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In Your Share ( May 14th edition)

By Laura

Welcome to the first Summer Share of the season!!

Everything has been growing fast on the farm with all this SUNSHINE! We rolled the sides on on the high tunnels to keep things from overheating inside. Outside we have been seeding, weeding and watering as fast as we can!!

You can download Recipe Packet for this week’s share HERE. These are written by my friend Katherine Deumling at Cook With What You Have. I’m definitely going to try one of the leek recipes from the packet when I make lunch for the farm crew this week!

We still have a few SUMMER SHARES for sale!! You can learn more HERE and shoot me an email to get started.

This week your share may include…

  • Cauliflower: These are our “winter” cauliflower but they are still producing a few heads even with the “summer” weather we’ve been having! I’m making cauliflower curry pizza for the crew tomorrow. Sounds a bit unusual, but it is always a big hit!  I saute red onion (or leeks) then add cauliflower and curry powder. Next, lay out the pizza dough, brush it with olive oil, add the cauliflower topping, put some mozzarella on top and bake. Simple and tasty!
  • Chard: The chard is more tender than many greens and doesn’t always make it through the winter, but this year happily it did! Try it in the Daddy Patties from your recipe packet or make my grandmothers Chard Bisque.
  • Leeks: These King Richard leeks are wonderful – just saute the tender stems with some greens – for a simple side dish.
  • Parsley: This time of year parsley, a biennial, starts to flower so you may see some of the buds in your bunches. Use the leaves in some of Katherine’s recipes and the stems buds to add a nice flavor to soup stock.
  • Dried Sweet Peppers: These look like a hot pepper, but the are in fact quite sweet. Use them as you would
  • Popcorn: We love this Early Pink variety! If you have a microwave you can put the whole cob in a brown paper bag and microwave it 1 min at a time for up to 3min. Most of the kernals will be popped off at that point so pour it in a bowl with some butter and salt & yum! BE CAREFUL – more than 4 consecutive minutes in the microwave  can cause the cobs to catch on fire!! Otherwise, take the kernals off the cob and make perfect popcorn the old fashioned way. 1 cob makes about 2 cups when it is popped.
  • Spinach: These giant leaves are incredibly tender & sweet!
  • Turnips: Not your grandmothers turnip – these are pure white, crunchy, mild japanese salad turnips. The variety is Hakuri and the greens are tasty too!

Coming soon… cherry tomato plants & beautiful little lettuce heads!

In Your Share (April 16th edition)

By Laura

We still have a few SUMMER SHARES for sale!! You can sign up & get more info HERE.

This week is the last share of the winter season and what a season it has been! Despite snow, record rains & floods we had bountiful baskets of veggies all winter. We’ll miss the sweet carrots and great greens, but we’re looking forward to SUNSHINE and the summer share : )

You can download your Recipe Packet HERE.  These are written by my friend Katherine Deumling at Cook With What You Have. I’m definitely going to try one of the leek recipes from the packet when I make lunch for the farm crew this week!

This week your share may include…

  • Beets: A few weeks ago I was in Mt Vernon, WA to present at a workshop on winter farming. I made sure to tell everyone about these Winterkeeper beets!! They are easy to grow and maintain their quality through the winter better than any other variety we’ve ever grown.
  • Cauliflower: These are some of best cauliflower ever! We plant special varieties mid-summer, watch them grow slowly through the fall & winter, then marvel as they explode with perfect beautiful heads this time of year. This is one of my favorite Cauliflower pasta recipes from our friends at Gino’s Restaurant in Sellwood.
  • Chard: The chard is more tender than many greens and doesn’t always make it through the winter, but this year happily it did! With the longer days and a bit of sunshine it has started to regrow. The leaves are small, but come in a rainbow of beautiful colors. Try it in the Farçous from your recipe packet or make my grandmothers Chard Bisque.
  • Collards: The leaves are smaller this time of year as they start to grow again in the spring sunshine but they’re still sweet, tender and tasty.
  • Leeks: These King Richard leeks make a wonderful potato leek soup or just saute the tender stems with some greens – winter comfort food!
  • Parsley: Cute little bunches! Try this yummy Roasted Cauliflower with Lemons, Capers & Parsley Recipe from an article about the farm a few years ago in Mix Magazine.
  • Parsnips: If you’re a parsnip fan like I am you’ll enjoy this Love Song to a Parsnip. She recognizes that beyond the pallid & frumpy appearance is a lovely root vegetable with a complicated, intense and sophisticated flavor.  I found this recipe last week and really like it – it calls for green garlic, but the leeks would work perfectly! There are also some great parsnip recipes in your packet.
  • Purple Sprouting Broccoli: This has been coming on strong!!  In addition to the little head of broccoli all the leaves and stems on the plant are sweet and tasty so enjoy those too. Kelly Myers – shareholder & chef – sent this recipe for Quelite Blanco en huevo. Quelites are wild or foraged greens but the sprouting broccoli, collards or chard all work wonderfully with the eggs, spice and cilantro! 
  • Popcorn: We love this Early Pink variety and I heard very enthusiastic reviews from some shareholders when I saw them this weekend! If you have a microwave you can put the whole cob in a brown paper bag and microwave it 1 min at a time for up to 3min. Most of the kernals will be popped off at that point so pour it in a bowl with some butter and salt & yum! BE CAREFUL – more than 4 consecutive minutes in the microwave  can cause the cobs to catch on fire!! Otherwise, take the kernals off the cob and make perfect popcorn the old fashioned way. 1 cob makes about 2 cups when it is popped.

