & Corn Chowder

By Laura
    1-2/3 cups fresh or frozen corn kernels
    3/4 lime, zest and juice
    1 tablespoon plus 2 tsp. corn oil
    3/4 large yellow onion, peeled and minced
    3-1/4 cups chicken stock, preferably homemade
    1-2/3 cups russet potatoes, peeled, diced
    3/4 teaspoon chili powder
    1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
    3/4 Anaheim or other mild green chile pepper, stem and pith removed, seeded and chopped
    3/4 red bell pepper, stem and pith removed, seeded and chopped
    2/3 cup plus 2 Tbs. heavy cream
    1/3 cup plus 1 Tbs. fresh cilantro, chopped
    4 sprigs cilantro or parsley, for garnish
    1/2 teaspoon. Kosher salt
    1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon salsa, for garnish

In a mixing bowl, squeeze lime juice over corn and mix in zest with a spoon. Set aside. In a large saucepan over medium heat, cook oil and onion until the onion is translucent and softened. Add stock, potato, chili powder, red pepper flakes, and cumin and bring to a boil. Turn heat down to medium low, cover, and cook until potatoes are just soft. Add Anaheim and red bell pepper and cook another 5-6 minutes, uncovered until potatoes are very soft. Add corn and cream, and continue to cook uncovered, until soup thickens. Add cilantro and simmer a few more minutes. Taste to correct seasoning with salt if necessary.

To serve: Ladle into warmed bowls, garnish with a cilantro sprig and a dollop of salsa on each serving, and serve immediately.