Coming soon… The Summer Share!

In Your Share (March 19th edition)

By Laura

We have SUMMER SHARES for sale!! You can sign up & get more info HERE.

We’ve been busy in the greenhouse the last few weeks. It is full almost to bursting with baby broccoli, lettuce, onions and lots of other spring things. If you want to read more about the greenhouse, the crew, and our new germination chamber in Farm Manager, Ian Wilson’s most recent blog post.

You can download your Recipe Packet  here.  These are written by my friend Katherine Deumling at Cook With What You Have. This week she has some great ideas for root parsley and a recipe for Sauteed Greens & Eggs that I LOVE because it is so simple, fast & yum!

This week your share may include…

  • Beets: A few weeks ago I was in Mt Vernon, WA to present at a workshop on winter farming. I made sure to tell everyone about these Winterkeeper beets!! They are easy to grow and maintain their quality through the winter better than any other variety we’ve ever grown.
  • Collards: The leaves are smaller this time of year as they start to grow again in the spring sunshine but they’re still sweet, tender and tasty.
  • Kale Raab: This Winterbor kale is one of the first to begin flowering and it makes for tasty little broccolini like buds. The leaves of this variety also make great Kale Chips.  
  • Leeks: These King Richard leeks make a wonderful potato leek soup or just saute the tender stems with some greens – winter comfort food!
  • Onions: The Copra’s are a good solid yellow onion that keep extraordinarily well through the winter.
  • Root Parsley: These look alot like parsnips, but I find the flavor to be much more parsley-like. There are lots of good ideas for using these in your recipe packet.
  • Purple Sprouting Broccoli: This has been coming on strong!! We are still just picking Rudolf, our earliest variety. We are also growing “Early” Purple Sprouting, but no heads on that variety yet.  In addition to the little head of broccoli all the leaves and stems on the plant are sweet and tasty so enjoy those too.  
  • Popcorn: We love this Early Pink variety and I heard very enthusiastic reviews from some shareholders when I saw them this weekend! If you have a microwave you can put the whole cob in a brown paper bag and microwave it 1 min at a time for up to 3min. Most of the kernals will be popped off at that point so pour it in a bowl with some butter and salt & yum! BE CAREFUL – more than 4 consecutive minutes in the microwave  can cause the cobs to catch on fire!! Otherwise, take the kernals off the cob and make perfect popcorn the old fashioned way. 1 cob makes about 2 cups when it is popped.
  • Potatoes: These Yellow Finn are some of my favorite potatoes. It is a very popular gourmet potato in Europe and can be cooked almost any way you can imagine – mashed, boiled, fried or baked. One of my favorite things to make with this variety in the winter is Katherine’s Easy Scalloped Potatoes.

Coming soon… Many variations on the rapini & brocolini theme!

In Your Share (March 5th edition)

By Laura

We have SUMMER SHARES for sale!! You can sign up or get more info HERE.

It’s been everything from snowing to 60 degrees and sunny this week. That’s spring in Oregon – nothing if not unpredictable. Luckily Eric was at Grand Island with me on Sunday when the sun was shining and he took some great photos of our beautiful winter crops that you can see below.

You can download your Recipe Packet here.  These are written by my friend Katherine Deumling at Cook With What You Have. She’s going to continue to provide them through the rest of the winter share so let me know what you think?

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: The carrots are very sweet, but at this point the carrot rust fly has done quite a bit of damage to them. We store the carrots in the ground because we think that the flavor and freshness are superior to those stored in the cooler. However, the longer they are in the ground, the more damage the carrot rust fly can do. That said, even though they don’t look very good they still taste great!
  • Dried Fava Beans: This is the first time we’ve grown favas all the way to maturity. They’re quite common across the mediterranean region and into the Middle East. Thanks Katherine for contributing some great recipes.
  • Kale Raab: This Winterbor kale is one of the first to begin flowering and it makes for tasty little broccolini like buds. Definitely cook the intensely ruffled leaves and sweet stalk in the Brazilian soup from your recipe packet – as good or better than collards! The leaves of this variety also make great Kale Chips.  
  • Leeks: These King Richard leeks make a wonderful potato leek soup or just saute the tender stems with some greens – winter comfort food!
  • Parsnips: Lovely in the Winter Couscous.
  • Purple Sprouting Broccoli: It is SO exciting to have this in the share!! We are picking Rudolf, an early variety, which the catalog says should be ready by Christmas. Can’t believe everything you read I guess, but it definitely does mature earlier than the regular purple sprouting and we appreciate that. In addition to the little head of broccoli all the leaves and stems on the plant are sweet and tasty so enjoy those too.  
  • Popcorn: We love this Early Pink variety. If you have a microwave you can put the whole cob in a brown paper bag and microwave it 1 min at a time for up to 3min. Most of the kernals will be popped off at that point so pour it in a bowl with some butter and salt & yum! BE CAREFUL – more than 4 consecutive minutes in the microwave  can cause the cobs to catch on fire!! Otherwise, take the kernals off the cob and make perfect popcorn the old fashioned way. 1 cob makes about 2 cups when it is popped. And if you have a sweet tooth there is a Caramel Corn recipe in your packet : )
  • Potatoes: Nice red potatoes this week.

Coming soon… Many variations on the rapini & brocolini theme!

In Your Share (Feb 6th edition)

By Laura

As many of you know we had some flooding down at our Grand Island property last month. The island was completely cut off for several days and we had over 5′ of water in the back fields! Luckily, very few of the fields that we have planted  with winter crops went under water. Check out these flood photos if you’re interested.

You can download your Recipe Packet HERE.  These are written by my friend Katherine Deumling at Cook With What You Have. She’s going to continue to provide them through the rest of the winter share so let me know what you think?

This week your share may include…

  • Beets: We’re happy to see these delicious red beets back in the share. There are quite a few recipes in the packet this week. You can also check out my Beets 101 post for a few more ideas including my tried and true (and easy too!) Raw Beet and Apple Salad.
  • Carrots: These incredibly sweet carrots are one of the highlights of winter. Ya Ya is a new variety that we trialed this winter and it looks really good!
  • Collards: They are looking beautiful with purple and red highlights on the leaves. This is another veggie that sweetens up considerably in the winter.
  • Onions, Yellow: These Copra onions have great eating quality and they are our longest lasting onion in storage.
  • Parsnips: Some great ideas for these in your recipe packet.
  • Potatoes: Nice red potatoes this week.
  • Rutabaga: A few years ago my friend Scott at Nash’s Organic Produce gave me a taste of the rutabaga Gilfeather, and after that I was hooked. No other variety even comes close!  This variety is so good it has been included in the Slow Food US Ark of Taste, a catalog of over 200 delicious foods in danger of extinction. Help us protect and promote these foods by eating them. Katherine has included a few more rutabaga recipes in your packet this week.
  • Dry Beans – We’ve been experimenting growing different kinds of dry beans the last couple of years. This week you’ll see borlotti beans and black beans in your share. The Italian borlotti beans are speckled red. They have a nutty flavor and creamy texture. The black beans are traditional black turtle variety which are small shiny black bean with a dense meaty texture.

Coming soon… Purple Sprouting Broccoli!

In Your Share (Jan 16th edition)

By Laura

Will we have a snow day this week? Seems we’ll just have to wait and see. We’re headed out to harvest on Grand Island and things look good there. It’ll be chilly, but the ground isn’t frozen so we should be able to get the harvest in.

As many of you know, this cold weather make for super sweet veggies. This happens because when it gets cold, starches in the plant are broken up into smaller sugar molecules. This acts as a kind of antifreeze which protects the cells from damage during freezing weather. The good news for us is that it tastes good too!

You can download your Recipe Packet HERE.  These are written by my friend Katherine Deumling at Cook With What You Have. She’s going to continue to provide them through the rest of the winter share so let me know what you think?

This week your share may include…

  • Beets: We’re happy to see these delicious red beets back in the share. There are quite a few recipes in the packet this week. You can also check out my Beets 101 post for a few more ideas including my tried and true (and easy too!) Raw Beet and Apple Salad.
  • Carrots: These incredibly sweet carrots are one of the highlights of winter. We grow both Napoli and Bolero though the winter.
  • Collards: They are looking beautiful with purple and red highlights on the leaves. This is another veggie that sweetens up considerably in the winter.
  • Napa Cabbage: This variety Jazz made incredibly dense heads that are super sweet from all the cold weather. Use it as you would traditional cabbage for slaw or make Kimchi. I can’t believe that we still have Napa mid-January. I have heard from some folks “enough already!” and we promise to plant a little less next year. You’ll also be getting a break soon – it can’t last forever : )
  • Garlic: I can’t wait to roast these little heads for dinner later this week! Some of the heads are starting to sprout. This doesn’t change the flavor, and you can even use the green part when it comes out the top. But it does mean that you should use them up asap! Try roasting or saute a big batch and freeze them.
  • Onions, Yellow: These Copra onions have great eating quality and they are our longest lasting onion in storage.
  • Parsnips: Some great ideas for these in your recipe packet.
  • Potatoes: A few different varieties this week – some purple and also some small russets. The later will make great mini-baked potatoes!
  • Rosemary: This fall we harvested quite a bit of rosemary and dried it so we’d have some through the winter. Wonderful with potatoes and other roasted rood veggies.
  • Rutabaga: A few years ago my friend Scott at Nash’s Organic Produce gave me a taste of the rutabaga Gilfeather, and after that I was hooked. No other variety even comes close!  This variety is so good it has been included in the Slow Food US Ark of Taste, a catalog of over 200 delicious foods in danger of extinction. Help us protect and promote these foods by eating them. Katherine has included a few more rutabaga recipes in your packet this week.

Coming soon… Brussel Sprouts : )

In Your Share (Dec 12th edition)

By Laura

What beautiful bright sunny cold weather we’ve been having. This is very unusual for December in the Willamette Valley, but I’m not complaining. The record high pressure system sitting on top of the northwest has made for mostly calm days here, but caused some crazy winds in California. More important, the drier weather makes harvesting our winter crops a bit easier. This is the time of year when the mud can develop a certain quicksand like quality and suck your boots off. Happily that has not happened – yet!

This week have another fabulous Recipe Packet from my friend Katherine Deumling at Cook With What You Have. She’s going to continue to provide these through the rest of the winter share so let me know what you think? Download this week’s Recipe Packet HERE

Hope everyone has a Happy Holiday!! We’ll see you back at the farm for pickup the first week of January 2012.

This week your share may include…

  • Carrots: These incredibly sweet carrots are one of the highlights of winter.
  • Collards/Brussel Sprout Tops: These are some of our most dependable winter greens. I’m a huge fan of beans and greens no matter what culture they come from. Try  these recipes for Southern Style Black Eye Peas & Greens or Italian White Beans with Greens (the later recipe calls for chard but it works great with the collards!).
  • Celeriac/Celery Root: An ugly gnarly root with a lovely delicate celery flavor. This is an entertaining article about celeriac (though he doesn’t have very nice things to say about celery) and it includes a great recipe for Celery Remoulade (aka Céleri Rémoulade)
  • Garlic: We want everyone to stay healthy over the holidays so we’re giving out lots of garlic this week!
  • Kohlrabi: In the winter we grow two giant varieties – Kossac and Superschmeltz. Unlike other kohlrabi, these can get BIG and still stay sweet and crunchy. I cut a few bulbs today for a friend who had never tasted kohlrabi and they likened it to jicama – except better!
  • Napa Cabbage: This variety Jazz made incredibly dense heads that are super sweet from all the cold weather. Use it as you would traditional cabbage for slaw or make Kimchi.
  • Onions, Yellow & Red: I think some our our onions got a wee bit cold a few weeks ago and are showing some freeze damage at the tips & shoulder.  If the ones in your share  are starting to have a soft spot on top just cut it off and use the rest of the bulb. To make up for any damage you’ll get LOTS of onions in your share this week!
  • Potatoes: My favorite fingerlings, Austrian Crescent. These great little waxy potatos work well for roasting or boiling.
  • Rutabaga: A few years ago my friend Scott at Nash’s Organic Produce gave me a taste of the rutabaga Gilfeather, and after that I was hooked. No other variety even comes close!  This variety is so good it has been included in the Slow Food US Ark of Taste, a catalog of over 200 delicious foods in danger of extinction. Help us protect and promote these foods by eating them. Katherine has included several fabulous rutabaga recipes in your packet this week.
  • Winter Squash: A wide variety of squash in the box this week – kabocha, delicata, red kuri and acorn.

Coming soon… sweet winter parsnips and beets!!

In Your Share (Nov 1st)

By Laura

Welcome to the first week of the 2011-2012 Winter CSA!

It seems remarkably balmy still for November. I’ve been plowing with the horses down at the Grand Island farm in order to get more fields ready for springtime. The horses are lighter on the ground, so we can work them even when it is too wet for the tractor. This is nice because it means that we can get fieldwork done later into the fall (like now!) and earlier in the spring.

This week your share may include…

  • Beets: These big beautiful beets are an incredible winter variety called, not suprizingly, Winterkeeper. The greens on them are still very nice to be sure to use those too. If you’re looking for simple tips and recipes then read this post I wrote a few years ago called Beets 101.
  • Cauliflower or Broccoli: Your choice of happy heads of cauliflower or beautiful broccoli. This cauliflower is so tender it makes for perfected roasted florettes. Cut into bite sized pieces, toss with olive oil & salt, put on a jelly roll pan directly under the broiler. Keep your eye on it and shake the pan a few times to keep them from sticking. Pull them out when the edges just start to carmelize – easy, fast & yum! One of my favorite dishes is Gino’s Cauliflower Pasta. Often recipes suggest parboiling cauliflower first, but I have found that is not necessary with these heads and it can turn them to mush. The white cauliflower variety is Candid Charm and the green ones are called Panther. The broccoli variety is Arcadia.
  • Cabbage: These nice big heads are really sweet & tender so they’ll make a great salad or slaw. That said, on a cold fall evening there is nothing better than braised cabbage. Try this recipe for cabbage with onion & poached egg inspired by Cathy Whims at Nostrana.
  • Chard: Various greens are a staple during the winter. The Swiss Chard is not as winter hardy as some of the other types, but we should be able to enjoy it well into December. Provided the winter is not too harsh, we’ll also probably be able to pick some when it warms up in the spring too. Cook chard (and beet greens) just like you would spinach. I sauteed some last weekend with those beautiful red onions and then added them a fritatta which was fabulous. Also, if you haven’t tried my grandmothers Chard Bisque I highly recommend it!
  • Celery: I love home grown celery. It is not quite as tender as the pampered ones grown down south, but it has much better flavor. We’ll have some more at the next pickup too because I think it is a necessary ingredient in the traditional Thanksgiving stuffing.
  • Onions, Red Tropea: This sweet red Italian onion aka Rossa Lunga di Tropea has a slightly elongated shape. This onion variety is originally from Calabria – the region in southern Italy where my husbands family also came from : )
  • Parsley: When we are blessed with these big beautiful bunches of flat leaf Italian parsley I treat it less like an herb and more like greens ie. chard, spinach, kale. I often chop up greens and saute them as soon as I get home. They’ll keep in the fridge for up to a week and they’re ready to add to pasta, soup or eggs at any time. This makes the fit in the fridge much better too!
  • Peppers, Gypsy: Better late than never – this will be the last week of peppers – hip hip hooray that they finally ripened!!
  • Peppers, Jimmy Nardello: This is NOT a hot pepper. It is a traditional frying pepper that is usually ripened to red, but it these little green ones are good too.

Coming soon… Beautiful Winter Greens!!